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Restored antique wash stand

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Project by Larry posted 03-02-2015 06:00 PM 635 views 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I finished restoring this antique Victorian wash stand a couple months ago. Finding the original hardware took some time The top was all warped and the hardware was missing. The piece had been sitting outside for some time and was in bad shape. I’m sorry that I didn’t get before pictures.

-- LHeiss





9 comments so far

View wcunning's profile

wcunning

9 posts in 660 days


#1 posted 03-06-2015 09:10 PM

Nice work! Did you replace the top or dewarp it? If you dewarped it, how did you do it?

View Larry 's profile

Larry

6 posts in 654 days


#2 posted 03-06-2015 10:45 PM

Hello wcunning thank you for the comments!

I took the warp out. These tops came in two sections – one inverted on top of the other. I began by carefully removing the entire assembly and seperating the two sections. I then began cleaning each section, the top needed to be stripped down and sanded to remove the scaring and heavy water marks then very carefully planned some of the high spots. After some more sanding and prep work I began the process of reassembly and dewarping.

During the reassembly process I intalled the bottom section of the top to the cabinet carcass. I used clamps slowly decompressing the surface until it was flat and evenly distributed along the corner leg posts, side rails and face frame of the cabinet. Then replaced screw located at the corners into the top of the legs as well as along the front rear and side rails. After removing the clamps I placed the top section in place and began placing clamps around the outer perimeter and slowly began decompressing (tightening clamps) pulling the wood into place. This is a slow tedious task as you do not want to crack the top section of wood. It is much the same as one would slowly and methodically jack timber joists ( floor or ceiling joists back into position and place sister joist along side the joists for repair and strength.

The top was then refastened with screw from the under side utilizing the existing holes.

For the finish I chose a rich red mahogany color accenting the worn areas of the cabinet then I top coated with a clear coat.

-- LHeiss

View wcunning's profile

wcunning

9 posts in 660 days


#3 posted 03-06-2015 11:11 PM

Interesting. I have a china cabinet with similar issues, but it’s not constructed that way, so I doubt that will work for dewarping, sadly.

View Larry 's profile

Larry

6 posts in 654 days


#4 posted 03-07-2015 12:20 AM

WC are you able to carefully remove the top on the China cabinet?

-- LHeiss

View Larry 's profile

Larry

6 posts in 654 days


#5 posted 03-07-2015 12:31 AM

Also can you send a picture or post a picture of the China cabinet

-- LHeiss

View wcunning's profile

wcunning

9 posts in 660 days


#6 posted 03-07-2015 12:33 AM

Yeah, the top was just finish nailed in place, but it’s a solid 4/4 piece, which is more warped than I have been able to fix with slow clamping. I’m going to have to try some steaming next, I think.

View Larry 's profile

Larry

6 posts in 654 days


#7 posted 03-07-2015 12:39 AM

Great that was my next suggestion.

The top will have to be removed. Place it in a steam tent to get it playable then with weight you may be able to remove some of the warp.

I would have to take a look at the piece but I believe that would be you next option. The lastly a resurfacing by plaining depend on the piece and design of the cabinet.

-- LHeiss

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


#8 posted 03-07-2015 03:13 PM

You did a real nice job on this.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Larry 's profile

Larry

6 posts in 654 days


#9 posted 03-07-2015 05:49 PM

Thank you Hw

-- LHeiss

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