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End Grain Floor

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Project by suebee posted 01-19-2009 10:31 PM 4473 views 6 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Okay. We started back June of last year. It took some time to tear up the old linoleum floor and subfloor and pull off all of the kitchen cabinet doors. All the while we were cutting down all of our tiles which were Douglas Fir 4 X 4 from 16 foot beams. We have over 3000 tiles but plan to do another room as well. We have all of the doors degreased and are getting ready to strip them and there are a lot of cabinets! That is going to take some time. We degreased and stripped all of the cabinet frames and they are ready for sanding once we start the floor. We thought we would make one big mess all at once. Since then we tore off all of the knotty pine off of the walls and plastered, textured and painted the walls. Lot of plastering to do there and we added a piece over the kitchen sink. I am going to post more pictures once I have this posting done. We decided that we didn’t want to get rid of all of knotty pine we took off the walls and my son Steve had the idea of making knotty pine tiles for the ceiling with them. The only thing is we were short of tiles. So we bought new knotty pine planks and made them as well but they were considerally lighter so we decied to do a random checkerboard style ceiling. The only problem is the new tiles are bowing a bit and we haven’t figured out how to get them flat in the ceiling frames. Believe it or not we actually had problems getting 2 foot T grids because home depot couldn’t find them in three different stores! Finally had to go to Lowe’s. The ceiling was 2 X 4 we changed it to 2 X 2. And we painted the grid white. So ceiling is done so far until we install the three Amber wrought iron lights that will come last. (We got a super deal on the lights on ebay. They listed as 300.00 and we got them for 2 for $25.00 ea and one bigger one for $40.00! I will show you pics eventually.)
Then we pulled a 4’ X 8’ piece of the floor so we could shave off the top of the beam so the floor would be more level. The beams are old and large 12 X 12, so 1/4 ” would not have hurt and did a world of good to improve the leveling of the floor. We had a hump running across the floor and didn’t want problems later on. We did use some leveling compound on some of the areas as well. So with the hump removed, the ceiling somewhat done, cabinets ready for sanding, we finally started to lay the tiles. We only have about a 5 X 4 area left to do and then we have to do the custom perimeter tiles. The kitchen is an L shape. We were hoping to be ready to sand next weekend. At the recommedation of another lumber jock, Tom, we used Bruce Equalizer adhesive. Tom helped us a lot with all of our questions and watching his post was a huge help in building our confidence! Thank you TOM! :) So this is what we have so far. I only posted 3 pics cuz that is all it said we could add for now, so as soon as I figure out how to manuever the web site more I will post more pics.
We would love your input on our project. Please don’t hestate to tell what you think, good or bad! Thank you!

-- sues





17 comments so far

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8790 posts in 2765 days


#1 posted 01-19-2009 10:53 PM

Concerning the ceiling tile panels that you made:

1. When I install the knotty pine T&G I finish BOTH sides of it. This helps prevent cupping because it is sealed equally on both sides. It does not prevent it 100% but it is very effective at moderating it.
2. I nest the tongue and groove pieces together but I do not make them overly tight. This material will swell and start buckling on the wall or ceiling.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View suebee's profile

suebee

34 posts in 2282 days


#2 posted 01-19-2009 11:00 PM

Thank you Todd! I am still awestruck from your Montana video!
You know we have done nothing to the planks. No finish or anything. We realized that it may not work. We may change the ceiling altogether but for now it just laying in there. We wanted to see what people said about it and get some input I really appreciate your words! Thanks again!

By the way, you do beautifl work! Just awesome!

-- sues

View suebee's profile

suebee

34 posts in 2282 days


#3 posted 01-19-2009 11:04 PM

I also wanted to add that the old plank off the wall is perfectly flat. Plus we pressed it when we glued the pieces together. But that did not work as well with the new plank.

-- sues

View Thomas Porter's profile

Thomas Porter

127 posts in 2796 days


#4 posted 01-19-2009 11:23 PM

Nice job guys! That Equalizer stuff is great, huh? Have fun sanding! Can’t wait to see your finished project!

-- Thomas Porter, Phoenix, AZ, www.thomasporter.com

View BarryW's profile

BarryW

1015 posts in 2572 days


#5 posted 01-20-2009 12:47 AM

I have to say I have never seen a floor like that…and was thinking of doing something in a bathroom…and reading Todd’s response, it seems logical to finish both sides…and a thick epoxy finish additional on the top side…like on bars…but truly I’m no expert.

-- /\/\/\ BarryW /\/\/\ Stay so busy you don't have time to die.

View DRdeveloper's profile

DRdeveloper

23 posts in 2131 days


#6 posted 01-20-2009 01:17 AM

I’m curious – did you consider laying out the floor with a design based on the swirl of the grain? Or did you do it randomly on purpose. It’s a very original idea and kudos to you for taking a risk on it… looking forward to seeing the finished product.

-- Mark, Dominican Republic

View suebee's profile

suebee

34 posts in 2282 days


#7 posted 01-20-2009 01:23 AM

Well Barry remember that Todd was talking about the planks in the ceiling. I was trying to figure out how to get the new planks to lay flat. Maybe I didn’t understand you. Are you considering doing the floor or ceiling?
The floors are beautifull! Tom Porter just posted a new one he did in his bathroom take a look at that beaut! He has about 3 of them posted on lumberjocks. Let me know if you took a look at them.

-- sues

View suebee's profile

suebee

34 posts in 2282 days


#8 posted 01-20-2009 01:28 AM

Mark, We decided to do them randomly. The blocks already have such a variety of irregular swirls it might have hard to keep a pattern. And we actually picked some that were a bit moldy because we liked the grey color it produced. They all dried real nice. I liked the random look and I think it will smooth out and look a little differently once it is sanded. We wanted to keep them a natural color because we knew the tiles would golden as they aged.

-- sues

View Karson's profile

Karson

34878 posts in 3066 days


#9 posted 01-20-2009 03:30 AM

Great Looking Job.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Todd Thomas 's profile

Todd Thomas

4969 posts in 2114 days


#10 posted 01-20-2009 03:58 AM

looks good….I’m thinking about doing this to a floor, after seeing Tom’s post on his, as well. What are you doing to fill the areas between the wooden tiles?

-- Todd, Oak Ridge, TN, Hello my name is Todd and I'm a Toolholic, I bought my last tool 10 days, no 4 days, oh heck I bought a tool on the way here! †

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8790 posts in 2765 days


#11 posted 01-20-2009 05:07 AM

You are right about my comments Suebee, I was talking about the knotty pine planks on the ceiling grid.

We call it back-priming when the back is sealed. I do this on all of my jobs, like any quality contractor would do;)

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View suebee's profile

suebee

34 posts in 2282 days


#12 posted 01-20-2009 06:11 AM

Hi Todd, Filler for in between…I have to say we really have been relying on Tom’s expertise since he did 3 of these floors already. We were planning on using the sawdust we saved from all of the cutting and mixing it with polyurethane. Now Tom added stain to his and you have be real careful about the measurements each time cuz you may have to make more of the mix and it would be easy to get the shading off. Tom did advise me that it may be better to use sawdust with an epoxy resin since he noticed there was a little problem with cracks. I am not sure if epoxy resin is the same as polyurethane. I was going to talk to Tom about that. I haven’t had a chance to research it further. I will let you know what I find out. We are real determined amatuers! I guess that is a good thing. Also, something that we are looking at is doing is leaving the floor natural, no stain. I haven’t decided yet. I thought the lighter color reminded me of some of clean looks I saw when I was in Germany and Austria. I might change my mind a couple more times! :) The cabinets would be natural as well. Then we were planning on a black granite countertop with the wrought iron hardware. The room used to be so dark, we wanted to lighten it a bit but we knew the floor and ceiling would tone down the walls a bit. We may change color on the wall as well, I want to see how they hold up to dirt. Here in the mountain it is really dusty.

-- sues

View Todd Thomas 's profile

Todd Thomas

4969 posts in 2114 days


#13 posted 01-20-2009 03:47 PM

Sue,
Not sure on the epoxy thing, maybe ask Todd Clippinger, Tom or one of the other more experienced people here..I wanted to use a sawdust mixture BUT not use poly or an epoxy…..I wanted to tung oil or use Waterlox on the floor that I was going to do..mmmmm need to think on that. I like the nature look as well of course your oil base poly will amber over time…..I’ll follow this to see what you do
Good luck

-- Todd, Oak Ridge, TN, Hello my name is Todd and I'm a Toolholic, I bought my last tool 10 days, no 4 days, oh heck I bought a tool on the way here! †

View Thomas Porter's profile

Thomas Porter

127 posts in 2796 days


#14 posted 01-20-2009 06:47 PM

As I had mentioned to you in a private message suebee… I dislike the use of regular grout in my endgrain floor. The ones I’ve seen in the past and did on my last floor (the condo project) was a sawdust and glue (epoxy) grout. I have read that appropriately colored flexible wood filler is a great grout for endgrain. The trouble with substances that don’t bond well to the wood is that the wood will have a tendency to shrink and seperate from it leaving little cracks where moisture and dirt can get in. The floor is incredibly resistant to marring and damage, but water and other substances that get in underneath can become an enemy.

I’m going to do the entirety of my house in an endgrain floor this summer and I’m hoping to video it because it deals with a huge number of solutions for everybody, including redoing my regular grout with a flexible wood filler grout. Everytime I do an endgrain floor it’s an experiment because of so many factors, but I’m glad to see other people are reviving this lost art!

-- Thomas Porter, Phoenix, AZ, www.thomasporter.com

View suebee's profile

suebee

34 posts in 2282 days


#15 posted 01-21-2009 07:12 AM

Tom, If I am understanding you right you are recommending the glue (epoxy) and sawdust. Can you recommend a glue (epoxy)? I am thinking that sawdust and glue (epoxy) may seems to have the best flexible quality that we want. I wasn’t sure if epoxy was the same thing as polyurethane….feeling kind of dumb here! :)

-- sues

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