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Mission Styled Baby Crib

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Project by Duane Kohles posted 2859 days ago 2297 views 6 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

When my wife and I learned we were expecting a set of twins, I designed and built two cribs. We had an idea of what we wanted, so I purchased the hardware from Rockler and reverse engineered it to make sure everything would work upon final assembly.

I used 4/4, 6/4 and 8/4 red oak for materials. The 4/4 went into the slats and lower horizontal rails, the 8/4 made the legs, and the 6/4 made the cap pieces as well as the upper arched rails. As these are meant to be heirlooms (one for each child) I knew that a vast majority of a cribs life span will be spent in storage. So the entire crib breaks down into 4 main components, the back, the two sides, and the front. The cribs are constructed entirely of mortice and tennon joints, the only fasteners are the bolts that attach the sides to the back (also a mortice and tennon joint). I finished the cribs with several coats of Watco Penetrating Oil, and after a week of drying time I applied a couple coats of lacquer, as most storage places are not nice to fine furniture.

I made the first set 4 1/2 years ago and they took everything my two little guys could dish out. After these two I made I made three more for friends and family.

-- Duane Kohles





8 comments so far

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2909 days


#1 posted 2859 days ago

CONGRADULATIONS ON THE TWINS!! I LOVE THE CLEAN LOOK OF THE MISSION STYLE AND THE OAK IS BEAUTIFULLY FINISHED. YOU HAVE TWO VERY BLESSED CHILDREN. I HOPE THEY WILL CHERISH THOSE CRIBS AS THEY GROW OLDER AND HAVE A NEED FOR THEM THEMSELVES. THANKS FOR SHARING.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2898 days


#2 posted 2859 days ago

Beautiful !
I think these will last for centuries, & be cherished by all.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Duane Kohles's profile

Duane Kohles

38 posts in 2898 days


#3 posted 2859 days ago

Thanks for the positive feed back guys! Always appreciated. I have had lots of compliments from the “nonwoodworkers” in my life, but compliments from those who understand the invisible how’s and why’s of a project mean even more to me.

-- Duane Kohles

View Brian's profile

Brian

26 posts in 2687 days


#4 posted 2687 days ago

Hello Duane,

Beautiful looking crib. I’m an expecting father that is getting ready to build my son a crib. I have decided to go with the heirloom crib, but with a few minor changes. I have one question for you. How did you install your vertical slates? My plan calls for cutting a grove in the upper and lower rails and then using filler blocks between the slats. Hopefully my question makes sense.

Thanks!
Brian

-- Brian, Washington

View Duane Kohles's profile

Duane Kohles

38 posts in 2898 days


#5 posted 2687 days ago

Brian
Thanks, and that is exactly how I made mine. The lower rails on the sides, back and gate are the same thickness as the slats. So I milled a 3/8 wide x 3/8 (or 1/2) deep dado full lenth of the rail. I then milled a mating tennon on the slats (all four faces), so any gap between the tennon and the mortice will be covered by the shoulder of the tennon. I kept the tennon a little short, so excess glue would have a place to go. I made a stick of filler wood 3/8 wide and tall enough to be proud after gluing. After I determined the length of the filler pieces I cut them to length and glued them in (using the tennoned slats to set the distance), after the glue dried I then jointed that edge flat, so the end appearance was a bunch of individually cut mortices. Then I glued the slats into the upper and lower rails.

The arched upper rails on the sides and back were basically the same, but because I wanted an arch and the detail of a thicker upper rail, I did not tennon the upper end of the slat. Instead the whole slat became the tennon. Same process, except after the spacer blocks were glued in and dried, I cut the arches.

I hope this helps, feel free to contact me if you have any questions. It was definately one of the more rewarding projects I have ever tackled.

-- Duane Kohles

View Brian's profile

Brian

26 posts in 2687 days


#6 posted 2687 days ago

This sounds like a winnner. My plan does not call for tenons on the slats. The plan just states that the slats should be 3/8” wide to fit in the 3/8” wide grove. The way you did it sounds like the best way since the tenon shoulder would cover up any possible gaps with the mortise.

Thanks for the feedback Duane… I do appreciate it.

-- Brian, Washington

View Duane Kohles's profile

Duane Kohles

38 posts in 2898 days


#7 posted 2685 days ago

Good Luck Brian!

Can’t wait to see the finished product.

-- Duane Kohles

View Karson's profile

Karson

34853 posts in 2999 days


#8 posted 2685 days ago

Very nice set of cribs.

You should be proud.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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