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Jessi's Coffee Table

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Project by TZH posted 02-19-2015 05:14 PM 1853 views 2 times favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch

As usual, this share wouldn’t be complete without me filing a complaint about the photographer, but, hey….

This time, I might even file a complaint against the guy (me) who set this photo op up in the first place. Basically too lazy to get it down to the house (impatient, too) for a better setting, but, hey….

This one has been a very long project in the works. It was started last summer, but had to be put on the back burner so Katherine and I could fly to CT to help out her folks after her Dad had major surgery (much better now, although the snow they’re getting back there keeps him puttering around very close to the house for the time being).

When we returned, sickness hit hard here, and I just didn’t have it in me to get back into the shop. It wasn’t until early this year I felt good enough to reboot this effort.

From that point on, it’s pretty much been a series of starts, stops, and redoes because of the errors I’ve made (no sympathy for stupidity in most cases).

The last straw was when I had to re-sand the entire tabletop (talked about it here on LJ’s, and thanks to all you fellow LJ’ers who gave advice and encouragement), and start from scratch re-finishing the top.

Then it was a question of what to use in the final go round. A friend on FB recommended I try lacquer. Did some research and decided to give it a try. The final result is what you see in this post.

Overall, I’m glad this project is done. The lacquer worked really well, although I still need to do the final rub out because there were some inevitable dust nibs in the surface. I just have to let the lacquer cure for a few days before doing that, and then it’s DELIVERY TIME!

Hope our daughter likes this.

Thanks for looking.
TZH

-- Where The Spirit In Wood Lives On





22 comments so far

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1643 posts in 1738 days


#1 posted 02-19-2015 06:35 PM

TZH,

The sign of a true Craftsman is ‘Stick-to-it-tive-ness’.
Done and Done, ...on to the next project.

Great looking table and it’s finished.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23189 posts in 2333 days


#2 posted 02-19-2015 06:37 PM

That table is beautiful.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

22040 posts in 1804 days


#3 posted 02-19-2015 07:11 PM

I love your work. Brings out the natural beauty. Great job.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7798 posts in 2769 days


#4 posted 02-19-2015 08:37 PM

you and i have the same type of love for natural wood, this is a real beauty, its a favorite of mine for sure.

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View Jim Sellers's profile

Jim Sellers

397 posts in 1801 days


#5 posted 02-19-2015 09:50 PM

beautiful table…..Uh..yea, I think your daughter will like it.

-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.

View jaykaypur's profile

jaykaypur

4006 posts in 1874 days


#6 posted 02-19-2015 09:59 PM

Beautiful job on this. You seem to have taken care of the inlay problem and it turned out just great. She will love this.

-- Use it up, Wear it out --------------- Make it do, Or do without!

View parsonpaul's profile

parsonpaul

29 posts in 709 days


#7 posted 02-20-2015 12:57 AM

It looks really good. Your epic story sounds like something that would happen to me.

I have one question/observation.
I am a fan of lacquer too, BUT isn’t lacquer’s nemesis alcohol?
Since this is a table is that going to be a problem?

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2156 days


#8 posted 02-20-2015 01:05 AM

That turned out beautifully after all your trials and tribulations! Brushed or sprayed lacquer? I love the bases. And the base/top attachment is interesting (not sure how you did that).

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View TZH's profile

TZH

526 posts in 2606 days


#9 posted 02-20-2015 01:24 AM



It looks really good. Your epic story sounds like something that would happen to me.

I have one question/observation.
I am a fan of lacquer too, BUT isn t lacquer s nemesis alcohol?
Since this is a table is that going to be a problem?

- parsonpaul

I’m hoping that our daughter will go with a custom cut piece of glass over this table. Her plan is to be able to eat off it while watching TV (sitting on the floor). The dire warnings are given in about as ominous tone as I can possibly give, but ultimately it’s up to her whether or not she follows through on it.

-- Where The Spirit In Wood Lives On

View Mustang67's profile

Mustang67

102 posts in 1020 days


#10 posted 02-20-2015 01:32 AM

Glad it worked out. But don’t let the table drink.

View TZH's profile

TZH

526 posts in 2606 days


#11 posted 02-20-2015 02:05 AM



That turned out beautifully after all your trials and tribulations! Brushed or sprayed lacquer? I love the bases. And the base/top attachment is interesting (not sure how you did that).

- gfadvm

This was brushed. It was recommended that I spray, but for this one I went with materials on hand.

If you give me a few minutes, I’ll be back with some links to how I did it.

TZH

-- Where The Spirit In Wood Lives On

View TZH's profile

TZH

526 posts in 2606 days


#12 posted 02-20-2015 02:17 AM

gfadvm, thought it best to just share some images of the process:

Basically, it involves routing a couple cookies and mounting them to the pedestals before trying to attach them to the underside of the table (photo above).

I’ve never liked cookies underneath that showed, though. So I came up with this method to “hide” them by routing out on the underside of the table top to accommodate the cookies:

The depth of cut equals the thickness of the cookie (3/4”) so the cookie set right down in flush with the bottom of the table top:

Next step was to actually attach the cookies to the pedestals:

The last step was to then attach the cookies to the underside of the table top using screws short enough to prevent them from going through the top:

And the result is a table top that appears to just sit on top of the pedestals, but those suckers aren’t coming loose unless someone actually does it themselves.

Hope that helps.
TZH

-- Where The Spirit In Wood Lives On

View TZH's profile

TZH

526 posts in 2606 days


#13 posted 02-20-2015 02:28 AM

A friend of mine stopped by and, unbeknownst to him beforehand, when he arrived I tapped him to help get the table down to the house. Couldn’t do it myself because it weighs in somewhere between 95 and 100 lbs. Anyway, once we got it where it needed to be, I took a few more pictures…..better pictures…..much better pictures. Still not the best (should I fire myself from photography?), but thought I’d share a couple of them to give a little better idea of what it will look like once it gets to its destination:

Thanks for all your kind comments.
TZH

-- Where The Spirit In Wood Lives On

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2156 days


#14 posted 02-20-2015 02:46 AM

TZH, Thanks for the reply and the pictorial on how you did the attachment. I’ll be hunting some nice stumps as I really like how yours turned out. Of course getting them flat and parallel on the top and bottom will be a problem for me. Maybe put them on my sawmill and cut, flip, and repeat?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View TZH's profile

TZH

526 posts in 2606 days


#15 posted 02-20-2015 03:13 AM

You have a sawmill? You lucky dog, you!!!!!

Yep, a sawmill would make pretty short work of it, that’s for sure. I use my adjustable height router planer for these kinds of projects, though, because it gets the tops and bottoms almost perfectly parallel every single time.

If you haven’t seen it before, I have my own personal blog where I discuss this router planer. The post that illustrates best what you’re looking at doing can be seen here, if you’re interested. The whole setup is cheap and easy, and the height adjustment feature is something I’ve not seen on anything I’ve researched so far.

TZH

-- Where The Spirit In Wood Lives On

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