LumberJocks

Adjustable Trivets

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Project by TheDane posted 02-01-2015 07:52 PM 2689 views 25 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

LumberJocks Toughcut and Lazyman posted expandable trivet projects that caught my eye, so I decided to turn out a few to see how they would sell at an upcoming craft show.

These are made from Red Oak and Yellow Birch. I cut the segments from 1/2” stock milled to 1” wide. Each segment is 6” in length.

I followed the instructions from Toughcut and Lazyman pretty closely (thanks to both of them for providing detailed plans), but with one exception. Since these are destined for sale at a craft show, I decided to pin the glue joints with a 3/16” hardwood dowel where end-grain meets face-grain. The glue joint itself is probably strong enough, but the hardwood pin should reduce the chance of it breaking if somebody drops it.

These are fun to make, and a bit challenging!

Here are the projects I drew these from:

ToughCut
Click for details

Lazyman
Click for details

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"





11 comments so far

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

9435 posts in 3515 days


#1 posted 02-01-2015 08:04 PM

COOL ideas…!!

Good project for scraps… :)

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View nimkee's profile

nimkee

19 posts in 673 days


#2 posted 02-02-2015 12:56 AM

nice good work nice idea

View GpaBrian's profile

GpaBrian

14 posts in 818 days


#3 posted 02-02-2015 04:53 AM

These are great. The pictures are a great help understanding how they are built.

View ToughCut's profile

ToughCut

40 posts in 1069 days


#4 posted 02-02-2015 06:06 AM

Like your Trivets, I am glad to see people are enjoying making the trivets. When I make my next set of trivets I plan to make an improved jig and will post details. PS thanks for the acknowledgement.

-- If you are not willing to learn, No one can help you. If you are determined to learn, No one can stop you.

View kweinert's profile

kweinert

38 posts in 2572 days


#5 posted 02-02-2015 02:54 PM

Nice work.

I made one of these as well out of some 3/8” alder cutoffs I happened to have around just to see how they turned out after seeing them posted a couple of times here.

I learned that you can make the pieces both left and right handed. Glad I had extra cutoffs :)

Quick question – people I showed it to liked it but worried about it coming apart. I thought of using a rare earth magnet and washer to give a bit of resistance at the open position but I’ve read that they can lose their ‘attraction’ at higher temps. Anyone played with an idea similar to this?

-- Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterward. But properly learned, the lesson forever changes the person.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3125 days


#6 posted 02-02-2015 03:29 PM

... I plan to make an improved jig …

I’m anxious to see what you come up with. My jig is a little crude, but served my purposes. Since I was using rub joints, the parts were only in the jig for a few minutes, but I’d like to see ways I could speed up the gluing process.

... people I showed it to liked it but worried about it coming apart. I thought of using a rare earth magnet and washer to give a bit of resistance at the open position …

I made a prototype out of pine and played around with the idea of routing a groove in one side and inserting a peg to keep the three parts together. I couldn’t get it to work … maybe it required a lot more precision and patience than I can summon. The prototype had an ‘accident’ and wound up in the burn barrel.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View devann's profile

devann

2200 posts in 2155 days


#7 posted 02-02-2015 04:21 PM

Cool project, and well done. I like the idea & design. A friend gave me a trivet that converts into a heart shaped bowl. It was made on a scroll saw.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View badgerhammer's profile

badgerhammer

7 posts in 673 days


#8 posted 02-07-2015 09:25 PM

those are neat. how well did they end up selling?

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

694 posts in 850 days


#9 posted 02-08-2015 03:20 PM

I somehow missed these when you originally posted them. Very nice. I definitely like the way they look with thinner stock (mine was 3/4”). I’d like to know how well they sell.
The contrasting dowel is a nice detail, though I manhandled mine pretty well during final sanding and never had a problem with the joint even though it was only about an hour after the final glue up. I think that because there is a little face grain between the 2 layers, those end grain joints are not that big of a problem. Another cool idea might be to cut a tenon or finger joint and eliminate the end grain joints completely. I might have to experiment with that in Sketchup to see how difficult that would be to cut. Might not be too bad if you cut them before making the angled cuts.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

4997 posts in 3125 days


#10 posted 02-08-2015 04:40 PM

those are neat. how well did they end up selling?

I’d like to know how well they sell.

I had a table at a small (4 hour) craft show yesterday that was not well attended. I had them priced at $20, and sold one, and had two other lookers that asked for my business card should they decide to buy them. A lot of people stopped to look at them and commented how clever they are.

I think that because there is a little face grain between the 2 layers, those end grain joints are not that big of a problem.

I agree … future copies will probably not have the pinned joints, and will be made from 3/8” stock.

I would like to figure out a way (pin and groove?) to keep them from coming apart. A couple of lookers Saturday said they were afraid they wouldn’t be able to get them back together if they did come apart. I demonstrated how easy it is to get them back together, but some folks are just phobic about anything they perceive to require a little manual dexterity!

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

694 posts in 850 days


#11 posted 02-09-2015 04:03 AM

Gerry, I thought about the pin and groove or perhaps a thin piece of wood in a groove to prevent it from being pulled apart too but I was worried it would be too hard to make it slide smoothly so I came up with another idea though I haven’t tried it yet. You basically cut 3 little 1/2” triangles the same thickness (for example 3/8”) and glue it in after you slide the 3 components together but only to the tops or bottoms (but not both). Clear as mud right? Hopefully a picture is worth a thousand words:

Note that I drew it on the unassembled leg to help visualize where it sits but you obviously cannot glue it there until after you slide the 3 corners together. Three 1/2” triangles would make it so that it is 1” smaller when fully extended but you could always increase the length if it’s too small then. I suppose you could make the little triangle smaller but that might make it hard to get in place. Of course, you have to be careful that you don’t glue the whole thing together when these pieces are glued in place. It’s hard to tell from the drawing whether this would detract from the cool look of this design. I think that you could also make it a little a little diamond so that it forms a closed triangle in the middle.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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