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Child's adj. Chair plans

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Project by LesB posted 12-29-2008 08:26 PM 6233 views 20 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

By popular request I am posting the plans for the child’s adjustable chair. The drawings were made primarily for my own use so I don’t guaranty they are error free. If you find a serious error let me know. I am submitting these plans for personal use only so do not use them for re sale as I do not know if the original design had been patented and you could get into trouble selling them on the open market. The info below would have been on a fourth page so i copied it here for you use. If anyone wants a printable PDF copy just give me an email address to send it to. That will give you a full size pattern of the hooks and metal plate. I noticed the materials list displays as a continuous sentence so I tried putting—-separators in

MATERIALS LIST
All wood should be hardwood. Oak, maple, mahogany, or walnut, for strength. 2 ea. 5/4” X 22” X 3 1/4” bases legs— 2 ea 3/4” X 35” X 3 1/2” vertical sides— 11 ea 5/8” dowel 13” +/——- 2 ea 3/4” dowel 13” base spreaders—- 4 ea 3/8” X 1” dowel pins—- 1 ea 3/4” X 13” X 3 1/2” upper spreader (back rest)—- 1 ea 3/4” X 13” X 2 1/2” lower spreader—- 2 ea 3/4” X 12 1/2” X 3 1/2” seat supports—- 1 ea 3/4” X 10 1/4” (+ -) X 10 1/2” seat—- 2 ea 1/8” aluminum for reinforcement plate (1 1/2” X 3 1/2”)—- 6 ea 1/2” #6 screws—- Urethane glue & or yellow carpenters glue 5/8” & 3/4 Forstner bit with drill press and band or saber saw are essential. Note: Dowels are not always true to size so check them against your drill bit size and adjust as necessary.
Obviously there are some areas in the drawing such as the top of the chair uprights, the front edge of the seat, and the foot pieces that can and should be rounded and curved removing any sharp corners and angles. It is illustrated this way because it is easier to draw. For most edges I used a 1/4” router bit to round edges. Be careful at junction of vertical sides and foot pieces, do no tround over, also at seat support and seat joints. The easiest way to make the open space under the foot section is to drill half round holes at each end with a Forstner bit to get a nice clean radius and then make the straight saw cut between them.

I used urethane glue (Groilla glue) because it is water proof; it expands to fill small voids and any excess that comes out of joints is easy to scrape away AFTER it dries. A THIN coat of glue on one part of the joint is all you need. If you have not used it before, experiment on some scrap pieces of wood. It does require some moderate clamping pressure while curing and dampening he joint with water helps the glue cure.
If biscuits are used to join seat to supports use yellow glue, urethane does not expand biscuits properly.
Shop around for the dowels. Some places carry 36” and some carry 48”. Get the 48” if you can, that way you get three rungs out of each piece with less waste.

-- Les B, Oregon





10 comments so far

View John Stegall's profile

John Stegall

412 posts in 2201 days


#1 posted 12-29-2008 09:32 PM

Thanks for posting these plans. BTW Midwest Dowel (no affiliation on my part) has some high quality dowels. If I remember correctly, they do require a $50 minimum but they are high quality.
If anyone has a 5/8 round over bit (router) and a router table, you can make your own dowels. Since I have quite a bit of 4/4 mesquite leftover, I will try and make the ones I have to make out of that.

What is the angle of the chair leg to the base leg?

-- jstegall

View ND2ELK's profile

ND2ELK

13495 posts in 2459 days


#2 posted 12-29-2008 10:30 PM

Thanks for the info.

Tom

-- Mc Bridge Cabinets, Iowa

View moshel's profile

moshel

864 posts in 2369 days


#3 posted 12-29-2008 11:12 PM

Thanks!!! Just wondering (as getting dowels from exotic wood is near impossible here and i dont really like big round over bits, especially from 4 sides) if slightly rounded over squars would work just as well. i understand that the contact at the pressure points will be smaller, hence might compress the wood but it still should be ok.

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

View LesB's profile

LesB

1069 posts in 2128 days


#4 posted 12-30-2008 12:46 AM

The angle of the chair leg (center line of the dowels) is 10 degrees. Clearly stated in the upper left corner of the drawing in red, and again indicated in the drawing of the hooks by the angle of the two holes. also note I used a blind dado (hole) for the dowels so they do not show on the outside. The dowels used as stretchers on the base can be repositioned (set back) if necessary to allow the base to straddle table legs.

-- Les B, Oregon

View LesB's profile

LesB

1069 posts in 2128 days


#5 posted 12-30-2008 12:56 AM

Moshel
Is oak an exotic wood in New Zealand? I was luck enough to visit your country a couple of years ago and if I didn’t have family here I would move there in a heartbeat. Anyway, to answer your question. I think square rungs would work but because the hooks only make contact on the outside inch or so you could just round over that portion. Also while it might be more work you could adjust the hook holes to accommodate a square dowel. Another alternative that just came to mind is to use metal pipe although aluminum and copper might be to soft unless you reinforced it from the inside with something, like a wood dowel. It is always interesting to expose my projects to other people’s input. It expands my own creativity. Good luck.

-- Les B, Oregon

View moshel's profile

moshel

864 posts in 2369 days


#6 posted 12-30-2008 01:22 AM

surprisingly enough, it is. well, its not native anyway. when they cut down oak, they make it into fire wood! the horror! the horror! other than that shortcoming, i agree – this is a wonderful country and i am very happy here.
you can get some oak timber (usually imported) but i don’t think i have ever seen dowels.

everything here is radiata pine. i am not sure a radiata pine will hold well, although the pressure is really near the ends, so the strength of the wood is not that important, i think. i’ll sacrifice on of my kids for the sake of experiment :-)

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

View John Stegall's profile

John Stegall

412 posts in 2201 days


#7 posted 12-30-2008 04:36 AM

I actually saw the angle and thought I had edited the question out…guess not. I also made an error in the size of the roundover bit needed to make a 5/8” dowel if one were inclined to do so…5/16” is the correct size, not 5/8.

-- jstegall

View LesB's profile

LesB

1069 posts in 2128 days


#8 posted 12-30-2008 06:55 AM

Moshel Your next stress point is the tenon that joins the upright to the footings. You might want to upgrade the size of both pieces if you use a softer wood. Also increase the metal plates length and add some more screws. Good luck.

-- Les B, Oregon

View pitchnsplinters's profile

pitchnsplinters

262 posts in 2123 days


#9 posted 01-12-2009 07:17 AM

Very nice chair. Do you have a guesstimate on the weight capacity? Safe age range? Have you sat down on one?

Keep up the great work.

-- Just 'cause a cat has kittens in the oven, it don't make 'em biscuits.

View LesB's profile

LesB

1069 posts in 2128 days


#10 posted 01-12-2009 07:57 PM

pitchnsplinters,

I have a cautious estimate of about 100 pounds but I have put up to 200 on them (my butt). If I wanted them to hold more than 100 I would use larger dowels and provide more support to the joint between the uprights and the base pieces. Either a brace and/or thicker wood and larger tenon joint. I have made over a dozen with no failures reported yet. On one the metal safety cleat eventually cut through the dowel and the dowel had to be replaced….after about 8 years of daily use.

-- Les B, Oregon

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