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Grinding jig for butchering chisels and irons

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Project by TheFridge posted 01-24-2015 02:17 AM 1971 views 2 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Grinding jig for butchering chisels and irons
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I got a group of planes with horribly sharpened irons a while back and would like to finally use them. So I needed a grinding jig for my bench grinder so it doesn’t take forever on my coarse diamond stone getting the primary bevel done.

Not much too it really. Just threw it together. Instead of countersinking the screw heads, to bolt the grinder to the jig, I added a nut so it would stick out further to match up with the holes I drilled in my bench. Does a good job of keep the grinder from walking away since I don’t want it secured in place.

I noticed the tool holding slide has some figure to it. I rarely see that in cypress. Don’t know if it’s common. Neat though.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.





6 comments so far

View drobertson's profile

drobertson

57 posts in 2584 days


#1 posted 01-24-2015 02:39 AM

I have seen that style of figure in Cypress before. That wood was probably from a foot or two below a crotch or major branch. Not common, but it is out there.

I live in Florida and get Cypress for many of my projects. It is a great working wood. Relatively inexpensive, harder than pine, a very traditional wood grain and it smooths well. Lately it has been the go to wood for most of my projects. If you get the right piece (like you found), it can have some very nice grain patterns.

The only complaint I have about Cypress is that it can be a bit chippy, but that may be a reflection on my skill more than the wood itself.

Nice sharpening jig. Just one small warning you probably already know. Be careful to not overheat the blade with that coarse gray stone on the fixed speed grinder. If you grab a cheap variac at harbor freight you can slow the speed of your grinder down so you don’t blow the temper of your blade.

Best wishes on your sharpening project.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 954 days


#2 posted 01-24-2015 02:43 AM

Chippy? Ain’t that the truth. I am a huge fan of flat sawn cypress with some sound knots. The grain can get wild.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View drobertson's profile

drobertson

57 posts in 2584 days


#3 posted 02-03-2015 05:56 PM

Yeah, I give it a good soak of 50/50 real Tung Oil and Citrus solvent. Then a week or two later I give it a buffed wax coat. It comes out with a beautiful natural wood look and feel. It isn’t as durable as hardwoods, but for normal stuff it is a great wood.

I have to be pretty conscious of the chipping problem. I have learned to score every point where I could get tear out. That solved about 95% of the issues, but I still have some problems.

I can get Cypress pretty easily in Florida. I can ever get it rough right from the mills if I am willing to drive a bit. I have no idea what the access is like in the rest of the country.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

5765 posts in 954 days


#4 posted 02-03-2015 06:56 PM

I’ve only finished it with oil based poly, wax, and lacquer. The lacquer looks frickin awesome. Most of my wood is flat sawn which I love, but usually cups after dimensioning, which I hate. IVe heard of a couple people getting it up north, but I imagine it’s not widely available like it is in the southeast.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View drobertson's profile

drobertson

57 posts in 2584 days


#5 posted 02-25-2015 11:02 PM

Yeah, cypress does cup. That is one of the reasons I use the Tung oil/solvent mix. Tung oil, as opposed to linseed, will actually significantly reduce moisture uptake in the wood. The issue is you need to give it a real good soak, and that is where the lemon solvent comes in. A 50/50 cut of solvent and oil lets the oils penetrate pretty deep in the wood. I have done exploratory cuts on freshly soaked boards and was reasonably impressed at the depth of penetration. I have heard that you can warm up the mixture and get even better results, but I am lazy and haven’t tried that yet.

Note I get pretty liberal with the oil when I do this and it ain’t cheap. This process normally gets reserved for stuff I really care about.

So far it seems to reduce the normal warping I would expect to see. I could just be imagining this and have delusions that I solved the great board warping problem all by myself, but I am happy with the results.

The down side

View Fettler's profile

Fettler

200 posts in 1465 days


#6 posted 04-08-2015 10:40 PM

I put a OneWay Wolverwine on my grinder which is sorta pricey, make more sense to make your own. One advantage of having a steel guide is that it absorbs some of the heat. To that point, heat means a brittle edge. I use a coarse aluminum oxide grinding wheel which cuts just as fast but generates less heat:
http://amzn.com/B00P00NGUG

-- --Rob, Seattle, WA

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