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Crosscut sled

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Project by fred posted 2646 days ago 3904 views 15 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here is my version. I had previously made a panel cutting jig that worked very well. But I wanted to make a crosscut sled. Knowing that hardwood runners overtime can start to wobble, I used aluminum runners. The back or exit side has a box made with sliding dovetails so I can easily remove it for storage. The box top and end are of plexiglass so I can see the blade.

There is also a stop on the left side of the sled and a bolt in the table so it will stop when the piece has been cut. That way I don’t push to far and come out of the sled on the exit side.

I cut a t-slot on the back panel and put in a stop block for repetitive cuts. It works great.

-- Fred Childs, Pasadena, CA - - - Law of the Workshop: Any tool, when dropped, will roll to the least accessible corner.





16 comments so far

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1763 posts in 2688 days


#1 posted 2646 days ago

Very nice Fred. How big is it?

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View fred's profile

fred

256 posts in 2696 days


#2 posted 2646 days ago

18” front to back and almost 30” wide. The right side, as you are facing it is 1” past the runner and the left side is 1” past the table end so the stop will work. I wanted to be able to store it on the side of the tablesaw. I can move the stop block on the back fence to either side.

And thanks to you for posting your crosscut sled. That inspired me.

-- Fred Childs, Pasadena, CA - - - Law of the Workshop: Any tool, when dropped, will roll to the least accessible corner.

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2898 days


#3 posted 2646 days ago

Nice setup Fred.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Mario's profile

Mario

902 posts in 2650 days


#4 posted 2646 days ago

Very nice work.

-- Hope Never fails

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2909 days


#5 posted 2645 days ago

You did a nice job, Fred. You should have saved that nice plywood (with the nice wood grain) for a cabinet or something. Of course, it looks good on your sled, too.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View David's profile

David

1970 posts in 2737 days


#6 posted 2642 days ago

Fred -

Very nice. I like the safety box on the backside of the sled.

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

View Chip's profile

Chip

1904 posts in 2691 days


#7 posted 2641 days ago

Great piece Fred. Was thinking of offcentering mine like that but was afraid of it torqueing and not sliding properly. Does it give you any problems like that?

-- Better to say nothing and be thought the fool... then to speak and erase all doubt!

View fred's profile

fred

256 posts in 2696 days


#8 posted 2641 days ago

Chip -

I have not experienced a torqueing problem. The sled is on two runners. One in the miter slot on the left side of the blade and one in the miter slot on the right side of the blade. The sled is 1” past the runner on the right side and 1” past the table top on the left. I have cut 2” wide stock and also 17” wide pieces without a problem.

-- Fred Childs, Pasadena, CA - - - Law of the Workshop: Any tool, when dropped, will roll to the least accessible corner.

View Chip's profile

Chip

1904 posts in 2691 days


#9 posted 2641 days ago

Now I wish I had not centered mine to the runners because your’s is obviously better at holding longer pieces accurately and makes a lot more sense. Thanks for the input Fred.

-- Better to say nothing and be thought the fool... then to speak and erase all doubt!

View fred's profile

fred

256 posts in 2696 days


#10 posted 2641 days ago

Chip -

I am going to rebuild mine in the next few weeks. I will be using MDF for the sled since it is more stable than plywood and won’t twist or warp like plywood can do. That way I will have a very flat sled. I will still use plywood for the front and back fences.

-- Fred Childs, Pasadena, CA - - - Law of the Workshop: Any tool, when dropped, will roll to the least accessible corner.

View Chip's profile

Chip

1904 posts in 2691 days


#11 posted 2641 days ago

Fred, I made my base out of 3/4” MDF and the front and back fences out of maple and walnut. The runners are quarter sawn maple. It’s 24” & 40” and it weighs a ton. Not sure I would use the MDF again just because of the weight which is why I was curious about yours. Do you think 1/2” mdf would be thick enough? If so that would certainly cut down on the weight a bit.

-- Better to say nothing and be thought the fool... then to speak and erase all doubt!

View RickInTexas's profile

RickInTexas

45 posts in 2652 days


#12 posted 2641 days ago

Fred,
Very nice work. Did you use any type of finish on wood? Also, how did you connect the front and back fences to the bottom board?

For both you and Chip, my experience with 1/2” MDF is that even over a short distance unsupported, it will bow. I would worry about as you push through a board, the back end bowing and causing too much movement. Just my two cents.

Rick

-- Rick - Spring, TX

View Chip's profile

Chip

1904 posts in 2691 days


#13 posted 2641 days ago

Rick, that’s what I was kinda thinking and why I used the 3/4” on my present one. Just trying to think of some way to cut down on the weight. Thanks for the input.

-- Better to say nothing and be thought the fool... then to speak and erase all doubt!

View fred's profile

fred

256 posts in 2696 days


#14 posted 2640 days ago

Chip – I don’t have any 1/2” MDF so I will use some 3/4”. Since I store mine next to the table saw, I don’t anticipate the weight will matter that much to me especially since the fences are plywood. The current one is easily manageable. I have seen some sleds with 2×4 fences. Ideally, the bottom would be 1/2”. If it is too heavy then it makes sense that you would tend to use it less than if it was lighter and easier to move around.

Rick – No finish on the wood. I connected the front and back fences using screws from the bottom into the fences. I don’t think it will bow since the MDF is the bottom and supported by the tabletop and the runners and stiffened by the fences. I plan to use some slick stuff (whatever that is) on the bottom as described by Niki. Niki has about 3 or 4 different methods to reduce drag.

-- Fred Childs, Pasadena, CA - - - Law of the Workshop: Any tool, when dropped, will roll to the least accessible corner.

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13337 posts in 2271 days


#15 posted 1891 days ago

Nice Crosscut, Fred.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

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