LumberJocks

Wood Handled Macrame' Handbag - Wood Finishing Question

  • Advertise with us
Project by Diane posted 04-25-2007 10:16 PM 2773 views 0 times favorited 27 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Someone just gave me a nice kit to make a detailed Macrame’ bag. I got all the jute cut ready to Macrame’, imagine my excitement. The jute looks rough instead of smooth but it probably will still make a nice bag; what counts is I will than know how to Macrame’ bags with three diamond shapes on the body of it on each side.

The wood handles were very rough so I hand sanded and sanded until I out them smooth as I could. It wasn’t easy since the handles are made from a layered type wood so it isn’t a very good quality. I would guess the wood is oak.

I don’t know anything about finishes so I have a question about how to finish these wood handles. I read that some use oils and some others finishes so I want your advise. I realize it all depends on my taste but I don’t know enough about this to even know what would be my options. Just ask me whatever you need to ask.

Would this be considered a woodworking project that I could post as my first project? I’m not sure since all I will be doing is sanding and putting some kind of finish or oil on the handles.

Diane





27 comments so far

View PanamaJack's profile

PanamaJack

4473 posts in 2823 days


#1 posted 04-25-2007 10:37 PM

This might be a birch (Or other similar white-wood) plywood handle. I’m thinking you might want to put a sanding sealer on the wood so the stain will look the same throughout. Several light coats of a polyurethane can be sprayed on in a short amount of time to make a durable finish. (You might just apply a clear coat with out stain.) I’m not a pro, but this is what I have done for my wife who has made a couple of hand bags such as this here. She liked it that way anyway.

Wood is the starter, the Artist is the finisher. Put a wooden button on as the closer(?).

Good luck and tell how it turns out.

-- Carpe Lignum; Tornare Lignum (Seize the wood, to Turn the wood)

View Diane's profile

Diane

546 posts in 2869 days


#2 posted 04-25-2007 10:47 PM

I hadn’t thought of a closer on it, not sure I would care for that but I will keep it in mind, and if I do do that it would be wood. I have enough jute to make a macreme’ belt of some kind depending on how much jute I have to work with, that should would look nice to have a matching belt.

I guess I have the starts of my first project!

Diane

View Diane's profile

Diane

546 posts in 2869 days


#3 posted 04-26-2007 12:52 AM

I have a hardware store right near me I’ll have to look for their sanding sealer to get a better idea what it does. If I use polyurethane from a spray can can it chip off over time, I want handles that will look good for years to come since they can’t be redone later.

I’m looking forward to others ideas as well before I decide how I’m going to do this.

Diane

View Diane's profile

Diane

546 posts in 2869 days


#4 posted 04-26-2007 05:15 AM

I know this project doesn’t look that interesting from whatever everyone else is doing but I have to start somewhere. I hope someone posts what I might do with these handles. I don’t even know anything about staining anything.

The middle picture shows what it is suppose to look like. I added the jute in too so you can see what the texture and color looks like.

Diane

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1489 posts in 2871 days


#5 posted 04-26-2007 06:19 AM

Interesting point about not being able to refinish them.

Shellac should be fairly robust (as long as nobody spills alcohol on them…), but unlike polyurethane, shellac can be re-applied in small areas later, because the alcohol in shellac will resoften the existing shellac.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

View Diane's profile

Diane

546 posts in 2869 days


#6 posted 04-26-2007 06:29 AM

Dan thanks, that is interesting about the shellac.

I hear people use oil on wood can that be done alone and do a good job of protecting the wood?

Diane

View Phil Brown's profile

Phil Brown

219 posts in 2804 days


#7 posted 04-26-2007 08:17 AM

Spray lacquer is my favorite finish for small items.

-- Phil Brown, Ontario

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2993 days


#8 posted 04-26-2007 01:21 PM

I don’t know anything about macrame’ but the wood looks nice and the pieces match very well. Jockmike

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3045 days


#9 posted 04-26-2007 01:31 PM

One thing about using oil, you don’t have to worry about chipping off, & you can reapply oil whenever you want. Also oil is the easiest to apply. Most gunstocks have an oil finish.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Diane's profile

Diane

546 posts in 2869 days


#10 posted 04-26-2007 04:12 PM

Thanks Dick. What kind of oil should I get and let me know if it can be used alone or if I need to stain it or other first, how to apply it and what else I need to know? Also does it dry completely I don’t want to stain the Macreme’ that I’ve done? Thanks Phil that is good to know about the spray lacquer and thanks mike I think the pieces match well together too.

I want to get the handles done soon so I can start doing the Macrame’, I have never followed a pattern such as this before but surprisingly the directions are well written with diagrams. I went through the directions and I seem to understand how to do every step. I hadn’t done Macrame’ since a kid but the last few months I have been making Macrame’ belts one after the other and have practiced all the knots I will need in this project except the square knot.

I had to do many square knots though when I made the heddles for my Inkle loom. I’m picking up a book on weaving the Inkle loom today at the library, hopefully the directions are written as well as for this handbag so I will be on my way with the loom as well.

Diane

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3045 days


#11 posted 04-26-2007 05:11 PM

Just use either boiled linseed oil, or tung oil. You shouldn’t have to stain unless you want a darker color. The oil will darken it a little. Minwax has a combination stain ,& finish with a lot of different tints, if you want to go that route.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Diane's profile

Diane

546 posts in 2869 days


#12 posted 04-26-2007 05:24 PM

Thanks Dick, I believe I will be going with the oil and not using and tint.

This brings up another question, when I bought my dishwasher I was told to oil the wood top but I had no idea what oil to use. Could I use one or either of these oils to do this?

Diane

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3045 days


#13 posted 04-26-2007 06:14 PM

They recommended mineral oil for mine. You can buy that in the drugstore.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Diane's profile

Diane

546 posts in 2869 days


#14 posted 04-26-2007 06:29 PM

Thanks Dick.

Diane

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1489 posts in 2871 days


#15 posted 04-26-2007 11:06 PM

Diane, for surfaces that need to be food safe I’ve heard two suggestions: Mineral oil and walnut oil. Both are edible oils (barring severe nut allergies, walnut oil usually won’t bother people who just get canker sores from eating walnuts) that don’t go rancid.

I use walnut oil because it actually dries to a fairly hard surface, but I find that it does need to be re-applied regularly, at least to cutting boards and counter trim.

What I’ve heard about oil as a general finish (not just for food safe surfaces) is that you sand to a good smooth finish, then apply the oil, then sand from 400 on up as high as you want, and wax and buff it. Having seen this on various furniture this is the finish my sweety has requested for future furniture I build, and it’s really nice, but people say it takes a little more maintenance than a few layers of shellac.

On the other hand shellac can be fairly high gloss and have almost a plastic sheen, where as the oil finishes I’ve seen won’t be quite as reflective and seem a little more like an integral part of the wood rather than a finish.

All opinion and hearsay, your mileage will vary.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

showing 1 through 15 of 27 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase