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Router Jig For Planeing

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Project by ghazard posted 2060 days ago 12910 views 45 times favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Inspired by oldskoolmodder’s “Router Thickness “Planer” on the Cheap”, I did this so I could flatten cutting boards but I suspect it will come in handy for many other applications. Pretty simple concept. It took a little tweaking to get the rails level but a few pieces of electrical tape leveled it out quite well. The base is 3/4 ply. The vertical walls and frame for the rails are oak. Rails are steel angle I found in the back of the warehouse at work! I still need to take a cutoff wheel to the screws protruding from the rails. You’d think I would have done that after the first time I caught my finger on them…but the excitement of getting the jig to work kind of took over! I’ll post the cutting boards in a few days.

Thanks for looking!

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"





23 comments so far

View lew's profile

lew

9914 posts in 2338 days


#1 posted 2060 days ago

Nice setup!!

I thought about making something like this using drawer slides but there was too much “play” in the extension mechanism.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View PetVet's profile

PetVet

329 posts in 2070 days


#2 posted 2060 days ago

Nicely done. This actually can do a better job on your end grain cutting boards than a planer does, as the planer wants to tear out the trailing edge of the cutting boards. You will use this for more than just your cutting boards!

-- Rich in Richmond -- Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.

View oldskoolmodder's profile

oldskoolmodder

760 posts in 2262 days


#3 posted 2060 days ago

Hey no fair! Yours looks much sturdier than mine! Looks like it worked well for you!

-- Respect your shop tools and they will respect you - Ric

View ghazard's profile

ghazard

379 posts in 2092 days


#4 posted 2060 days ago

Thanks fellas, It did work nicely. The only thing I am going to add to it before the next time is a board to close up the left side. This is where all the chips get thrown and without a barrier chips are everywhere. I just leaned a board against the end for now and that helped keep about 90% of the chips inside the jig…much easier for cleanup.

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

View ghazard's profile

ghazard

379 posts in 2092 days


#5 posted 2060 days ago

Oh…I forgot to mention. $30 and it was done. You could do it cheaper if you cut your own components. I cheated and bought the wood already (and conveniently…) jointed and sized. Just a couple of cuts with the chop saw and boom.

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

View oldskoolmodder's profile

oldskoolmodder

760 posts in 2262 days


#6 posted 2060 days ago

That’s cheap enough. I’m thinking I’ll make some black walnut that I have laying around, but then it won’t be an on the cheap project! hahaha

-- Respect your shop tools and they will respect you - Ric

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11638 posts in 2270 days


#7 posted 2060 days ago

thank you for sharing the great idea : ) How thick of material could you plane with this ?

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View ghazard's profile

ghazard

379 posts in 2092 days


#8 posted 2060 days ago

Dusty…for reference the cutting board sitting in the jig was planed from 1.125” to a finished 1” as it is in the picture. The vertical walls are 3.75” tall…if I remember correctly, and are sitting on top of the base. So you could go almost up to that thickness of a workpiece. The base is a 24” x 48” “handi panel” from the local home improvement store. So capacity on this jig would be around 20” x 40” x 3.5”. That is leaving some room in all directions.

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

View SawdustMill's profile

SawdustMill

58 posts in 2315 days


#9 posted 2060 days ago

This is really cool.

It looks like you “clamp” the workpiece by screwing a frame around it, is that right ? I wonder if there’s a way to clamp it that doesn’t put holes in the bottom.

Thanks for sharing !

View ghazard's profile

ghazard

379 posts in 2092 days


#10 posted 2060 days ago

Sawdust, that is right. It works actually really well. You can see 3 small pieces of scrap screwed into the base on 3 sides. The near side has a block pinched between the workpiece and the near wall…not screwed. I found it easier to remove, flip and reinsert the workpiece if one side was removable. Not sure how you would do it if you couldn’t screw into the base…since you need unobstructed access to the top of the workpiece. I probably have 50 or 60 small holes in the base from where I’ve screwed in a holder and it doesn’t have any ill effect. I suspect at some point in the future I’ll have enough holes where the integrity of the base is compromised but I have to imagine that will be way in the future.

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

View oldskoolmodder's profile

oldskoolmodder

760 posts in 2262 days


#11 posted 2060 days ago

The beauty of this is that IF you do get more holes than you want, it’s easy to replace the bottom board/plywood or whatever you use. The thinnest I’ve gone (unintentionally, but it worked fine in the end) was 5/8” from just over an inch. It really depends on how you set your router and your bit for depth.

It’s possible that you could screw pieces in from the side, though I haven’t tried this and since it’s based on scraps as your holders, it may not be possible at all times to do it that way.

Glad you’re having fun with this one, and hope you’re making money from it, Ghazard.

-- Respect your shop tools and they will respect you - Ric

View woodworm's profile

woodworm

14124 posts in 2173 days


#12 posted 2060 days ago

Ghazard,
I think you are applying the most appropriate clamping technique for small and thin workpiece where using commercial clamps would be an obstruction. In this case, the scraps that act as clamps shall be thinner than the workpiece to be planed as to avoid cutting them too or worse than that cutting the screws.

Good job Ghazard, thanks for sharing.

-- masrol, kuala lumpur, MY.

View ghazard's profile

ghazard

379 posts in 2092 days


#13 posted 2060 days ago

My router is about maxed out in depth of cut to get the cutter down to a 1” workpiece thickness. If/when I need to plane thinner than that, I’ll make a new “sled” with an offset that drops the rails down in between the top of the walls. Or, I just replace the walls with shorter stock…drop the height by about an inch. Then I can get down really thin and still accommodate atleast 2.75”. Come to think of it…I should have done that in the first place! Oh well. Live and learn, right!

Oldskool…no money…just Christmas presents, for now! :)

-- "Hey, you dang woodchucks! Quit chuckin' my wood!"

View pyromedic602's profile

pyromedic602

164 posts in 2331 days


#14 posted 2060 days ago

Another grat jig to add to my collection that I want or need to build when I gat a chance. thanks for posting.

-- Pyromedic602, free wood is always good wood

View Praki's profile

Praki

196 posts in 2579 days


#15 posted 2059 days ago

Nice jig. What type of router bit do you use with this?

-- Praki, Aspiring Woodworker

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