LumberJocks

A box is a box.....Not

  • Advertise with us
Project by Neil Davis posted 12-19-2014 02:28 PM 1981 views 5 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My first consignment project. Made from cabinet grade 3/4 ply with Pironite coating, similar to Formica. It originally had a single piece hinged lid but they felt that it was too heavy to lift so I modified to the dual hinged lid. This project required a lot of fore thought as I had to have the coating on it but not block my ability to screw it together. It took 6 sheets of 3/4 60×60 ply and a single sheet of 1/2 60×60 ply and three white 4×8 sheets and 2 red 4×8 sheets of the Pironite. There are 270 degree hinges on the back corner so that the lids can be swung back out of the way to access down through the top of the cabinet. This box houses electronic equipment such as printers and other computer hardware. They ultimately want two of them and I am hoping that the next one is a smoother process now that I have the basic process down. I had originally thought that perhaps I would like to do woodworking for a living but now am having second thoughts. It seems to take some of the fun out of it when you have deadlines and customer requirements, proposals, estimates and multiples of the same item.





13 comments so far

View ohwoodeye's profile

ohwoodeye

1742 posts in 2620 days


#1 posted 12-19-2014 02:47 PM

Pretty cool looking non-box. With that small 45 degree snip off the top front sides, isn’t there a small triangle hole on each side of the box when the lid is closed?

-- Directions are just the Manufacturer's opinion on how something should be assembled. ----Mike, Waukesha, WI

View Neil Davis's profile

Neil Davis

39 posts in 2064 days


#2 posted 12-19-2014 03:02 PM

Yes, that is true about the corner, but the customer is always right….right? That is what they wanted.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7487 posts in 1474 days


#3 posted 12-19-2014 03:16 PM

I hear you about not doing it for a living. Back when I worked at the big orange box I used to make 10 or 12 items to give away each month for our “Ladies Night Workshop”. Bird houses, cutting boards, small tables, lamps and walking sticks (just to name a few).

After most every meeting there would be SOMEone who would approach me asking if I’d make an item and they’d pay. My response was always the same … “This is a hobby. I LOVE making things and giving them away. I love seeing the looks on your faces when your name is drawn from the bucket. But if I start making these things for pay, it will become a JOB. I’ll always have to make sure I get “X” number of things built each month and eventually I will learn to hate it. When someone wins a bird house in a drawing, they’re thrilled at how cute it is. But if someone is paying me to build that same house, I dont want them coming back asking if I can change the color or change this or that because it wasn’t quite what they pictured. So no, I’m sorry, but I wont take your money and build you one of those. Just keep coming back every month and eventually your name will be drawn and you’ll win one.”

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

115204 posts in 3044 days


#4 posted 12-19-2014 03:26 PM

Cool design Neil nice job.

You are so right Joe.

I agree woodworking for a living you don’t always get to have fun and you definitely don’t get to make what you want.When LJ members or students ask me about tips for getting into the woodworking business the first thing I say is don’t wreck a wonderful hobby by trying to make it a business.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7487 posts in 1474 days


#5 posted 12-19-2014 03:45 PM

”don’t wreck a wonderful hubby by trying to make it a business”

THAT just might become a sign in my shop! I love it! (except I’ll change hubby into hobby :-)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

115204 posts in 3044 days


#6 posted 12-19-2014 03:48 PM

oops thanks Joe

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View longgone's profile

longgone

5688 posts in 2775 days


#7 posted 12-19-2014 04:24 PM

Very nice and well built box. The red color looks good makes it stand out.
I have been woodworking most of my life both as a living and for just for fun. I love every moment of it.

For me personally, doing what I really enjoy and want to do in life is what I consider living

I never had that dream non-woodworking job that so many people passionately look forward to waking up and doing each and every day….regardless of it being for themselves or employed by someone else. For those that have this other job I say great… but for me it has always been woodworking and being my own boss..

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

115204 posts in 3044 days


#8 posted 12-19-2014 04:58 PM

Greg
Not sure if you’re referring to my comment or not,but I have been self-employed for40+years and I certainly don’t dream of working for others. My comment about” don’t wreck a good hobby” is meant for those who already have a good paying job and are talking about quitting their job to do woodworking. Even when you are a successful woodworker most individuals don’t not make a fortune in woodworking unless your a Thomas Moser .So they should enjoy the hobby ,with out the hassle of dealing with customers and pressures of being in business.
From what I’ve seen on Ljs of your work.I think you have taken the correct route in woodworking,specializing in a product , When specialising you can work on deviations on one or two themes and keep improving your products and techniques
In my opinion Greg You have the most ideal situation where you make what you like and people buy it. That’s great,kudos to you for your great success .
Merry Christmas

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View longgone's profile

longgone

5688 posts in 2775 days


#9 posted 12-19-2014 11:42 PM



Greg
Not sure if you re referring to my comment or not,but I have been self-employed for40+years and I certainly don t dream of working for others. My comment about” don t wreck a good hobby” is meant for those who already have a good paying job and are talking about quitting their job to do woodworking. Even when you are a successful woodworker most individuals don t not make a fortune in woodworking unless your a Thomas Moser .So they should enjoy the hobby ,with out the hassle of dealing with customers and pressures of being in business.
From what I ve seen on Ljs of your work.I think you have taken the correct route in woodworking,specializing in a product , When specialising you can work on deviations on one or two themes and keep improving your products and techniques
In my opinion Greg You have the most ideal situation where you make what you like and people buy it. That s great,kudos to you for your great success .
Merry Christmas

- a1Jim


Jim…I was not referring to your post at all but to how I feel about what I do. I’ve always believed that a niche’ market and specializing is the best way to stay busy, have fun and not be in a super competitive area of woodworking. I spent many years restoring and renovating old wood yachts and sail boats in a market with just a very few people around that were doing the same type of work. The creative challenge always kept it fun and interesting.. This also gave me the ability to use a lot of exotic woods that were affordable and available at the time.
This background has hopefully helped the design influence of the work I now do with the sculpting and compound curves. At 67 I like to build things that I can easily pick up and carry….
I hope you and your family have a very Merry Christmas…!

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

115204 posts in 3044 days


#10 posted 12-20-2014 12:07 AM

Greg, Boy are you old :) (same as me) I know your a talented guy with a great shop and smart about how you do business,to bad we all don’t fall into that category.Keep the good work.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View LeroyTheLips's profile

LeroyTheLips

248 posts in 1714 days


#11 posted 12-20-2014 12:59 AM

Really, really nice. Love the design and color. A work of art!

View klassenl's profile

klassenl

170 posts in 2126 days


#12 posted 12-20-2014 01:02 AM

I read some where that when you try to make money from your hobby you lose your hobby.

-- When questioned about using glue on a garbage bin I responded, "Wood working is about good technique and lots of glue........I have the glue part down."

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2635 posts in 2575 days


#13 posted 12-20-2014 03:00 AM


My first consignment project. Made from cabinet grade 3/4 ply with Pironite coating, similar to Formica. It originally had a single piece hinged lid but they felt that it was too heavy to lift so I modified to the dual hinged lid. This project required a lot of fore thought as I had to have the coating on it but not block my ability to screw it together. It took 6 sheets of 3/4 60×60 ply and a single sheet of 1/2 60×60 ply and three white 4×8 sheets and 2 red 4×8 sheets of the Pironite. There are 270 degree hinges on the back corner so that the lids can be swung back out of the way to access down through the top of the cabinet. This box houses electronic equipment such as printers and other computer hardware. They ultimately want two of them and I am hoping that the next one is a smoother process now that I have the basic process down. I had originally thought that perhaps I would like to do woodworking for a living but now am having second thoughts. It seems to take some of the fun out of it when you have deadlines and customer requirements, proposals, estimates and multiples of the same item.

- Neil Davis

That is a nice looking cabinet, even it it would not be my style. I worked as a mechanic for many years, and then as a mechanical engineer for more years. There is a certain amount of satisfaction from doing auto repairs and then doing some hot rodding, and making a living at it. Deadlines are a fact of life, and if you don’t want to sully your hobby with them, just don’t do it. You will find that as you gain experience, your speed will increase. Also, your ability to spot customers who will be a pill and slow you down so that you don’t make money will increase. If you do good work and live in a large enough area, you could make a living at it.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com