LumberJocks

Small buffet table

  • Advertise with us
Project by Earache posted 12-16-2014 02:05 AM 865 views 4 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Wife wanted a small side buffet table for the dining room. I happened to have some more 2’ X 6” red oak lying around so I cut some to length and the glued up a top. She wanted a rather small frame and legs for it, so I went with .1875” X 2.00” hot roll steel flats with one 90 degrees to the other. Formed an X leg system for it. Legs were then powdercoated a matte black.

Top is roughly 42” wide by 18” deep, 2.000” thick. Light stain and polyurethane finish.
Perfect fit along a small wall in the dining room.

This was a quick and easy project that made the wife very happy. Win / win!

-- Eric - Littleton, Colorado





7 comments so far

View Texcaster's profile

Texcaster

1139 posts in 1137 days


#1 posted 12-16-2014 07:07 AM

A very tidy design, good work.

-- Mama calls me Texcaster but my real name is Mr. Earl.

View Earache's profile

Earache

31 posts in 722 days


#2 posted 12-16-2014 12:44 PM



A very tidy design, good work.

- Texcaster

Thanks Bill. I really like the industrial look, but am looking for ways to make the wood portions of my furniture ideas to look like something more than just a slab of wood. I don’t really want to use a router to put a different edge on the slabs, but I do want to do something to make them look more “finished”.

Hoping I get some ideas and criticisms from more experienced woodworkers here.

-- Eric - Littleton, Colorado

View tool_junkie's profile

tool_junkie

294 posts in 1992 days


#3 posted 12-16-2014 04:37 PM

I really like your design. Nicely executed!

Did you powder coat it yourself? How easy is that process?

View Earache's profile

Earache

31 posts in 722 days


#4 posted 12-16-2014 05:06 PM


I really like your design. Nicely executed!

Did you powder coat it yourself? How easy is that process?

- tool_junkie

Thanks, TJ.

Yes, I powdercoat my own stuff. Having it done would add significant cost to the stools.
My oven is an old converted heat treating oven. I converted it from 460V 3 Phase to 220 single phase by gutting it and then installing home oven heating units. Works great…

If you look closely, you can see the rails on the insides of the oven. I make a rack specifically for each thing I need to coat. The racks hold the part why I apply the powder and while I slide it into/out of the oven. Works pretty well and is easy enough to do.

The oven is 36” X 36” X 36” inside, so I can do anything that will fit in there. Slightly longer pieces can be done by tilting them on their racks, etc.

Applying the powder is very easy – a gun holds the powder and charges the metal so that a static charge makes the powder stick to the metal. Once in the oven, it turns to a liquid. 20 minutes of curing time and it’s ready to come out of the oven to cool. Then it’s ready to go.

-- Eric - Littleton, Colorado

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9139 posts in 2331 days


#5 posted 12-17-2014 09:42 AM

Simple, classy and elegant.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View Earache's profile

Earache

31 posts in 722 days


#6 posted 12-17-2014 03:12 PM


Simple, classy and elegant.

- majuvla

Thanks Majuvla – that’s exactly what I was going for!

-- Eric - Littleton, Colorado

View tool_junkie's profile

tool_junkie

294 posts in 1992 days


#7 posted 12-17-2014 03:38 PM

Earache,

Thanks for the information on your powder coating setup. Seems like it is not as difficult a process as I initially thought. If I can snag a “throw away” type oven, I think I would like to try it as well!

Thanks!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com