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pallet wood epoxy top coffee table

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Project by kirbi69 posted 12-02-2014 02:46 AM 3713 views 7 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A table made from an old pallet, and covered in a gallon of famawood glaze coat. Rough cedar border and legs, Osb underside, and pine base frame. This thing is solid as a roxk and weighs about 50 lbs. Originaly built to sell, but the wife likes it too much lol





13 comments so far

View MrGoodCat's profile

MrGoodCat

73 posts in 1094 days


#1 posted 12-02-2014 02:57 AM

Nice work. Great use of pallet wood.

-- I dream of a world where a chicken can cross the road without having their motives questioned.

View ajw1978's profile

ajw1978

163 posts in 882 days


#2 posted 12-02-2014 08:57 AM

I just showed this to the boss lady—who has been waiting for me to build a table since I first used it as an excuse to buy a miter saw last spring—and all she wants to know about is the dog.

sigh.

-- May the good Lord help me if I ever actually have a shop, garage or basement.

View Rick's profile

Rick

8287 posts in 2493 days


#3 posted 12-02-2014 09:05 PM

Nice Table! Very unique design.

-- Hope Everyone Is Doing Well! .... Best Regards: Rick

View LJRay's profile

LJRay

93 posts in 966 days


#4 posted 12-02-2014 11:09 PM

Very nice

-- Ray

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9098 posts in 2328 days


#5 posted 12-03-2014 07:49 AM

I like it’s simplicity.Well done.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View StillTooShort's profile

StillTooShort

7 posts in 730 days


#6 posted 12-05-2014 03:47 AM

Epic pallet project. Did you do one heavy coat of the Famowood using the cedar to contain it, or multiples?

-- This Signature Intentionally Left Blank.

View kirbi69's profile

kirbi69

80 posts in 1044 days


#7 posted 12-05-2014 04:04 AM

It was two pours. The first pour was about 3 quarts, enough to fill in between all the spaces and put about a 1/8 inch thick coat ( to make sure all the highspots were covered. )

Then the second coat was added to make the top perfectly equal to the height of the cedar border, and foam brushed the sides.

One thing i learmed is that i should have put a first thin coat on to seal the wood, because there were a couple small spots that were producing bubbles, im guessing from mold or bacteria…

Another tip i learned from past projects is to use plywood underneith, and use plenty of glue to attach the border, and also run a bead of hot glue around the bottom edge, to seal it up good. This epoxy may look thick, but it will find any tiny hole to seep through.

View kirbi69's profile

kirbi69

80 posts in 1044 days


#8 posted 12-05-2014 04:07 AM

View StillTooShort's profile

StillTooShort

7 posts in 730 days


#9 posted 12-05-2014 04:29 AM



It was two pours. The first pour was about 3 quarts, enough to fill in between all the spaces and put about a 1/8 inch thick coat ( to make sure all the highspots were covered. )

Then the second coat was added to make the top perfectly equal to the height of the cedar border, and foam brushed the sides.

One thing i learmed is that i should have put a first thin coat on to seal the wood, because there were a couple small spots that were producing bubbles, im guessing from mold or bacteria…

Another tip i learned from past projects is to use plywood underneith, and use plenty of glue to attach the border, and also run a bead of hot glue around the bottom edge, to seal it up good. This epoxy may look thick, but it will find any tiny hole to seep through.

- kirbi69

Very cool. I’m at the start (gathering materials) of a rather ambitious desk project, the top of which will be made of varied-length pallet wood that has been sanded, dyed and sealed. Still trying to determine if a few good coats of poly will do the trick, or if I want to go crazy and do sweet glaze job like yours. It’s a commitment because the edge of the top will be banded in oak, and i’d have to make a judgement about how proud it should be to contain the applied epoxy.

Sketchup grab for an idea of what I mean.

-- This Signature Intentionally Left Blank.

View kirbi69's profile

kirbi69

80 posts in 1044 days


#10 posted 12-05-2014 04:34 AM

If you are sanding it smooth, that means you can make the top perfectly flat and level.

That means you wont need to make the edge banding proud at all, if you can let the epoxy run off and drip off the sided.

View kirbi69's profile

kirbi69

80 posts in 1044 days


#11 posted 12-05-2014 04:41 AM

Heres a nightstand i made where the epoxy just flowed over the edge.

View StillTooShort's profile

StillTooShort

7 posts in 730 days


#12 posted 12-05-2014 04:55 AM



Heres a nightstand i made where the epoxy just flowed over the edge.

- kirbi69

Did you spend a lot of time sanding down the drips?

-- This Signature Intentionally Left Blank.

View kirbi69's profile

kirbi69

80 posts in 1044 days


#13 posted 12-05-2014 01:50 PM

Not too long i think. If it was a PITA i would have remembered it better. But i dont think it was that bad

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