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Camping Chair

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Project by KnickKnack posted 10-30-2008 03:11 PM 6830 views 33 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’ve seen quite a few of these “2 piece, thread through” chairs when I lived in West Africa, and I fancied having a go at making one. After some experimentation on some pine destined for the bonfire (wood-worm), I got the sizes and hole positioning right and made this one in ash, with a linseedoil/varnish/meths finish.
In Africa they’re usually carved, which I’d intended to do, having never tried that, but I think it’s better plane (pun intended) and simple. The African’s don’t do the gothic thing much either, but I just love the lines of the gothic arch and I couldn’t resist.
It’s quite comfortable, but you have be careful getting in and out to keep your weight at the back – now I have only to make one more for the wife and wait 6 months for some good weather to see how they’re received at a campsite.
My kind of woodwork – no joints, no glue, nothing to mess up except for the hole, which, you guessed it, isn’t great – the next one will be better.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."





12 comments so far

View sharad's profile

sharad

1112 posts in 3615 days


#1 posted 10-30-2008 03:31 PM

Superb creation. So simple but so cute. The arches give more expression to the chair. The stool in the corner is also very special. Have you constructed it? Pl give the dimentions of the chair for us to try. Sharad

-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View Gregh11's profile

Gregh11

17 posts in 3335 days


#2 posted 10-30-2008 03:53 PM

Very interesting. The creativity on some of these projects, like this one, is very inspiring! Thanks for posting.

-- Greg, in Ozark, MO

View KnickKnack's profile

KnickKnack

1087 posts in 3377 days


#3 posted 10-30-2008 04:15 PM

The drawing is …

All measurements in milimetres.
The 2 critical numbers are the hole height (21) and seat strip length (65). These can be changed a bit, which changes the angles, but you need to be careful or the thing doesn’t “stay together”. It needs to be fairly tight in the hole – slips in/out easily, but doesn’t slop about.

(I did make the stool during my “weird ways to add legs” phase :-), but didn’t think it worthy of posting)

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2656 posts in 3337 days


#4 posted 10-30-2008 04:21 PM

Great idea! I have got to try this one. Question: Could a square of wood with the same size hole be slipped onto the the back leg and wedged as the fron for stability?

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View mmh's profile

mmh

3675 posts in 3533 days


#5 posted 10-30-2008 04:22 PM

Very Nice! I like the simplicity and yet one can take this and go many directions. I’ve also admired the African chairs and they looked sturdy despite the simple design.

Thank you for sharing your construction information. I may have to try one of these soon. See you at the camp site with folding chair in hand!

-- "They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." ~ Edgar Allan Poe

View TedM's profile

TedM

2002 posts in 3543 days


#6 posted 10-30-2008 04:56 PM

Looks great! Thanks for sharing, especially the notes.

-- I'm a wood magician... I can turn fine lumber into firewood before your very eyes! - Please visit http://www.woodworkersguide.com and sign up for my project updates!

View sharad's profile

sharad

1112 posts in 3615 days


#7 posted 10-30-2008 05:02 PM

Thank you for providing the drawing and dimentions.
Sharad

-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)'s profile

Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)

176 posts in 3761 days


#8 posted 10-30-2008 05:55 PM

These are very popular in the Renaissance Fair scene. My wife made me go to one a couple weekends ago and all of the people had them. Most were made from the treated lumber you find at the lumber yards and then painted.

View KnickKnack's profile

KnickKnack

1087 posts in 3377 days


#9 posted 10-30-2008 07:56 PM

Kindlingmaker – not sure I understand – you mean like a “ring” on the back? The stability problem is mainly in tipping forward – which you get because the seat extends “too far” over where the back meets the ground. A slightly higher hole would improve this, but at the expense of a back that leans back more. A similar effect with a shorter “stick” on the seat. It’s all about the relative length of the stick and the vertical positioning of the hole. I didn’t want it too laid back, so I experimented and came up with those numbers. Side to side isn’t much of an issue.

Tearen – you have any pics or web sites with pics? – I’d be interested to see (although painting wood always seems like sacrilege to me)

Oh, and the measurements are centimetres and not millimetres!

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

View Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)'s profile

Dustin Ward (aka Tearen)

176 posts in 3761 days


#10 posted 10-31-2008 02:34 PM

I will ask the wife if she can find the pictures she took. I will also ask the students that organized the festival. Someone should have at least a couple pics. I will post or link them when I get them.

View trifern's profile

trifern

8135 posts in 3578 days


#11 posted 10-31-2008 11:49 PM

Cool project, thanks for sharing.

-- My favorite piece is my last one, my best piece is my next one.

View Colin's profile

Colin

246 posts in 3731 days


#12 posted 11-01-2008 10:43 AM

I like the simplicity, I shall have a go at this soon.

-- Colin, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. "Every craftsman was once an amateur"

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