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Chaotic Cutting Boards

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Project by gabriellus posted 11-09-2014 11:56 AM 2241 views 4 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The idea and general methodology came from this video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3uYaPgesp0

The walnut, ash, and one of the types of maple came from the lumberyard. The mahogany was actually reclaimed drawer box material, and the other maple was reclaimed flooring. All told for the 2 finished boards, probably like $40 or so, maybe less than that. Oh I bought some glue and extra clamps. Maybe not $40 then :)

I strayed from the video in a few ways. Firstly, I had to fake the 5 degree cuts with my crosscut sled, but it worked well enough. The video also never spelled out how much dry time he allots between each glue up, and using TB3 I gave each round of cuts about an hour. The rough assembly took a workday in all.

Also, and I can hear the flame war a brewin’, I sent each board through my thickness planer for the final squaring/flattening up. I constructed sacrificial pine rails that sat proud of both sides of the cutting boards, that way I could take off increments of a little pine at a time until I hit the hardwood, then lower the increments even more until the surface was flat and the glue was gone. Turn over, repeat. Many many passes, but flat as Kansas when done. The rails also eliminate any possibility of snipe, and most importantly they hold the boards together when the planer holds on a little long during a pass. These cutting boards can blow apart pretty easily when they get stuck in a thickness planer, and I was desperate for that not to happen.

I had a few gaps in the seams (this can happen if you clamp too hard and squeeze out too much glue, as I read about only after, duh!), so I took some of the sawdust, blendered it to a light dust, and mixed it to a paste with TB3. I smeared the gaps with the paste, let it dry, and sanded the boards down 80-150-220. Worked pretty well.

Finished with 3 coats of mineral oil. The colors and grains just went BOOM when the oil went on. The rubber feet are on order, but I didn’t want to wait to post the project.

So yeah, being the first end grain boards I’ve made, I’m really happy with how they turned out. I’m amazed at how beautiful the end grain of ash is, as well as the mahogany. They are to be holiday gifts for family that traditionally are impossible to shop for. Nailed it.





7 comments so far

View flwoodhacker's profile

flwoodhacker

57 posts in 2386 days


#1 posted 11-09-2014 12:45 PM

Impressive. Great job.
Question…where did you order the rubber feet from?

View Jim Sellers's profile

Jim Sellers

396 posts in 1796 days


#2 posted 11-09-2014 12:50 PM

Nice looking boards and very innovative plan of attack to get em through the planer. I just mad my first end grain boards and without a drum sander thought of doing the same. Thought I could get them smooth with belt sander. I did it but it sure was a lot of work.

-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.

View gabriellus's profile

gabriellus

47 posts in 838 days


#3 posted 11-09-2014 02:28 PM

The feet – rockler via amazon

The word “innovative” is a little disingenuous, I didn’t think of it.

http://youtu.be/QJ2LSj4RhAs

That guy is a master.

View gabriellus's profile

gabriellus

47 posts in 838 days


#4 posted 11-09-2014 02:31 PM



Nice looking boards and very innovative plan of attack to get em through the planer. I just mad my first end grain boards and without a drum sander thought of doing the same. Thought I could get them smooth with belt sander. I did it but it sure was a lot of work.

- Jim Sellers


I saw those boards, they’re stunning.

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

9120 posts in 2328 days


#5 posted 11-09-2014 05:37 PM

I think chaotic is sometimes complicated than ’’normal’’.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View Dabcan's profile

Dabcan

252 posts in 2132 days


#6 posted 11-10-2014 02:03 AM

I stick mine through the planer, just take light passes, chamfer the back edge to prevent blowout, and most importantly, don’t stand in front of the planer (ie. line of fire). I only had it happen once, sure was glad I wasn’t standing in the way…

-- @craftcollectif , http://www.craftcollective.ca, https://www.etsy.com/shop/craftcollective?

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3389 posts in 1634 days


#7 posted 11-10-2014 10:42 PM

Finely crafted and truly unique pattern! Well done.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

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