LumberJocks

The freight train (Shooting plane and shooting board)

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Project by lumberjoe posted 10-20-2014 03:57 PM 6563 views 29 times favorited 24 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I use a shooting board a lot. Having had some experience with what is comfortable and reliable for me to use, I decided to build a dedicated plane.

I call this the freight train because it is chunky, heavy, and unapologetic. It’s made from yellow birch and has about 4lbs of lead from an old drift bar inside it.

I am left handed and the plane is set up as such. I like the handle toward the rear, so I put it fairly far back. I left a bit of tail on it knowing it’s fairly fragile and will likely break, but I like the aesthetic, The front is shaped so it will fit my palm and I have an area to wrap my fingers around – but still leave as much mass as possible.

The iron is really nice. A friend from the UK sent it to me. It’s an old Sorbys tapered iron. 2.5” wide and brand new. It’s never been used (“New Old Stock”) and still had the factory hollow grind. I did extend the quartersawn maple wedge down a little further than I normally do to prevent some chatter since I am not using a cap iron.

The shooting board is also a custom design. I inset some T-track and use hold downs. This lets me keep both hands on the plane and holds the work securely. I was simply going to use a holdfast, but this is better. If I need to make any adjustments to the piece I am shooting, some light taps with a dead blow are all I need. Also I can hold pieces that I am shooting the edges of.

Most of the construction was done with hand tools:

Rough cutting the laminations. The lumber mill had this marked at beech, which is fine with me because it’s half the price of Birch

The stock was prepped with the other planes I made:

Close up of the iron:

It works really well. Here are some end grain shavings from a piece of Koa:

And here is a 7.5” wide piece of pine. Dead square

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/





24 comments so far

View jmartel's profile (online now)

jmartel

6575 posts in 1616 days


#1 posted 10-20-2014 04:01 PM

Very nice. I don’t think I’ve seen a dedicated wooden shooting plane before.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View bobasaurus's profile

bobasaurus

2673 posts in 2650 days


#2 posted 10-20-2014 04:05 PM

Excellent job. I’ve never seen a hand-made wooden shooting plane before. What angle is the blade bedded at? With your hold downs, do you use two hands on the plane?

-- Allen, Colorado

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1714 days


#3 posted 10-20-2014 04:07 PM

Bed angle is roughly 40 degrees. I designed the shooting board so I can keep both hands on the plane. I think I am going to move the stop back a few inches so I have a little more fence behind the work piece

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

8751 posts in 1305 days


#4 posted 10-20-2014 04:08 PM

Sweet! Joe! I am in the process of building a shooting board and planning the plane in my head! Favoriting this! Thanks for sharing.

-- God bless, Candy

View jmartel's profile (online now)

jmartel

6575 posts in 1616 days


#5 posted 10-20-2014 04:18 PM

How did you decide on 40 degrees? I would think that you would want a lower angle blade for end grain?

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

View JayT's profile

JayT

4785 posts in 1677 days


#6 posted 10-20-2014 04:29 PM

Looks good, joe. Should serve you well for many years.


How did you decide on 40 degrees? I would think that you would want a lower angle blade for end grain?

- jmartel

Anything under 45 is considered a low angle plane, jmart. 40 degrees bevel down gives a pretty similar attack angle as a metal bevel up low angle plane that a lot of people like for shooting. Those are generally bedded at 12 degrees, plus the 25 degree bevel and you get a 37 degree attack angle. I did the same thing when building a low angle wooden block plane.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2308 posts in 2299 days


#7 posted 10-20-2014 04:35 PM

Wonderful for a freighter, the more I see you guys posting about shooting boards the more I feel like I need one of these tools too.
BTW I guess you meant “lead” as in heavy f*ck!n’ metal, right?

-- Thomas - Pondering the inclusion of woodworking into physics and chemistry classes...

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1714 days


#8 posted 10-20-2014 04:47 PM

Thanks JT. 40 degrees is really the lowest I wanted to go. Anything less your don’t have much wood left under the blade. My plan was to back bevel the iron if I needed to, but even with full 1 inch thick Koa end grain, a sharp iron and a lot of mass plows right through.

I spent a lot of time on the teak cross pin and the wedge to make sure they were perfect so I could get really light cuts.

A tapered plane iron responds really well to mallet strikes. I plan on using those for any plane I build from now on.So much better than a non-tapered iron.

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

7176 posts in 2042 days


#9 posted 10-20-2014 04:57 PM

I like the hold downs on your excellent shooting board,

great planes as well LumberJoe good job!

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

5811 posts in 1758 days


#10 posted 10-20-2014 05:01 PM

Very nicely done. I like the idea of making your own, dedicated “Shooting Plane”, especially being able to weight and balance if you your own preferences.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2033 days


#11 posted 10-20-2014 05:02 PM

It looks good Joe. It looks well designed and sturdy.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7174 posts in 2263 days


#12 posted 10-20-2014 05:03 PM

Very nice Joe. I have one on my list but it may be a ways off.
..... Looks like you’re out of plane logos….... Hmmmmm

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2893 posts in 1714 days


#13 posted 10-20-2014 05:14 PM

You are correct Paul. The last one is on my frame saw

-- https://pinepointwoodworks.wordpress.com/

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1177 posts in 1179 days


#14 posted 10-20-2014 06:12 PM

Wow.
Lovely stuff.
Like the shape and the look.
Seeing projects like this allways makes me put yet another point on my to-make-ine-the-shop-as-soon-as-possible-projects..
Thanks for sharing!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

8122 posts in 1917 days


#15 posted 10-20-2014 06:49 PM

Joe, nice work. Looks like fun plane to use.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

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