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Bathroom Trays With Inlay

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Project by Mean_Dean posted 09-27-2014 01:10 AM 1857 views 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

These trays are built to hold various bathroom items such as lotion dispensers, toothbrush holders, and etc.

The first tray is made out of Luan mahogany, with black walnut inlay. The second tray is made out of Peruvian walnut, with white oak inlay. They are finished with home-brewed wiping varnish, using oil-based semi-gloss polyurethane thinned by half with mineral spirits. They are lined with dark brown faux suede fabric.

The trays measure: 11 1/2”L x 9 1/4”W x 2 1/4”H.

And now for the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly….....

The Good: The finish! I love wiping varnish! Just brush it on, let it sit for 3-4 minutes, then wipe the excess off. It’s a little slower build, but there are no runs, sags, or dust nibs. After it’s fully cured, lightly rub it with a brown paper bag, and it’s smooth as silk!

Also, I really love my Wixey digital angle gauge! 45-degree miters are dead-on first time, every time—no fooling around!

The Bad: I used splines to reinforce the miter joints, and in one of the joints in the walnut tray, there is a slight gap where I think the spline is just a hair narrower that it should have been. Naturally, I didn’t notice this until it was glued up….......

The Ugly: The inlays…...

I’ve never done inlays, and wanted to give them a try. And they’re not absolutely perfect. When routing out the groove for the inlays on a couple of the work pieces, the piece must have slipped a little on the router table, leaving small imperfections in the grooves. One of the grooves went a hair longer that it should have. In my defense however, the work pieces were on the smaller side, and I was routing them on the router table by hand, not using push pads, and wanted to be very sure not to get my fingers anywhere near the router bit! So, my being careful may have caused the imperfect grooves. Also, cutting the inlay pieces to exact length was a lot of trial and error, error being the operative word! I have a much greater respect for all of you who do inlays and marquetry so well!

As always, comments and questions are always appreciated!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN





11 comments so far

View Jim Sellers's profile

Jim Sellers

445 posts in 2480 days


#1 posted 09-27-2014 01:44 AM

Looks good to me. You’re probably the only one to notice the imperfections.

-- J.C.Sellers, Norcross, Ga. Just cut it right the first time. The best carpenters make the fewest chips.

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

10419 posts in 1985 days


#2 posted 09-27-2014 10:41 PM

These look really nice, Dean! How will they stand up up the wet environment in the bathroom? Intact fingers mean you can work on improving! Thanks for sharing.

-- God bless, Candy

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

6881 posts in 3292 days


#3 posted 09-28-2014 02:03 AM

Jim: Thanks for the compliment—and yeah, I probably am my own worst critic!

Candy: Thank you also! As far as bathroom use, they are basically encased in polyurethane, and should be exposed only to some steam, so they should hold up. As far as intact fingers—you’re an emergency room nurse, right? You guys can just sew those puppies back on, and they’re good as new, right?!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

View CFrye's profile

CFrye

10419 posts in 1985 days


#4 posted 09-28-2014 02:02 PM

”You guys can just sew those puppies back on, and they’re good as new, right?!”
Sure thing, Dean! You don’t mind if they get a little mixed up in the process, do you? After all, a finger is a finger, right?
;-b

-- God bless, Candy

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

32083 posts in 3012 days


#5 posted 09-28-2014 02:14 PM

These are very attractive.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- helluvawreck aka Charles, http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

6881 posts in 3292 days


#6 posted 09-28-2014 10:11 PM

Candy: Yeah, OK, I promise not to saw off any digits….....!

Charles: Thank you very much! They look even better in the bathrooms!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

5811 posts in 2437 days


#7 posted 09-29-2014 04:19 PM

Very attractive and nicely done.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View Mahini's profile

Mahini

20 posts in 1488 days


#8 posted 10-27-2014 09:21 PM

Wow, wow, wow. I love the inlays. Gotta try them.

View Chris McDowell's profile

Chris McDowell

644 posts in 2298 days


#9 posted 12-24-2014 02:08 AM

Very sharp. I love the Peruvian walnut! I think you did an exceptional job on the inlay regardless of how you feel about it.

I love my digital angle gauge, too!

-- Chris, http://www.youtube.com/CMRwoodworks , FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/cmrwoodworks1 , Proverbs 16:9

View HappyHowie's profile

HappyHowie

467 posts in 2090 days


#10 posted 02-04-2018 04:03 AM

Have you done other inlay work? What did you use for instruction? I ask because I want to learn the process myself.

-- --- Happy Howie

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

6881 posts in 3292 days


#11 posted 02-04-2018 08:01 PM

Hey Howie -

This is the first inlay work I’ve done, so I kept it as simple as possible.

What I did, was to cut 1/4” groove in the places where the inlay was to go, on the router table. I used a 1/4” straight bit, set just less than 1/8” deep. I made my inlay strips 1/4” wide, and 1/8” thick to stand just a bit proud of the sides, to fit the grooves. I cut each inlay strip to length, with 45-degree miters on both ends. It was a little cutting/fitting to get them to fit perfectly, but I got them to after a few fine-tuning cuts.

Once the inlay strips were glued in, they stood (intentionally) a hair proud of the sides. I did this to make sure that they weren’t too thin and left a depression. I then sanded them flush with a sanding block, and they were done.

There are a lot of other people here at LJ’s who do much, much better inlay work than this. Search around, and you should be able to find them.

Good luck with your inlay work—and have fun!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

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