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Dining Table

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Project by BrianGT posted 09-24-2014 11:02 PM 1725 views 3 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A dining table with a little G&G influence I have been working on. The base and bread board ends are made from cherry and the top is made up of 6 different species of hardwood; red oak, maple, white ash, red elm, black walnut and willow.
I chose to do it this way as I am in the final stages of making the chairs to go with it. The chairs also have cherry legs but each chair seat and back will be of one of the species in the top(ie. one with a maple seat and back, one with a walnut seat and back etc.) I think it will tie things together and look good.
I wanted to have the option to be able to expand the table for more guests if needed but I don’t like the seam or crack the runs across the table to drop leaves in the centre. I made leaves that attach to the ends and look more like wider breadboard ends. The supports pull out from underneath the table and have rare earth magnets in them as do the leaves. This is intended to minimize the chance that the leaf will slide out. I am really happy with the way the edge of the table turned out.
The finish is Minwax tung oil. Any thoughts on using this as a table top finish?
Please give me your thoughts on what you like AND don’t like.
Thanks

-- "Fear of failure limits our creativity" so to create something truly awesome you first have to be prepared to flop





14 comments so far

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5056 posts in 2613 days


#1 posted 09-25-2014 12:05 AM

I love trestle tables, and yours turned out great! I’m looking forward to seeing it with all the different chairs!

As far as the finish on the top goes, I’m not sure if the Minwax tung oil is just a Danish oil variant. If it is, I’d recommend an oil-based polyurethane over the top of it, after it fully cures. I used it on my dining table, and it’s held up beautifully. It looks great, and is resistant to scratching, heat, spills, and just about everything else! It cleans off with just a damp cloth, so it’s low maintenance.

If the Minwax is already polyurethane, then you’re all set.

-- Dean

View smitty22's profile

smitty22

695 posts in 2412 days


#2 posted 09-25-2014 12:54 AM

Wow! Great eye for detail, love the leaves. Just a spectacular job!!
Dale

-- Smitty

View oldsmoothy's profile

oldsmoothy

31 posts in 2121 days


#3 posted 09-25-2014 12:58 AM

Love it. Detail, Detail, Detail.

-- OS, Burleson, TX

View hoss12992's profile

hoss12992

3832 posts in 1358 days


#4 posted 09-25-2014 02:42 AM

Love it. Great job

-- The Old Rednek Workshop https://www.facebook.com/theoldrednekworkshoptn

View drewpy's profile

drewpy

568 posts in 822 days


#5 posted 09-25-2014 04:55 PM

Looks fantastic. Love the style and craftsmanship. Thanks for sharing.

-- Drew in Ohio -- "The greatest wealth is health".

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

4535 posts in 1978 days


#6 posted 09-26-2014 11:41 AM

Nice looking table.

Brian, did you use lap joints on this project? The reason I ask is that I am about to take on my very first coffee table (live edge Mesquite) and will be joining two pieces together, I’ve always used biscuits in the past but just watched a video on lap joints via the table saw and was wondering which method is the best, I might ask this question in the forums too.

Thanks

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View BJODay's profile

BJODay

514 posts in 1408 days


#7 posted 09-28-2014 11:38 PM

Where do you store the leaves?

BJ

View BrianGT's profile

BrianGT

38 posts in 1695 days


#8 posted 09-29-2014 12:26 PM

Thanks everyone for the kind words.
Blackie, if you are refering to the joints between the different species that make up the top then they are simply edge to edge glue joints. If you use a good quality glue like titebond then that is all you need to do. The joint will (or should if done correctly) be stronger than the wood being joined.
BJ, the leaves are going to be stored in a side board that I have yet to make. I was thinking of making one flip down door that resembles two or three drawer fronts at the top of the side board to store them in. Still playing with the design.

-- "Fear of failure limits our creativity" so to create something truly awesome you first have to be prepared to flop

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

4535 posts in 1978 days


#9 posted 09-29-2014 12:33 PM

Oh OK Thanks Brian, that makes it all even better and simple.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View Gerry's profile

Gerry

43 posts in 797 days


#10 posted 10-06-2014 12:02 AM

Nice Table, I like the curved edges, gives it extra character.

If you don’t mind me asking what kind of joinery did you use for the breadboards? Looks like a key on the edge, is that all the way across?

-- Gerry-Abbotsford BC

View BrianGT's profile

BrianGT

38 posts in 1695 days


#11 posted 10-10-2014 10:59 PM

ozzman115, The bread board ends are attached with matching dadoes and a floating tenon that is glued to the table the full width and glued on the bread board only about 4-5 inches in the center. There are #10×4 inch screws on the end into the table top. The floating tenons are only between these screws. hope this helps. let me know if i can clarify anything for you.

-- "Fear of failure limits our creativity" so to create something truly awesome you first have to be prepared to flop

View Gerry's profile

Gerry

43 posts in 797 days


#12 posted 11-09-2014 05:16 PM

Brian, Thanks for your response, so if I understand correctly it is a rigid joint? If it is screwed into the table from the breadboard end between the floating tenon? Does that work for taking into account expansion? In the middle of build right now that requires breadboard ends and have never attempted them before. Thanks

-- Gerry-Abbotsford BC

View BrianGT's profile

BrianGT

38 posts in 1695 days


#13 posted 11-10-2014 07:34 PM

ozzman115, I’m not exactly sure what you mean by “rigid joint” as this is rock solid but can slide to allow for wood movement. By glueing the floating tenons all the way along the center portion of the top it acts as a tongue and groove joint. Then by only glueing the center part of the newly created “tongue” to the bread board end allows the rest of the top on each side to expand and contract. I used a slot cutter to cut the grooves on the top and BB end that had cutters that are 9/16 long. So the tenon is 1 and 1/8 inch and in the space where the screws are there is more than enough room to allow the screw to flex as the top expands/contracts. Because the center is glued, you only deal with the movement for each half of the top which is only about +/- 1/8 and that means that the screw closest to the edge only flexes a little more than 1/16 each way. I don’t mind helping you out, so if you want me to explain anything else let me know.

-- "Fear of failure limits our creativity" so to create something truly awesome you first have to be prepared to flop

View Gerry's profile

Gerry

43 posts in 797 days


#14 posted 11-15-2014 07:07 AM

Brian, Thanks for your help. i think I understand it correctly. it sounds more complicated than it actually is. (hopefully I will still feel that way in a week)lol. I am going to use a plunge router with an upspiral bit and put five floating tenons into each end, and glue the center one peg the outsides with elongated holes. Thanks again for your help with this.

-- Gerry-Abbotsford BC

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