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Table Saw Sled * accurate on 3rd attempt*

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Project by jaxx posted 10-18-2008 10:34 PM 3636 views 3 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

At last i have my accurate table saw sled, this is the 3rd attempt first 2 were disasterous to say the least. I was able to get it very accurate this time by taking my time and screwing down one end of the rear fence and using wedges to get it very square then i used the 5 cut metheod to check for square . once i had it square i screwed down the rear stiffener block to give it more strenth. A little silicon oli spray in the runners and it was gliding like it was on bearings. all made from workshop scrap hardwood, rear fence is a single cut of oak and the front fence i lmainated 6 strips of Teak, i could not bring myself to cut up a 8in x 2in x 7ft slab of oak for the front fence so i used the Teak strips. finished with Tung Oil Job Done. Note i have not cut through the front fence yet as its big and dont need to just yet.





10 comments so far

View SCOTSMAN's profile (online now)

SCOTSMAN

5423 posts in 2273 days


#1 posted 10-18-2008 11:02 PM

big sled for such a small saw hope it works out fine for you.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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jaxx

53 posts in 2205 days


#2 posted 10-18-2008 11:22 PM

Thanks, Help me out here, is there any good size i should work to as i dont know what would be best size.
any tip would be great

cheers,

Ex Dundonian

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SCOTSMAN

5423 posts in 2273 days


#3 posted 10-18-2008 11:27 PM

Jaxx good scotsman that you are sorry I shouldn’t have been so negative but in reality we don’t have sleds here in the uk the preferrence is for sliding tables but as long as your sled works why worry it just looks a bit large to me but what di I know wait for some better advice.Alistair

-- excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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jaxx

53 posts in 2205 days


#4 posted 10-18-2008 11:51 PM

No worries, this is the sliding table i want but can’t find a supplier here http://www.jessem.com/mast_r_slide.htm

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Jimmy808

20 posts in 2291 days


#5 posted 10-19-2008 03:21 AM

That is a nice table saw sled. I will attempt making my own. What is the “5 cut metheod to check for square”. do you have a web link for this? do you make these from plans?

-- Jimmy

View sIKE's profile

sIKE

1271 posts in 2442 days


#6 posted 10-19-2008 03:27 AM

Nice looking sled. Is that laminate or phenolic plywood?

5-Cut Method

-- //FC - Round Rock, TX - "Experience is what you get just after you need it"

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Karson

34891 posts in 3088 days


#7 posted 10-19-2008 04:48 AM

Somehow there is a problem on the solution to the 5-Cut method that you linked to. Both the solutions for < 90 Deg and > 90 degrees are the same. I don’t believe that is true.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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Karson

34891 posts in 3088 days


#8 posted 10-19-2008 05:08 AM

What I do is a lot simpler. I’ve done the 5 cut method but mine is easier.

I take a piece of wood, preferable mdf because it cuts clean. Maybe 2’ square or so (Longer is better) but I like to have a at least 1’ cut on the board.

Do a trim crosscut on the end, keeping the board flat against your bottom fence. Call that lower side of the board A-top. I then cut about a 5” piece off the end. I take the cut-off and turn it over so that the A-top is on the bottom still against the fence (you flip it left to right, not top to bottom). Slide the two boards together, keeping the bottom flat against your bottom fence. If there is a gap at the bottom, your cut is greater than 90 deg. If there is a gap at the top, your cut is less than 90 deg. If no gap then you are right on.

Adjust your fence accordingly.

The amount of the gap is double your angle difference. You can start off with smaller pieces until you get very close then the wider the board the greater the magnification of the difference.

You could also do this with a 2” cutoff to save wood. Just make sure that the bottom edge is tight against the bottom fence in all cutting and alignment checks.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

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jaxx

53 posts in 2205 days


#9 posted 10-19-2008 10:02 AM

sled is made from 26mm double laminate,

this is great stuff, it seems that getting these sleds accurate is the hot issue when building. Great info on the squaring , i will keep these as i have to do this any time i use my sliding miter saw as the stops are not accurate.

cheers

george

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile (online now)

Lee A. Jesberger

6664 posts in 2667 days


#10 posted 10-19-2008 06:39 PM

Hi Jaxx;

The elusive perfect square! It seems everyone has a tough time with that at some point in their woodworking.

Karson’s method is quite easy to use.

A word of caution: Using any silicon in a wood shop will create disaster when it comes to finishing your projects.

The silicon causes fish eye and can wreak havok for a long time.

Nice sled though.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

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