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Boat Rack

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Project by Manitario posted 09-03-2014 06:37 PM 1618 views 8 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Last July my wife forwarded me a link for plans for a wooden boat rack. I wasn’t too keen on building it; it’s a big project, a lot of individual pieces and a lot of finishing. Eventually we made a deal; I’d do the woodworking and assembly and she’d do all the finishing. It took me about a week to get most of the parts cut and sanded, took her about a year to get the finishing done. To be fair, we needed to wait until spring to stain the 16ft boards outside as I didn’t want them taking up room in my shop. Eventually with some encouragement she got her part done and I set to assembling the boat rack. Overall I’m pleased with how it turned out. Due to the amount of snow we receive and the winter winds, we’re going to remove the roof boards every fall, which will suck, but it’ll hopefully preserve the structure. The wood is cedar; I’m not convinced that it will hold up long term under the rigors of our weather on lake Superior, however it was the only wood I could get in 16ft lengths and the easiest to work with. Maple would have been the best choice if available, but I can’t imagine assembling a structure like this out of rock maple would be “fun”.
Finished with Sikkens Cetol Marine.

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil





13 comments so far

View ChrisK's profile

ChrisK

1809 posts in 2548 days


#1 posted 09-03-2014 06:46 PM

Looks great, I think the cedar will hold pretty well.

-- Chris K

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2402 posts in 2349 days


#2 posted 09-03-2014 06:49 PM

Thanks Chris, I hope so!

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View hoss12992's profile

hoss12992

3832 posts in 1359 days


#3 posted 09-03-2014 08:44 PM

Great job

-- The Old Rednek Workshop https://www.facebook.com/theoldrednekworkshoptn

View rodman40's profile

rodman40

166 posts in 1793 days


#4 posted 09-03-2014 10:35 PM

Cool project, may make one for my John boat, thanks.

-- Rodman

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3964 posts in 2631 days


#5 posted 09-04-2014 02:25 AM

Don’t need one of those anymore, although there was a time. Canoed many hundreds of miles in the Quetico-Superior country when I was young…............

Functional, and good looking….........think that is where it is at….....

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View johnhutchinson's profile

johnhutchinson

1196 posts in 1095 days


#6 posted 09-04-2014 02:25 AM

I think it looks GREAT; not that my opinion matters.

Did I get the semicolon right? ;-)

But how is it that removing the roof will extend the life of the structure ??? Sounds counterintuitive.

Points for big word?

-- John - Central Ohio - "too much is never enough"

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2402 posts in 2349 days


#7 posted 09-04-2014 02:45 AM

Thanks guys!
Jim: I was happy keeping the canoe under the deck…a lot less work.
John: The weight of the snow in the winter would easily destroy the roof. Bonus points for the multisyllabic word!

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5730 posts in 2834 days


#8 posted 09-04-2014 05:45 AM

Really nice rack … canoe rack to be politically correct!

That is just what my brother need for his Kayaks.
Right now he has them suspended from the garage ceiling and I never fail to find out where they are when I visit him!

I am going to send him a link to this project!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3964 posts in 2631 days


#9 posted 09-04-2014 01:38 PM

I think most of the time mine sat outside under a tarp, and that was fine as well. If you have a wood canoe, it needs more protection, but fiberglass and aluminum can handle the abuse. I had a fiberglass one for many years.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2402 posts in 2349 days


#10 posted 09-04-2014 02:55 PM

yeah Jim, the aluminum canoes were pretty much indestructible, ridiculously heavy but you could drag them up a beach, across rocks, throw your pack into them and they’d still float. The canoe we have now is a kevlar blend, it is crazy lightweight but I’m afraid to break it…

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Jeff_in_LSMO's profile

Jeff_in_LSMO

341 posts in 1806 days


#11 posted 09-04-2014 04:55 PM

made me chuckle

View Dabcan's profile

Dabcan

252 posts in 2137 days


#12 posted 09-04-2014 06:23 PM

How do you like your Souris River canoe? I’ve been pining for one for a long time, one day I’ll have enough pennies to buy one…

-- @craftcollectif , http://www.craftcollective.ca, https://www.etsy.com/shop/craftcollective?

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3964 posts in 2631 days


#13 posted 09-05-2014 02:34 PM

I have not used the newer composite canoes. My fiberglass canoe was slightly heavier than a comparable aluminum, especially the light weight models meant for portaging frequently. But it was only a few pounds different, and it paddled better. It was tough, and repairable as well.

When I was young I would put a 40 pound pack on my back. Flip the canoe on, and kind of half trot across most portages. The trot bounced the canoe slightly and relieved the excruciating pain to the shoulders. I think portaging was as much about pain tolerance as it was about strength and endurance…..........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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