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Environment friendly two pin plugs

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Project by sharad posted 10-10-2008 12:40 PM 2134 views 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

When my father-in-law’s house, more than 100 years old was demolished for reconstruction I ransacked some old articles which were valuable to me but trash for others. Among them I found a wooden two pin electric plug which I was amazed to see how it was done. This was obviously before the moulded plastic plugs captured the market. My guess is that it must have been made in England. Just a month back I saw it in my preserved articles and thought why not try to make one. This small project is the outcome of that thought. The plugs were made entirely by hand tools and from pieces of wood left from other work. The pins were from broken plastic plugs and the screws were also recovered from scrap. Thus the plug has cost me nothing except my labour and I am happy about it. The main tools were the points files and the Magic Saw from Korea which I had purchased during my trip to Kualalumpur last April. It is a very versatile tool and you can log in to www.magicsaw.com for details. You can see a very good video clip ‘Multi-purpose Magic Saw’ from Metacafe.com The finishing was done with polyurethan/Walnut/ oak yellow. I am not sure if Liseed oil finish would have been better. Please advise. Although the closeup pictures look a little rough actually the plugs look very fine and smooth. Please make critical comments for further improvement.
Sharad

-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein





17 comments so far

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3051 days


#1 posted 10-10-2008 01:15 PM

Very nice Sharad, & really unique.

I’ve never seen that type of plug before. Was that used for electrical appliances?

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View darryl's profile

darryl

1795 posts in 3078 days


#2 posted 10-10-2008 01:20 PM

that’s an interesting little project.
Are you going to try and put them to work or are they just for show?

View sharad's profile

sharad

1066 posts in 2556 days


#3 posted 10-10-2008 01:28 PM

Dick, & Barb Cain, darryl thanks for your comments. The plugs can offcourse be used as any other plug and I am going to replace two of my plugs with these. They can be used for any appliances drawing less than 5 Amps. For show I will make a couple of them more.
Sharad

-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View puzzled's profile

puzzled

72 posts in 2544 days


#4 posted 10-10-2008 02:08 PM

Those are very unique, I’ve never seen wood plugs before. Let us know how well they work. Thanks for posting!!

-- -- Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of a woodturner.

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5119 posts in 2465 days


#5 posted 10-10-2008 02:11 PM

Hmmm, I suspect these, while very good looking, are not too safe to use. Might there be fire/insurance related issues in using wooden coverings for the plugs? I know 5 amps is not a lot of current but I would be a bit leary of using these. They are very nicely done though, I can’t decide if I like the grain running perpendicular to the pins or parallel with the pins.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View John Stegall's profile

John Stegall

421 posts in 2268 days


#6 posted 10-10-2008 02:18 PM

Thoise look like the 220v plugs in Europe. I assume Pune also uses the same electrical system. If true, that 5 amps would be cut in half. I will have to ask my SIL if they used those when he grew up. I know that his grandparents house is over 200 years old. I have been there but did not pay any attention to the plugs other than notice they were just like these. He uses a converter for the appliances they brought here.

Nice job with the hand tools.

-- jstegall

View Dominic Vanacora's profile

Dominic Vanacora

508 posts in 2621 days


#7 posted 10-10-2008 05:09 PM

Ok this is from the heart, please, please do not use these plugs. If you have a fire your insurance company will not I repeat will not cover your lost. Wood will as we all know absorbes water. And will short out. If you don’t beleive this the insurance company will and thats what counts. The higher the voltage (220) the more likely this will happen. Once the arc is formed there a carbon path for the short. Plastic will not absorb water and it cheap. The main reason for plastic is that it will not absorb water not that its cheap.
Just put these on a shelf and look at them….

-- Dominic, Trinity, Florida...Lets be safe out there.

View sharad's profile

sharad

1066 posts in 2556 days


#8 posted 10-10-2008 07:17 PM

Thank you Mark and Dominic very much for your comments and caution in using them. I do understand that wood absorbs water and cannot be used outdoors. I thought inside the house if it is used for appliances that do not draw heavy current it should be OK. Still I will take your advice and not use it but keep it for display.
John please let me know if they were used earlier and whether they were declared unsafe.
Sharad

-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View sharad's profile

sharad

1066 posts in 2556 days


#9 posted 10-10-2008 07:23 PM

Mark, you are really smart. The first plug- oak yellow- was accidently made with the grains parallel to pins. I realised the mistake and made the second plug with grains perpendicular to the pins and I feel that is how it should be. Thanks for your observation.
Sharad

-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View Zuki's profile

Zuki

1404 posts in 2829 days


#10 posted 10-11-2008 12:50 AM

Neat project Sharad.

-- BLOG - http://www.colorfulcanary.com/search/label/Zuki

View FJPetruso's profile

FJPetruso

304 posts in 2462 days


#11 posted 10-11-2008 06:39 AM

This is a very nice idea to add to furniture with lighting. It would make a beautiful addition to a fine wooden electric lamp project. Kind of like the finial on the top of a lamp shade

-- Frank, Florissant, Missouri "The New Show-Me Woodshop"

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2574 days


#12 posted 10-11-2008 01:28 PM

Sharad, what a novel idea!!! To have created these using only hand tools is a wonderful display of your craftsmanship.

Nice project!!

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View sharad's profile

sharad

1066 posts in 2556 days


#13 posted 10-11-2008 07:41 PM

Here is one more picture showing the Magic Saw and Points files which I used in the project

http://i437.photobucket.com/albums/qq99/Sharad_011/6.jpg

-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View clieb91's profile

clieb91

3314 posts in 2687 days


#14 posted 10-13-2008 02:39 AM

Sharad, Very nice project. As a history buff I would be very intersted to know if these type were used at some point.
Very cool that you were able to do them entirely by hand.

CtL

-- Chris L. "Don't Dream it, Be it."- PortablePastimes.com (Purveyors of Portable Fun and Fidgets)

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

153 posts in 2019 days


#15 posted 01-25-2010 10:35 AM

Beautiful project on a small scale, which can be tricky. I also like the grain better going the same direction as the pins.

One suggestion for improvement would be to somehow integrate another metal clamp that holds down the cable right after it enters the plug. It might be difficult to get it there though… but my concern would be that if you accidentally pull on the cable too hard, you might pull out the wire with the copper exposed. Having a second clamp-down kind of thing would make it safer in that aspect (most plastic plugs do have this).

Just my 2 cents. I have to check out that magic saw now, I could need one :)

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