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Table Saw Ripping Jig

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Project by MT_Stringer posted 20 days ago 1602 views 22 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Whenever I buy rough lumber, one of the first things I do is rip a straight edge. I usually buy 4/4 rough 1×6 or 1×8 in length’s up to 16 feet. The lumber yard will cut them down to a length I can carry in my truck.

So, with boards under 6 feet long, I rip a straight edge first before taking them to the jointer or planer.

I have been using a temporary jig until today.

Take a look at the pics. The jig is a plywood sled with a stop at the rear. On top of it, I ripped a couple of 1 1/8 inch wide pieces of 3/8 inch Baltic birch and sandwiched some T track in between. I glued and stapled the two pieces and screwed the T track to the sled.

I cut a couple of blocks and attached a small clamp to each one. Then I attached a toggle clamp which holds the rough stock in place. This system works well. I have ripped quiet a bit of maple and poplar with out problems popping up.

Note: There isn’t a runner for the miter slot. The sled rides against the fence. Thus, it can be adjusted to the width of the board being ripped.

The good part about this sled is the toggle clamps can be positioned to secure just about any length that needs to be cut from short to 6 feet plus.

This is simple to make. If you wish, you could modify it to make a taper cutting jig. I really don’t need to do any of that at the moment, but ripping I do need to do. I still have more cabinets to build (face frames, doors and drawer fronts).

Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas





8 comments so far

View wfedwar's profile

wfedwar

35 posts in 683 days


#1 posted 19 days ago

I like this. This will be one of my next projects. Thanks for sharing.

View hotncold's profile

hotncold

277 posts in 147 days


#2 posted 19 days ago

Been wanting to make one of these for awhile. Thanks for the inspiration!

-- Dennie - Tennessee - Every Pro was once an Amateur. Every Expert was once a Beginner. So dream Big and start Now!

View MrNorwood's profile

MrNorwood

134 posts in 315 days


#3 posted 19 days ago

another great job

-- Remember, Jesus was a carpenter.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1805 posts in 1834 days


#4 posted 19 days ago

Just a FYI…
One of my recent purchases was a ten foot 1×6 4/4 poplar. It was part of a number of boards I bought to build some cabinets with.

It was bowed considerably. I laid out the rough lengths I would need (32 inches, several at 24 inches, etc), then cross cut the board at those widths. Next I ran each one on the table saw (using this sled) to get a straight edge. With the shorter lengths, the bow wasn’t as pronounced so I was able to trim off less and save a little material.

Some of the final rips were 2 1/4 inches wide and some were 1 1/2 wide so saving a little material on the board enabled me to get several of the 1 1/2 inchers, instead of that part of the board being waste.
My sled is only 7 inches wide because, well because that is what I had available when it came time to make a sled. :-)

Hope this helps.
Mike

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

View David Dean's profile

David Dean

489 posts in 1502 days


#5 posted 19 days ago

nice work .

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

1268 posts in 1750 days


#6 posted 19 days ago

Looks like a very useful sled—I’m sure you’ll get lots of good use out of it!

-- Dean

View TheWoodenOyster's profile

TheWoodenOyster

635 posts in 538 days


#7 posted 19 days ago

Cool. I typically pop a chalk line and do my best to cut it straight on the bandsaw. Looks like this would definitely be a more precise option. Do you use your ripped edge as a “straight” edge, or do you still do a pass or two on the jointer?

-- The Wood Is Your Oyster

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1805 posts in 1834 days


#8 posted 19 days ago



Cool. I typically pop a chalk line and do my best to cut it straight on the bandsaw. Looks like this would definitely be a more precise option. Do you use your ripped edge as a “straight” edge, or do you still do a pass or two on the jointer?

- TheWoodenOyster

After I flatten one side, I run the newly cut edge across the jointer.

Ripping a straight edge with this jig is a pretty fast operation.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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