LumberJocks

New deck

  • Advertise with us
Project by Mork posted 05-10-2014 08:39 PM 1465 views 2 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Well I can finally say this deck is finished. I’m most proud of the stairs and the outboard grill idea. Most the deck was design in Sketchup which made it easy to visualize before the build. Without the sketchup the stairs would have been much more difficult. I laid out all my measurements on the two stair risers, routed the dados for the stair treads and put the risers in place. To my surprise, no mistakes! Perfect fit and treads were perfectly level. I’ll have to admit, it was a relief when it all worked perfect. Stiffeners were installed under the treads so i would not need a 3rd riser. I ended up putting a support under the stairs midway up the 14 foot riser but honestly it was amazingly solid.





14 comments so far

View David's profile

David

176 posts in 2401 days


#1 posted 05-10-2014 09:05 PM

VERY nice ! You spent a lot of time on the scroll cuts and its a nice design. I hope everyone at your abode appreciates all of your hard work. I. Think you shoul fire up that B B Q and have all the Lumberjocks over to christen it. I,ll bring my brew tote.

-- Islandwoodworker@Gmail.com

View Hawaiilad's profile

Hawaiilad

2060 posts in 1706 days


#2 posted 05-10-2014 09:10 PM

You may have worked allot on that deck, and it shows, but I’m sure you will enjoy it years to come…great build

-- Larry in sunny and warm Hawaii,

View Mork's profile

Mork

158 posts in 1460 days


#3 posted 05-10-2014 11:36 PM

A lumberjock party! What a great idea! Anyone near Glasgow Kentucky?

View Mork's profile

Mork

158 posts in 1460 days


#4 posted 05-10-2014 11:50 PM

Honestly the hardest part was lifting the 20 foot 2×10s and getting the 14 foot floor joists up. It doesnt show in the pictures but I pre-notched everything so toe nailing was a breeze. One unforeseen pain in the neck was that all the 2×10s were different widths. They varied almost 1/2”! So I had to add shims to make the floor level. I think the open floor joists with the contoured ends adds a lot to the looks and cutting them with a jig saw saw really easy.

One more thing… the doubled 2×10s were as much for design as they were strength. It provided a firm support for the railing posts which are attached with 2 carriage bolts.

View shopdog's profile

shopdog

562 posts in 2171 days


#5 posted 05-12-2014 01:16 AM

Mork,

That’s a great looking deck…impeccably built. Nice plan too (I love Sketchup).
I’m a long time deck builder, and doubt I would have done it better.
If you lived in Brooklyn, I’d be happy to have you work with me.

-- Steve-- http://www.urbanexteriors.biz

View bbrewer's profile

bbrewer

43 posts in 661 days


#6 posted 05-12-2014 01:33 AM

I think the double cantilevered sections around the stairs really make the project. The double joist are a good idea, I’ve done that on decks for posts, but also so that deck board ends break on the open space. Very nice deck.

-- Tom southern MI

View Mork's profile

Mork

158 posts in 1460 days


#7 posted 05-12-2014 03:35 AM

Thanks for the compliments.

Steve, very cool web site! Did you also build the deck furniture? Looks like pricey wood you are working with. I’m afraid mine is treated yellow pine.

Tom, I agree, both the cantilever and the doubled joists really add to the design. Also the cost of the double floor joists is not as much as you might think. I think all total the difference between doubled and single was less that $100.

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7793 posts in 2738 days


#8 posted 05-12-2014 05:23 AM

COOL deck and stairway!

Very nice…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View shopdog's profile

shopdog

562 posts in 2171 days


#9 posted 05-12-2014 11:04 AM

Mork,

That wood is Ipe. Clients around here want a more high end deck…at least my clients do.
I’ve built some benches, but not the deck furniture.

-- Steve-- http://www.urbanexteriors.biz

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15959 posts in 1552 days


#10 posted 05-12-2014 01:40 PM

Very nice work. It looks great and adds a lot to the house.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Mork's profile

Mork

158 posts in 1460 days


#11 posted 05-12-2014 09:29 PM

I’m sure the Ipe holds up very well. Treated yellow pine does ok but you have to maintain it. Is Ipe easy to work with?

Thanks Charles!

View shopdog's profile

shopdog

562 posts in 2171 days


#12 posted 05-12-2014 10:16 PM

Charles,

Ipe does very well over time, but it needs to be maintained…Bare sun will turn it silver, with some minor checking.
If there are trees over head, dropping tree trash, then the gaps between boards will close up over time, just like any other wooden deck. Only with Ipe, you can clean it with a pressure washer 10 years later…and restore it.
Is it easy to work with? There are more steps to installing it, but after 15 years of doing it, it’s basic deck installation. I have a good old Makita slider, with a Forrest Chopmaster blade…and I use a couple of board bosses that can tame unruly Ipe boards.
It’s not dovetail joinery.

-- Steve-- http://www.urbanexteriors.biz

View Mork's profile

Mork

158 posts in 1460 days


#13 posted 05-13-2014 01:24 AM

The one regret I have is that I didn’t leave enough gap between the boards. I don’t think anyone is going to wear high heels on my deck and the helicopter seeds from my maple tree get stuff between the boards.

I’ll bet the Ipe is dry and fairly true to size. The 2×10s I had varies at least 3/8” in width and the deck boards at least an 1/8” What kind of wood do you use for the structural supports?

View shopdog's profile

shopdog

562 posts in 2171 days


#14 posted 05-13-2014 05:26 PM

It’s treated pine…it’s gonna shrink, and the gaps will get bigger. If you don’t clean it periodically, then the opposite will happen. Water can pool on your deck, and then the boards will swell, and the gaps can disappear.

Ipe shrinks too…it’s not dry at all…nor is it true to size. 1×6 is anywhere between 5 3/8- to 5 1/2+. It’s milled in the jungle. I don’t use Ipe as a substructure…I use treated pine too, so I know what you’re saying. I need to shim and notch. Ipe would be too difficult to use for a substructure…and too expensive

-- Steve-- http://www.urbanexteriors.biz

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase