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Homemade Dust Collection Ports

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Project by bigfoot11 posted 05-05-2014 01:46 AM 2108 views 8 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

When I first made some of these, I didn’t realize how useful they would become. Using scrap pieces of plywood, I was able to make ports for all of my tools and didn’t spend a single penny. The adapters sold at the BORG usually doesn’t fit the greatest so why waste time shimming up with tape when you can make your own for a perfect fit?

Sure they’re easy enough to figure out but after a bit of trial and error, I have it down to a science and want to pass the knowledge on.

A ton more photos over at my website: http://www.jeff-ferguson.com/2014/05/04/homemade-dust-collection-ports/

And a quick video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3IdB3TFOSDU





12 comments so far

View hotbyte's profile

hotbyte

185 posts in 1627 days


#1 posted 05-05-2014 02:38 AM

Interesting idea…the taped up/rigged adapter on my old Ryobi miter saw came loose just today. This looks like a better idea than more duct tape :) Thanks!

View XrayJay's profile

XrayJay

90 posts in 630 days


#2 posted 05-05-2014 11:18 AM

Perfect timing. I am having trouble with my bandsaw port. Great video Bigfoot/Jeff. Thanks!

-- Whatever you find to do with your hands, do it with all your might,... because there is no work in the grave...Ecclesiastes 9:10

View bigfoot11's profile

bigfoot11

38 posts in 334 days


#3 posted 05-05-2014 01:30 PM

Something to keep in mind if there isn’t gravity forcing the dust/shavings down and into the vac hose, then you will end up with some accumulation when using a smaller vac that you’ll want to clean out periodically.

On the other hand, my table saw has the dust port in the bottom so it drops down about 12” and then a 90 degree turn and into my adapter, no build up at all.

There’s not many things more satisfying than watching that stuff swirl around my cyclone instead of getting piled up on the floor!!

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2385 posts in 2089 days


#4 posted 05-05-2014 03:04 PM

I’ve got some of these too. They work well. I use an adjustable hole cutter. you’ve got to keep your hands away from it but it does work well.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View bigfoot11's profile

bigfoot11

38 posts in 334 days


#5 posted 05-05-2014 03:07 PM

I pondered using one of those or a forstner bit but in the end roughing it out with either drill bits or a jig saw seems to work best then just finish it up with the drum sander to get a perfect fit.

I like to make the tool connection super tight and the vac hose more loose so the adapter stays on the tool without tape or fastener.

View Hawaiilad's profile

Hawaiilad

1989 posts in 1672 days


#6 posted 05-05-2014 09:15 PM

Another great idea. Most of my large tools use a 4” connection, but there are those tools that never seem to match up to anything. Thanks for sharing your great idea

-- Larry in sunny and warm Hawaii,

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10850 posts in 1341 days


#7 posted 05-05-2014 11:59 PM

All of my DC adapters are made of wood in a similar fashion but I cut the inside and outside circles with the bandsaw leaving the ‘access kerf’ open. I sand a slight taper on the outside and the kerf closes tightly around the hose when the adapter is shoved into the tool opening. Hope this makes sense.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View bigfoot11's profile

bigfoot11

38 posts in 334 days


#8 posted 05-06-2014 12:04 AM

@gfadvm
It sounds like you’re practically making your port adapters like a bandsaw box?

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10850 posts in 1341 days


#9 posted 05-06-2014 12:22 AM

Yes, that’s a good description. You could glue the kerf closed like I do with my bandsaw boxes but it really works best to leave the kerf open for a little adjustment to fit. I cut the inside a little tight and then use the spindle sander to tweak the fit.

Not tryin to hijack your thread but I had trouble finding holesaw/Forstner bits that were exactly the right size so went with the bandsaw.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View bigfoot11's profile

bigfoot11

38 posts in 334 days


#10 posted 05-06-2014 12:50 AM

No worries about the hijack, this place is about sharing information!

Give the stability of plywood and adding a finish to it, there will be very little movement so I made the tool part extra tight for a good seal.

If you notice, most tool and vac connector ports are tapered so you need a good friction fit so it doesn’t fall out with vibration.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10850 posts in 1341 days


#11 posted 05-06-2014 01:42 AM

I also will often use a couple of sheet metal screws to fix it in place where it slip fits inside a tube arrangement (like stepping my bandsaw DC down from 4” to 2 1/2”)

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

1880 posts in 1882 days


#12 posted 05-06-2014 02:40 AM

Good job. Thanks for sharing.

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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