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Help-Warped cutting board

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Project by daves1 posted 05-03-2014 01:27 PM 1175 views 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Help-Warped cutting board
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I have made numerous cutting boards but this one warped on me and I can’t figure out why. It is made with walnut and hard maple. Any help incite be appreciated.





13 comments so far

View harveysoriginals's profile

harveysoriginals

101 posts in 175 days


#1 posted 05-03-2014 01:35 PM

I think I know your answer will be no but I will be stupid and ask the question anyway!
Did it get wet?
BTW! I love the board!

-- The most dangerous tool in my shop is the one I am currently using! Harvey

View daves1's profile

daves1

151 posts in 1454 days


#2 posted 05-03-2014 01:36 PM

Harvey, no

View harveysoriginals's profile

harveysoriginals

101 posts in 175 days


#3 posted 05-03-2014 01:45 PM

I make and sell quite a few end grain boards and tell customers water is the enemy! LOL! Hope you weren’t offended? The only thing though that otherwise cones to mind is the squareness of the ts? Or, perhaps one wood had a significantly higher moisture content?

-- The most dangerous tool in my shop is the one I am currently using! Harvey

View daves1's profile

daves1

151 posts in 1454 days


#4 posted 05-03-2014 01:47 PM

Harvey, I certainly was not offended. I appreciate your input.

View harveysoriginals's profile

harveysoriginals

101 posts in 175 days


#5 posted 05-03-2014 01:58 PM

Hopefully you can lay it out on a flat surface and have it return close to flat! Sanding those things is a pain IMO!!!!

-- The most dangerous tool in my shop is the one I am currently using! Harvey

View Wdwerker's profile

Wdwerker

333 posts in 921 days


#6 posted 05-03-2014 03:32 PM

Let it dry and equalize the moisture content between the woods. Then flatten with a drum sander or router jig. Working with a piece that has recently been glued up can still have an elevated moisture content even though the glue joints are dry enough to machine.
Clamping cauls will give you a better alignment across the strips but they can trap glue and moisture underneath them as well.

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

View GeBeWubya's profile

GeBeWubya

47 posts in 724 days


#7 posted 05-03-2014 03:49 PM

In the software world, the mantra is “It’s not a bug; it’s a feature!”

“The non-planar design allows liquids to drain predictably off the cutting board and out of the cook’s way.”

-- (- |: \,/

View SASmith               's profile

SASmith

1607 posts in 1675 days


#8 posted 05-03-2014 05:32 PM

I have seen cuttingboards cup because of uneven mineral oil application. Like putting 5 coats on one side and 2 on the other. They usually even out, if not it may be fixable by giving more coats to the cupped (concave) side.

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

View whiskygonewrong's profile

whiskygonewrong

49 posts in 368 days


#9 posted 05-03-2014 07:59 PM

Try putting four small feet on it one in each corner to let the air go around it and breath a bit it seems to work with the ones I made. Cheers dunk

-- I always have wood in my shed

View daves1's profile

daves1

151 posts in 1454 days


#10 posted 05-03-2014 08:57 PM

Thanks everyone for your input.

View daves1's profile

daves1

151 posts in 1454 days


#11 posted 05-03-2014 09:00 PM

GeBeWubya, I like the way you think. Wouldn’t have to worry about liquids puddling up on the board.

View mrjinx007's profile

mrjinx007

1696 posts in 456 days


#12 posted 05-04-2014 01:19 AM

If it is cupped on all sides, then turn it opposite of the convex and see if airflow/ heat from the sun cause it to self-correct.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View JT23325's profile

JT23325

151 posts in 835 days


#13 posted 05-09-2014 02:49 PM

An educated guess is that there was a notable moisture differential between the stock used. I have experienced a similar issue in the past. To prevent this I have had to bake strips in the oven at around 120 deg for about 45 min. For me that had balanced out the moisture content in most of the stock (air dried} that I have used. I also use hot mineral oil/beeswax mix to cure the completed cutting boards. I have found that the this technique penetrates better and greatly adds to the water resistance… adding a little beeswax to the mix helps the oils from being stripped out of the boards when washing. And bless her heart has also survived a few trips through the dishwasher.(not recommended)

-- Jeff, Ability will never catch up with the demand for it. - Malcolm Forbes

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