LumberJocks

Spalted maple bowl II

  • Advertise with us
Project by RusticElements posted 09-24-2008 12:03 AM 1748 views 3 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is fun! After finishing the other bowl this morning, I thought I’d make a another one. This one’s bigger – 18” X 9.75” X 4”.

-- Michael R. Harvey - Brewster, NY - RusticElementArt.com - SpaceAware.org - AnConn.com





8 comments so far

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19455 posts in 2504 days


#1 posted 09-24-2008 01:18 AM

Michael, what tools did you use .

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View RusticElements's profile

RusticElements

167 posts in 2378 days


#2 posted 09-24-2008 03:35 AM

Well, I start by getting the general shape with a chain saw, but you probably already knew that part. Since the chain saw leaves quite a mess, I smooth the bottom on the jointer/planer. The inside is carved out with this, (definitely not a tool to be taken lightly!!) and then a coarse 1in. sphere. A 3in. sanding pad is then used from #80 to #220. Then it’s over to the band saw to rough shape the outside according to what was carved inside. That is smoothed some with something like #H on this page. A R/O sander finishes up the outside and then it’s into the kitchen to apply the hot wax.

All in all, this bowl took about 2 1/2 hours.

-- Michael R. Harvey - Brewster, NY - RusticElementArt.com - SpaceAware.org - AnConn.com

View lew's profile

lew

10029 posts in 2408 days


#3 posted 09-24-2008 04:58 AM

Really nice looking bowl. Thanks for the step by step.

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19455 posts in 2504 days


#4 posted 09-24-2008 09:15 AM

Michael, I have one of those Arbourtech shapers, did a blog on it. It’s a great tool, very quick & good control but you’re right not a tool to be taken lightly. Thanks for the detail.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View snowdog's profile

snowdog

1132 posts in 2635 days


#5 posted 09-24-2008 01:45 PM

Thanks for the step by step, that really helps a lot. Trial and error and error and error is my usually way of finding out how “it was done” :) Great work.

Do you like the 3 blade cutter better than the chainsaw type cutters I have seen for the grinder?

-- "so much to learn and so little time"..

View RusticElements's profile

RusticElements

167 posts in 2378 days


#6 posted 09-24-2008 02:17 PM

That’s usually my method of learning as well. I try different things until I find something that works. Of course, once in a while I’ll look it up or ask, but not very often.

I’ve only used the 3 blade so I can’t say. I do know I like the 3 blade.

-- Michael R. Harvey - Brewster, NY - RusticElementArt.com - SpaceAware.org - AnConn.com

View SteveRussell's profile

SteveRussell

101 posts in 2613 days


#7 posted 09-24-2008 09:39 PM

Hello Michael,

Great looking freeform bowl. Very nice figure as well. I’ve used Arbortech tools for many years and in fact, I used to demonstrate for them at larger woodworking and woodturning shows. They are an excellent tool for the work you described, as are the Kutzall burrs. If you have the smaller Arbortech (mini-grinder) there are now Kutzall wheels for that model as well, that really make freeform carving easy.

You might also look into flap wheel sanders and flutter wheel sanders (Klingspor) for refining the interior of your vessels. They work on a standard 1/4” arbor in a drill, so you won’t need special tools to use them. You can also stack them on the arbor to make a larger working surface. Down in what’s left of the Hurricane hit Houston/Galveston area, we call those “Pancake Sanders.” :-) Take care and best wishes to you and yours!

Steve Russell

-- Better Woodturning and Finishing Through Chemistry... http://www.woodturningvideosplus.com

View Joel Tille's profile

Joel Tille

213 posts in 2897 days


#8 posted 03-15-2009 03:49 PM

Michael – Nice free-form bowls and thanks for posting some of the tools you use, sometimes we don’t know whats available for wood working because we don’t know it exist.

I have some big piece from a maple tree that was hollow in the middle and needed to come down. Some of the branches and the what was left of the trunk have some good spalting. I think they would make some nice looking bowls. Need to start saving some money.

-- Joel Tille

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase