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Workshop storage for air compressor and propane tank

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Project by Cruiszr posted 04-24-2014 03:01 AM 5649 views 1 time favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Started this project last year by poring the concrete pad for my propane tank and air compressor. Had to wait for the weather to warm up enough to get back outside for a few days to construct the enclosure for the tank and compressor. The propane tank had to be located outside the building anyway so why not enclose it along with the air compressor to free up space in the workshop and also help cut down of the noise when the compressor is running.
Here are the work in progress photos from start to finish with the exception of final painting.

Photo of the concrete pad this spring with propane tank in place and new compressor ready to unbox and install after enclosurer is completed.

Framing of the additional store area for propane tank and compressor. Becasue of size of pad ending up using 12 inch on center framing.

With the window located directly above part on the structure had to work with a very low pitch roof. Plan to install an air conditioner in the window later this year so the roof will work in helping support the unit.


Completed installing the roof sheeting and tar paper.


Installation of the siding was the next task at hand.

Completed installing the roof shingles after making a run to HD for matching shingles.


Last to complete was hanging door and installing trim.

-- George R. Forest, Virginia





22 comments so far

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

138 posts in 1047 days


#1 posted 04-24-2014 04:24 AM

I really like it. I will soon design my own version and really like what you did. Mine will be the compressor, and a could of ice chests that i need a place to store.

I do have a couple of questions:
Is there a lower wall, on the side of the shed nearest the building, to fully enclose the shed? Or is it open to the back, to the area underneath area of the building?
Did you incorporate any other ventilation in your shed?

Thanks, and your work sure looks good.
jim
.

View MalcolmLaurel's profile

MalcolmLaurel

269 posts in 1085 days


#2 posted 04-24-2014 11:01 AM

Looks nice, but I see two things: Is the propane regulator far enough from the window (code says 36”, I think)? And there really should be ventilation at top and bottom both to prevent any fumes from building up and to allow cooling of the compressor.

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com

View Cruiszr's profile

Cruiszr

88 posts in 1055 days


#3 posted 04-24-2014 12:39 PM

Thanks for looking and the comments. To your concerns Malcolm, The tubing for the propane was installed by a licensed and certificated technician to make sure the propane was installed properly to local code and there would be no gas leaks. That’s not something that I feel comfortable doing as my life could depend on it being done right. As for the ventilation, the back was left open at the bottom against the workshop wall to allow air flow to enter. If you look closely you see that the space between the roof rafters was not closed in on the front of the shed. This was left open to allow bottom to top air movement and release any fumes that may have been released from the propane tank. Hope I answered your questions/concerns.

-- George R. Forest, Virginia

View GerardoArg1's profile

GerardoArg1

940 posts in 1456 days


#4 posted 04-24-2014 01:19 PM

Beatiful. Nice job. Congratulations

-- Disfruta tu trabajo (enjoy your work) (Bandera, Argentina)

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

138 posts in 1047 days


#5 posted 04-24-2014 02:02 PM

Living in a moderate/hot Houston climate, I was thinking about leaving a gap of maybe a foot or so around three sides of my little compressor shack for air to circulate. In my case, the back side will be against the outer wall of the shop, which is sitting on a poured slab, not a raised foundation. It will sit between the shop wall and a stand-alone Tuff Shed, so that the compressor house will be protected from sun exposure. I plan a roof much like yours to provide rain protection.

Thank you for sharing this. Seeing your results gives me a strong urge to get busy!

View Skylark53's profile

Skylark53

2631 posts in 2522 days


#6 posted 04-24-2014 02:03 PM

Good plan. I’ve used my compressor in a similar set up and its worked beautifully. I don’t use gas, if I did I would be a bit concerned about any electrical sparks that near the gas. I’m sure you’ve thought it all out and wish you the best with the shop.

-- Rick, Tennessee, John 3:16

View Cruiszr's profile

Cruiszr

88 posts in 1055 days


#7 posted 04-24-2014 02:41 PM

Thanks Rick for the comment.
When laying this out I did have some concerns about the two being in the same unit. That’s one of the reason for making sure it had good ventilation in the top of the unit. The propane tank and compressor are approx. 5’ apart and I shouldn’t be having gas leaks to begin with. That’s not to say it couldn’t happen. With the air flow entering the bottom and escaping from the top I hope that I have ensured that any gas that may have leaked out during changing tanks will not linger but escape out of the air ports between rafters. That was one the concerns I had was being air tight and possibly holding in the fumes. I’ve even thought about putting in a patrician wall.

-- George R. Forest, Virginia

View hotncold's profile

hotncold

762 posts in 1007 days


#8 posted 04-24-2014 03:32 PM

This looks nice but just a comment…propane is “heavier” than air and so it will displace oxygen (air) at the bottom of the structure and will not dissipate through the openings between the rafters. My concern would be a spark caused when the compressor pressure switch closes. As long as there is no leak, it’s fine.

-- Dennie - Tennessee

View Cruiszr's profile

Cruiszr

88 posts in 1055 days


#9 posted 04-24-2014 04:18 PM

Thanks for the comment, I did leave the back side open at the bottom so if the propane is heaver than air wouldn’t it escape at the bottom opening?

I do have a question about this: how is this any different than someone running a propane heater with 20 lb. tank attached and starting equipment like saws, joiners, compressors, etc. Wouldn’t that be the same thing?

-- George R. Forest, Virginia

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

5989 posts in 1791 days


#10 posted 04-24-2014 05:20 PM

Great idea …... but I have a thought for you.

Since the compressor is a fairly high current drawing machine, you can almost be assured of a small amount of arcing across the motor starting contacts.

I was under the impression that the regulators on the LPG tank could emit a small amount of gas, and I’m wondering if you may be trapping that gas in the same “container” as a spark source.

You might want to add ventilation somehow.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View OregonWoodRat's profile

OregonWoodRat

130 posts in 1749 days


#11 posted 04-24-2014 05:29 PM

Nice job. But now I have another project.

-- Peter, A man convinced against his will is of the same opinion still.

View Cruiszr's profile

Cruiszr

88 posts in 1055 days


#12 posted 04-24-2014 06:51 PM

Mainac Matt, thanks for your comment.

I thought that I had already addressed that concern. There is ventilation from both the top and bottom of the structure. The back of the lower storage area is open at the back below the workshop wall and top ventilation between the rafters at top.

-- George R. Forest, Virginia

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5604 posts in 2694 days


#13 posted 04-25-2014 12:19 AM

It looks good and I won’t pile on about the gas thing. You seem to have addressed that. What is the propane for? Just heat or do you run a generator on it too?

I see these out shacks often for compressor and dust collector. First propane I have seen.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Cruiszr's profile

Cruiszr

88 posts in 1055 days


#14 posted 04-25-2014 12:47 AM

Thanks for the comment , dbhostI
I wanted to move the air compressor outside of the workshop to gain the additional space and cut down on the noise. Including the propane tank in the storage area was an after thought in an effort clean around the workshop and make the wife happy. I guess I could have just put a fence around the propane tank to conceal it but thought the storage area would achieve the same thing.
As for a generator, the main panel electrical box is located in the front of the workshop so I plan to build an enclosure for the generator in front of the building. I have seen several designs that allowed you to roll the generator inside the enclosure for storage but can be moved out and used somewhere else if necessary. Right now the generator is stored underneath the deck on the rear of the house where it is out of the weather.

-- George R. Forest, Virginia

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5604 posts in 2694 days


#15 posted 04-25-2014 02:22 AM

Not sure how much noise that compressor you have makes, but it really isn’t that big of an issue for me. At least my 29 gallon compressor. The 8 gallon unit is a little loud, but the 29 I can be on speaker phone in the shop carrying on a conversation as it cycles…

I think the machine you got is an oil less direct drive though, at least from what I could tell from the pics. I could be wrong. Those tend to be loud… Moving it would be a REALLY good idea for sure!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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