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Drunken Cutting Boards #1: Drunken Alice in Wonderland Cutting Board

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Blog entry by poroskywood posted 1782 days ago 28907 reads 416 times favorited 40 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Drunken Cutting Boards series Part 2: Smooth Flowing Drunken Checker board »

Hey everybody, after a few personal messages here is my version of a how to on a Drunken Checker Board. I of coarse bow to the Chairman of the Board and pay tribute with beer. This is a Off-Checker pattern I call “Drunken Alice in Wonderland” The “serendipitous” nature of this piece is appealing in a far out sort of way. Here Goes…

So first I prepare the Material. I am using Hard Maple and Walnut both are surfaced flat and cut 1” x 9” x 14” You only need ONE piece of each, for two boards. (In this multi part blog I’ll be making four boards).

I’m also using 1/8” Cherry strips for the outline in between the blocks. I rip some 3/16” x 1” x 28” long. and surface each side to 1/8” on my planer so both faces are smooth.

We will be making 5 rips and 6 cross cuts in two boards so make plenty of strips the first time so they are all uniform.

Then Double sided tape one Walnut and one Hard Maple blank together, flat and square, to run through bandsaw.
I make 5 length-wise rips with a S shape and a Opposing S shape making what I call a vase shape. Your Imagination is your only limit here and the fact that you have to clamp it back together.

I then lightly sand the cuts smooth trying not to change the shape of the cut at all.

In a orderly fashion pull pieces apart and alternating pieces lay out two matching boards.

Place Cherry strips in between each cut. Glue everything in between, and clamp till dry.

I surface our curvy blanks flat and square so we can tape them back together.
Ok, we now have two curvy blanks with strips. Half-way there.

Double sided Tape them back together. (This is where the serendipity happened for me).
Tape them together so a dark color is over a light color this will create the checkerboard part during the next series of cross cuts. For the Drunken Alice in Wonderland effect when taping the two together make sure the curves also oppose each other the stripes will not match up.

Make Six cross cuts using the same style a S cut and a opposing S cut or Vase cut like so.

Once again sand, pull apart in order, alternate pieces making two boards with a checkerboard pattern.
Add Strips, glue, and clamp. When clamping I try to line up the edges of the pieces as best I can this is important to get a good tight fit in the curves, through heavy pressure, to avoid any gaps I use my big pipe clamps

I trim, surface, sand, rout edges, and apply mineral oil.

Part two of this blog will be much the same process however I will illustrate how to produce a smooth flowing Drunken checkerboard pattern, Where the strips line up in a smooth wave.

Ok, I thank you all for the inspiration you have given me and I will challenge you all to come up with the different possibilities this basic design offers. We are only limited by our imaginations and clamping capacities.

I dedicate this post to my grandfather Theodore M Porosky who taught me the joys of woodworking, 20 years ago by making cutting boards in his work shop.

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott



40 comments so far

View blackcherry's profile (online now)

blackcherry

3148 posts in 2424 days


#1 posted 1782 days ago

Nice review I’m sure the Chairman of the Board is raising his Toucans to this Blog…Blkcherry

View huff's profile

huff

2783 posts in 1886 days


#2 posted 1782 days ago

I’ll drink to that! When I sober up I want to try one of those. Seriously, Thanks for a great blog and I really do have this on my list of things to do. Thanks for sharing.

-- John @ http://www.thehuffordfurnituregroup.com

View patron's profile

patron

12962 posts in 1942 days


#3 posted 1782 days ago

is it something like this ?

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View poroskywood's profile

poroskywood

614 posts in 1965 days


#4 posted 1782 days ago

Ok David, I think you got it. OMFG! I now have a beer for David our CEO.

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott

View patron's profile

patron

12962 posts in 1942 days


#5 posted 1782 days ago

test question :
if you do 3 boards , how many do you get ?
if you do 4 ?
or 5 ?
how about 6 ?
thats what this started as 6 boards
just count the different kinds of wood .

so how many boxes ?

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112000 posts in 2178 days


#6 posted 1782 days ago

Cool blog good Job well done

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View poroskywood's profile

poroskywood

614 posts in 1965 days


#7 posted 1782 days ago

6 boxes? (I reserve the right to edit this to the correct answer) 1 box a board?
This is pure genius or complete insanity! Great, Inspiring Idea! I see it now. I was thinking when I was making these, you could make a table or panels out of these because the boards match up you could join a bunch together for a lid to a box or a door for that matter. I feel like we are drinking beers in the woodshop together.

-- There's many a slip betwixt a cup and a lip.--Scott

View Matt Vredenburg's profile

Matt Vredenburg

127 posts in 2015 days


#8 posted 1782 days ago

Awesome Scott. Thank you for sharing!

-- Matt, Arizona

View patron's profile

patron

12962 posts in 1942 days


#9 posted 1782 days ago

the higher the stack ,
the more careful the cut .
if the blade gets to whipping , the top board ,
and the bottom board have slight irregulars in them .

your answerer is correct ,
how ever there are only 2 like this one ,
after the first cut and glue up i used the other matches for other stacked cuts

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View woodisit's profile

woodisit

61 posts in 1843 days


#10 posted 1782 days ago

Great blog, nice camera work.

-- Woodisit

View degoose's profile (online now)

degoose

6976 posts in 1956 days


#11 posted 1782 days ago

I will be trying this for myself.
I am so happy for you Scott. You have finally realised that …....!
You have taken what we have shown you and you have made it your own ….. well done…

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

View ellen35's profile

ellen35

2557 posts in 2034 days


#12 posted 1782 days ago

Scott,
This tutorial is great! It is so easy to understand and follow. I’ll be trying my hand at this soon.
Thanks for the instruction… with kudos to David and Larry!
Ellen

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2423 days


#13 posted 1782 days ago

Scott, this is a nice blog on the construction of these boards. I have been meaning to try one (of course I have to clear out some of my other “commissions” that my wife has given me) and this has been both an inspiration and a well documented tutorial. I will be following this series.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Charles Maxwell's profile

Charles Maxwell

941 posts in 2408 days


#14 posted 1781 days ago

very clever! i learned something in this post. Thanks so much for sharing.

-- Max the "night janitor" at www.hardwoodclocks.com

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11639 posts in 2289 days


#15 posted 1777 days ago

Both Curly Maple AND Curly Walnut !!! You’re my hero , Scottie : ) Thanks for simplifying this process for the weak at heart like myself : ) Your blog and photos are excellent and I am looking forward to your next post on this subject. What size blade are you using and do you draw lines to follow , or just freehand your curves ?
That’s a nice sanding drum that you have there . What’s the model # ?

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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