Filling the guts of your Dutch tool chest #4: Plane dividers lattice

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Blog entry by Brad posted 07-23-2014 09:48 PM 1986 reads 0 times favorited 2 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Lid panel saw fixtures Part 4 of Filling the guts of your Dutch tool chest series Part 5: Backsaw till »

Fixtures really make this chest an excellent storage space. And since I intend to travel with my chest, I want it to travel well. By “well” I mean that I don’t want tools to be damaged in transit. As is, the virgin top space doesn’t meet that standard.

So to ensure that things stay put during the rigors of a “Florida or Bust” road trip I created a number of fixtures.

Top-section Fixture: plane dividers lattice
One of the reasons that my fixture layout worked out so well was because I started with the ones that “fixed” the dimensions of the others. That meant installing the plane lattice dividers first to house the jointer, jack and smoother.

Now, keeping in mind that I often change up my peg-board tool storage layout, I wanted to give myself the flexibility to do that in my chest. So I chose to install free-standing lattice dividers. No glue or screws.

The divider lattice consists of five parts:

(2) runners: poplar-1/2” x 1 ½”
(2) divider slats: poplar-1/4” x 1 ½”
(1) jack/smoother divider: poplar-1/2” x 1 ½”

The lattice joinery is simple. The lateral divider slats have tabs at each end which seat in slots cut into the vertical runners.

I started by cutting the lattice side runners a bit long and then dialed in a snug fit using a shooting board. After that, I sized the slats to create the divided storage areas.

To determine the position of the jointer slat, I measured from the backside of the front, added 3/16” (to allow for the ¼’ thick fall front locks, plus 1/16” clearance from them), added the width of my woodie jointer, plus 1/16” clearance on the back side.

That gave me the inside dimensions of the jointer storage area.

I marked this on the lattice side runners and routed notches for the jointer slat. The notch depth is ½ the width of the runner and the notch width is equal to the width of the slat. With the notches cut, I sawed the jointer slat to length, tweaked it for a snug fit, and routed a “tab” onto each end to fit into the runner notches. The tab depth equals the depth of the notch and the tab length equals the thickness of the side runner.

The next area houses both the jack and the smoother. To complete the lattice for these I repeated the process. The only difference was the addition of a dado in both the jointer and jack slats to accept a ½” thick divider between the jack and smoother.

The completed lattice looks like this.

After the shellac dried, I installed the lattice and turned my attention to the backsaw till.

© 2014, Brad Chittim, all rights reserved.

-- "People's lives are their own rewards or punishments."

2 comments so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

17875 posts in 1987 days

#1 posted 07-23-2014 10:08 PM

I think the trip will go well. It certainly beats USPS!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. -

View ToddJB's profile


6773 posts in 1550 days

#2 posted 07-24-2014 01:00 PM

This sort of organizational problem solving is really enjoyable to me. I hope this process is equally as fun for you. It’s looking good.

-- I came - I sawed - I over-built

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