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Finishing Tips #2: Hide Glue Wash Mix for Cherry

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Blog entry by pjones46 posted 1095 days ago 1597 reads 1 time favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Blotch Control (Homemade) Part 2 of Finishing Tips series Part 3: Spraying Lazy Susan »

I read somewhere that a thinned Hide glue wash was at one time used as a preconditioned to cure blotching so have taken 2oz of Titebond Liquid Hide Glue and mixed it with 12 oz of water as a second test. The reason also for choosing the liquid hide was it was more transparent vs being a cloudy white when mixed with water and this I felt would dry more transparent.

Anyway, I sanded my sample board with 220 as prep, applied a liberal coat of the hide glue wash, let it set for a few minutes so that the wood could absorb it, then wiped it off with a paper towel. I let it dry overnight, sanded with ROS 220 just to knock off the raised grain, then applied a second coat of the Hide wash as done previously. Let it dry over night and hit it again with ROS 220.

The first thing I noticed was the figure/grain was really pronounced as compared to the mix I used in Finishing Tips #1. I then applied the dye stain but the color was not the same even though I used the same dye. It was a shade or so lighter but the grain really showed through, the cause I assume is that the dye didn’t penetrate the wood as much as with mix one.

Let that dry overnight and applied two coats of clear spray lacquer. And the figure/grain really shows through beautifully also very little blotching which was the main point of this whole thing. I would have to say even less blotching than with either Charles Neil’s or my original Gorilla White Wood glue mix.

I can’t get over how well the grain showed and no distortion of figure.

Anyway, my conclusion is that here is another very cheap way to cure the majority of blotching when working with cherry, but I have not tried it on any other species. I have a larger test sample that I am working on now and when that is done I will try to post some pictures.

Try it for yourself but on scrap samples to see if it suits you.

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com



15 comments so far

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1380 posts in 2630 days


#1 posted 1094 days ago

Congrats!
You have rediscovered the wisdom of the ancients.
Glue sizing has been used for centuries.

-- 温故知新

View derosa's profile

derosa

1474 posts in 1339 days


#2 posted 1094 days ago

Good info for those of us who weren’t aware, I’ll try this on my baby gate next week.

-- --Rev. Russ in NY-- A posse ad esse

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

207 posts in 1146 days


#3 posted 1094 days ago

hobomonk

Oh you artists. I may be old but not that old.

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

819 posts in 1193 days


#4 posted 1094 days ago

Glue sizing is an excellent way to seal problem areas before finishing, including the edges of mdf when being painted or endgrain to prevent stain from becoming to dark.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "finished"!

View hObOmOnk's profile

hObOmOnk

1380 posts in 2630 days


#5 posted 1094 days ago

Too… :)
Titebond Liquid Hide Glue is a good product, yet the unsung hero of modern woodwarriors.

-- 温故知新

View Steven H's profile

Steven H

1108 posts in 1563 days


#6 posted 1090 days ago

I forgot to ask you this.
When you say water did you use hot water to disolved the glue or just cold water?
Thanks

-- shdesign3.com

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

207 posts in 1146 days


#7 posted 1090 days ago

Just room temp filtered water. It appeared to go into solution without any problems. Also, after letting the mixture set for a few days it did not seem to seperate, but I still srir it prior to use.

Paul

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

View Steven H's profile

Steven H

1108 posts in 1563 days


#8 posted 1090 days ago

The gorilla glue also right?

-- shdesign3.com

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

207 posts in 1146 days


#9 posted 1090 days ago

Yes, felt that any metals and other chemicals that I could remove would be best. A MD friend suggest distilled water but just been to lazy to go get it.

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

View Steven H's profile

Steven H

1108 posts in 1563 days


#10 posted 1089 days ago

Yea

I read from painttalk
The guy is chemistry works for some company he said for waterborne coating he always use de-ionized water.
I would need to really study this.

-- shdesign3.com

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

207 posts in 1146 days


#11 posted 1089 days ago

I think I would be affraid to use it not that I would drink it, see precautions.

Also, easier to find distilled. Here is a good site for you Ask a Scientist

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

View Steven H's profile

Steven H

1108 posts in 1563 days


#12 posted 1089 days ago

Distilled water is cheaper than de-ionized

But thanks for the links. That helped a lot!

-- shdesign3.com

View hfrankjr's profile

hfrankjr

3 posts in 1187 days


#13 posted 1033 days ago

How can I tell if I might have to put on a third coat? Or would that be overkill?

-- Wood butcher with 60 years of experience

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

207 posts in 1146 days


#14 posted 1033 days ago

Try it on scrap samples of the wood you are using to see which suits you and if there is a differance.

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

1957 posts in 2050 days


#15 posted 143 days ago

This is a pretty interesting subject for us as we have been doing a lot of jobs in Alder and a recent job in Maple. We use Charles’ product and with excellent success. His product has been awesome and it tends to last a long time in that I buy what amounts to being 2 gallons of product and it will get us through a couple of jobs.

That said, we are running low and so I decided to try this titebond liquid hide glue formula. I bought the liquid hide glue at woodcraft and I am very excited to use it as a conditioner. Thanks for the info.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

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