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Stickley #369 Morris Chair #4: Ladder Back

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Blog entry by pintodeluxe posted 03-09-2014 04:27 AM 3538 reads 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Slant Arms and Side Slats Part 4 of Stickley #369 Morris Chair series Part 5: Corbels, Pegs, and Washers »

This is the Morris Chair I am building.

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Well it’s time to make the corbels so I cut a tongue on some 1-1/8” thick stock. The tongue is 3/4” wide to fit snugly in the leg dado.

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Once the tongue is cut, I place the corbel blanks in a jig to trace the curved shape.

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Here the shape of the corbel has been transferred to the blanks.

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I rough cut the corbels at the bandsaw, cutting as close to the line as possible.

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Next I pattern rout the corbels to final shape.

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I avoid routing the end grain section of the corbel, because it can cause chipout. I prefer to sand the narrow end of the corbel to final shape.

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Chamfering the diamond shape on the front legs is pretty easy. Just tilt the table to 15 degrees and sand to your line. Chamfering the rear legs is a bit more challenging because of the angle. To chamfer the back of the rear leg set the table angle to 22 degrees (miter gauge at 90 degrees). To chamfer the front of the rear legs set the table angle to 8 degrees (miter gauge at 90 degrees). To chamfer the sides of the rear legs set the table angle to 15 degrees (miter gauge +7 degrees on one side, and -7 degrees on the other side).

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The settings above work for a chair that has armrests angled to 7 degrees. Adjust accordingly if your plan calls for a different angle.

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Side assembly glueup.

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Side assembly complete.

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Tenons chamfered to final shape at the oscillating belt sander.

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Here you can see how the chamfered diamond follows the angle of the armrest.

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Now I turn my attention to the ladder back assembly. Instead of laminating strips for the curved backslats, I cut them from solid 8/4 stock. This way I can use a dado blade to establish offset tenons before I cut the curved shape. Another option is to use flat back slats with no curve at all.

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I put my oscillating belt sander to work again sanding the slats to my layout line. I start with 36 grit, and work up through 120 grit.

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I sand the parts with a ROS to 150 grit, and fine tune the tenon fit with a sanding block.

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I run the slats through the router table on edge to ease the sharp corners.

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Ladder back glueup.

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I use a sled at the tablesaw to make the angled cut on the armrests.

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Run the armrest through the router table on edge. This way the router bearing won’t dive into the holes drilled in your armrest, and bobble the cut.

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Well, that’s it for this entry. Next up will be fitting the corbels, and making pegs & washers for the backrest adjustment mechanism

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush



9 comments so far

View goggy's profile

goggy

73 posts in 2882 days


#1 posted 03-09-2014 12:07 PM

Nicely done.

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

5257 posts in 3347 days


#2 posted 03-09-2014 12:28 PM

Clever way of doing several operations.

Well done,
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View Roger's profile

Roger

19878 posts in 2269 days


#3 posted 03-09-2014 12:49 PM

Some seriously nice machining.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2799 days


#4 posted 03-09-2014 12:54 PM

Great work and great working routines. Your chair will be a beaut.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View sras's profile

sras

4392 posts in 2595 days


#5 posted 03-09-2014 03:31 PM

Always fun to watch you work!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5056 posts in 2613 days


#6 posted 03-10-2014 01:03 AM

Looks like she’s coming along great! Looking forward to the next installment!

-- Dean

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

2575 posts in 1722 days


#7 posted 03-10-2014 01:21 AM

Very educational, thank you!

-- Art

View NormG's profile

NormG

5506 posts in 2469 days


#8 posted 03-10-2014 11:04 PM

Great progress, can’t wait to whole chair

-- Norman - I never never make a mistake, I just change the design.

View PPK's profile

PPK

212 posts in 275 days


#9 posted 11-18-2016 04:51 PM

I like the way you make your tenons! I don’t think I’ve ever made a thru tenon, and that’ll be a learning curve for me, ‘cause I always have the shoulder and the “end of the hole” to hide any imperfections. I’m watching and learning, I want to build one of these soon.

I do have access to a nice leather sewing machine (I made 100 or so leather pliers cases back in the day, and Leathercraft is one of my hobbies that I had/have and just need to dust off) so maybe I’ll follow suit and make the cushions myself. I also gave my wife a Cadillac sewing machine for Christmas last year, and I’ve been trying to warm her up to the idea of making me some nice canvas cushion covers too ;-)

I also really dig your big old Delta Jointer and your bandsaw. It’s sad that Delta went down the tubes. I have a Delta jointer, (the X5 model that they discontinued some years ago) and it’s decent, but nothing like the good old ones.

-- Pete

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