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Arts and Crafts Entertainment Center / Sideboard #1: Side Panels

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Blog entry by pintodeluxe posted 415 days ago 1883 reads 9 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Arts and Crafts Entertainment Center / Sideboard series Part 2: Pattern Routing Curves, Mortiser Mod, Side Panel Glueup »

Here is the next project, an entertainment center that is reminiscent of a Stickley sideboard. The central slat detail gives a nod to Kevin Rodel. The backsplash features my “wedge and strap” detail, also found on my A&C dressers.

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Leg blanks are laminated from 3/4” stock. Next I add 1/4” thick veneers on two sides. Even though the finished veneers will only be 3/32” thick, I leave them 1/4” thick for now. I find that 1/4” strips plane up better, and are easier to glue to the leg blanks.

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The only tricky thing about this glueup is making sure the thin strips stay proud of the leg blanks.

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To establish the correct reveal, I insert a shim under the leg blank. This creates a 1/8” reveal top and bottom.

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Now the leg is assembled in its rough state.

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The next step is trimming the veneer flush at the router table.

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After trimming one edge with a flush trim bit…

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Now I have oversized leg blanks with 4 square corners. They will be planed down to 1-3/4” square. This requires some forethought to prevent plowing through your veneers. For this project I used 1-9/16” blank + 3/16” total veneer width = 1-3/4” leg.

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Here is my setup to cut stopped grooves in the legs. The grooves will accept corbels on all four legs. Notice the stop on the router fence, and the Emerson clamp guide. I use the clamp guide like a featherboard to hold the leg in position as I route the groove.

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The groove is cut to a depth of 1/4” in two passes.

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Next I decided on a shape for the corbel, and made a pattern out of MDF core plywood. After bandsawing to rough shape, the corbel was carpet-taped to the pattern.
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Pattern routing quickly produces 4 identical corbels. I used my dado gauge board to pick a stock thickness to match my router bit. I planed the corbel stock to thickness before I shaped them.

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Then I notched the bottom of the corbels to fit around the rounded groove. An alternate method would be to chisel the groove square. I like the notch method, as it hides any imperfections in the joint.

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Here you can see how the notches help with fitting the corbels. One corbel required a quick pass at the oscillating belt sander to lay flush with the leg.

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I cut 1/4” grooves in the legs to receive the panels and rails. The top rails have haunched tenons.

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Here we see the back of the panel, which is flush with the inside edges of the legs. The panel is 1/2” thick with a rabbeted edge.

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Side panel mock-up complete.

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-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush



9 comments so far

View Kyle's profile

Kyle

109 posts in 1143 days


#1 posted 415 days ago

Wow… this is awesome. It looks like you got started with this as soon as you finished the chest of drawers.

-- Kyle

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3025 posts in 1313 days


#2 posted 415 days ago

I told my wife I would take the month of February off. I guess I didn’t quite make it.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View rodneyh's profile

rodneyh

126 posts in 1163 days


#3 posted 414 days ago

I’ve got some projects coming up with large legs as well, and I’m not sure how I’ll build them. What made you go with the 1/4” veneer, rather than a lock miter and square center section? I’ve never done either, and am looking for pros and cons.

Rod

View BigRedKnothead's profile

BigRedKnothead

3540 posts in 481 days


#4 posted 414 days ago

Good stuff. We have a lot of the same taste and shop routines.

-- Red -- “I ain't as good as I'm gonna get....but I'm better than I used to be."

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3025 posts in 1313 days


#5 posted 414 days ago

Rod,
I use the veneer method because it is a technique that is easy for me, and I can get it right 90% of the time. Once you plane veneers down to 3/32” and ease the edges, they seem to disappear. This is the method Gustav Stickley used.
The locking miter method is also valid. I think my success rate would drop somewhat with this method, and it requires a special bit. The clamping also looks awkward, since pressure needs to be applied in two directions. This is basically the same method developed by Leopold and J.G. Stickley. They dubbed it the “quadrilinear post”, and it was milled with two matching cutters in the early 1900’s. The modern locking miter version is a single cutter. One piece is routed horizontally, and the mating piece is routed vertically.
Also remember the easiest method of all, grab some rift sawn 8/4 stock!
Good luck with whatever method you choose!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1130 posts in 756 days


#6 posted 414 days ago

Willie, thank you for sharing some of your work methods. I found it quite informative. I look forward to more in this series.

-- Art

View sras's profile

sras

3611 posts in 1628 days


#7 posted 414 days ago

Nice blog on what is sure to be a great looking project!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

14500 posts in 1688 days


#8 posted 379 days ago

Great work!

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View DocStock's profile

DocStock

12 posts in 1747 days


#9 posted 119 days ago

I like the look and your techniques are spot on. Thanks for sharing.

-- Glen

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