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Twin Tenon Arts and Crafts Dining Table #6: Finishing Touches

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Blog entry by pintodeluxe posted 667 days ago 1580 reads 3 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Keyed Tenons are Mirror-Image Part 6 of Twin Tenon Arts and Crafts Dining Table series no next part

Top finished

Frame assembled

Four-inch long T30 lags secure the top timbers.

Laminated or not?


By laying out my jointlines carefully, I was able to laminate some 8/4 and 5/4 together. The glueline is at the angle of the timber, so it is not visible. In addition, I laminated some thin veneers on both sides.

Back to the project page… http://lumberjocks.com/projects/71281

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush



9 comments so far

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4136 posts in 1535 days


#1 posted 667 days ago

Looking very, very nice! What did you use to color and finish it? How are you going to attach the top?

Love the laminated pieces.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3202 posts in 1397 days


#2 posted 667 days ago

Brandon,
The finish is Rodda #19 oil based stain and two coats of Valspar 60 sheen lacquer sprayed with HVLP.
Next I will wax it with Howards Walnut wax.
The top is attached with 3” T30 lags. There are 3 lags on each end assembly that screw up into the top through oversized holes.
Thanks

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6731 posts in 1735 days


#3 posted 667 days ago

Awesome table, Love the breadboard ends, and great finish.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View AJswoodshop's profile

AJswoodshop

1057 posts in 860 days


#4 posted 667 days ago

Great job on the table!

AJ

-- If I can do it.....so can you! -AJswoodshop

View Bsmith's profile

Bsmith

294 posts in 1254 days


#5 posted 667 days ago

Great job. Tell more about the angled lamination. I’m having some issues getting thick stock, but when I laminate it’s very noticeable. Thanks for posting.

-- Bryan

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3202 posts in 1397 days


#6 posted 666 days ago

Bryan,
I know what you mean about finding thick stock. I have difficulty finding 12/4 stock, and even when I get some from the sawmill, it is usually ratty and full of knots. Because these timbers have angles cut on each end, it is a perfect place to hide the glue line. However face gluing 8/4 to 5/4 leaves a notable seam on the sides. That is why I laminated 1/4” thick oak over the sides. After planing to final dimensions, the side laminate was reduced to 3/32” or so. Once the edges are eased, the jointline dissapears.
Thanks

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View schroeder's profile

schroeder

664 posts in 2709 days


#7 posted 666 days ago

Looking Great! – That table will be appreciated for generations to come – Nice Work!

Schroeder

-- The Gnarly Wood Shoppe

View JohnnyStrawberry's profile

JohnnyStrawberry

235 posts in 902 days


#8 posted 597 days ago

From the first pic, man you need a lumber rack… LOL
The owner of the lumber yard where I get my lumber from, told me that kiln drying oak that is thicker than 6/4 is a pain in the …kiln. They don’t even keep 8/4 oak of any grade. He is over 70, phd in wood technology, and still passionate about any wood. I think I should go there more often to spend a Saturday with selecting and talking about wood. They have a pretty photo gallery about their wood on picasa. Check it out.

-- What are those few hours of mine compared to those decades Mother Nature has put in it!

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3202 posts in 1397 days


#9 posted 597 days ago

Hey Johnny, For a commercial lumberyard, thick oak is a pain. They want to turn product quickly. The problem with most kilns is they don’t air dry long enough. If you put green oak in a kiln, it never ends well. For me, I air dry 8/4 oak for 2 years then kiln dry it myself. This way the lumber is completely dry, and is not prone to cracking or warping. The wood I buy has usually been air drying in a barn for many years, and simply needs to be finished off in the kiln.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

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