LumberJocks

Driftwood table #2: Research and a bit of work continues

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by peterrum posted 1103 days ago 1304 reads 0 times favorited 1 comment Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Slow progress Part 2 of Driftwood table series no next part

Some of the outside surface of the piece and the inside of the stump are very rough and needed a bit of grinding. Again a little bit of research and I found another woodworker who was using a Kutzall grinding head on his work so I decided to try the same. I went online and ordered one for my angle grinder and one for my die grinder. They arrived fairly quickly in the mail so I put them to work. They have worked pretty good, they remove alot of wood fast which is what I was looking for. With a bit of practice you can become reasonably proficient with their use. Make sure you are wearing heavy leather gloves when using these grinders. The leather saved my hands a couple of times when the heads grabbed onto the wood and wanted to take off.

http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa385/peterrum/Driftwood%20table/Kutzallgrindinghead.jpg

http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa385/peterrum/Driftwood%20table/Grindingtheinside.jpg

The surface wood of the stump has a grey patina to it but this has to be removed as the wood is too weathered and soft for a decent finish. I tried a test with some shellac on the original surface and it ended up looking like mud so that pretty well made my mind up for me and the outer surface has to come off. I started by sanding with some 40 grit paper but it was taking an awfully long time to get to the good wood.

http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa385/peterrum/Driftwood%20table/Rootcolour.jpg

http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa385/peterrum/Driftwood%20table/Grain.jpg

How can I do this faster? It was just going to take too long. So a bit of research again and i found that some people have used the crushed walnut shells for sandblasting decks and the outside of log homes. Its alot better on the lungs and the environment so it might just work for me. I was able to find a local shop that sold it in 50lb. bags for $20 and a friend of mine had a small sandblaster that I could borrow for this part of the job. So I suited up with PPE and went to work. Here is the result.

http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa385/peterrum/Driftwood%20table/Sandblasting1.jpg

http://i1195.photobucket.com/albums/aa385/peterrum/Driftwood%20table/Sandblasting2.jpg

The blasting cleaned up alot of the surface but I will still have to hand sand all of the surfaces. I expect that I will be sanding starting with 40 grit, then 100, then 120. We will see once I get to that stage. I am going to put this project away until the fall/winter as the fishing is too good right now and this will have to wait until I have many spare hours to commit to it.

-- Carpe Diem



1 comment so far

View JRL's profile

JRL

104 posts in 1165 days


#1 posted 1102 days ago

Hi, Peter.
I appreciate how you delve into new approaches to tackle the job.

Personally, I think the result after blasting looks fantastic—ready to show.

Good work!

-- Jay in Changsha

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase