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Turning a basic Elipse

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Blog entry by peteg posted 10-23-2011 05:18 AM 1803 reads 5 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I thought that the method used for the Textured Elipse I posted recently may be of interest to some of the “new to turning” folk, it is realy quite a simple process but accuracy with setting it up in the lathe is esssential if you want to achieve a nice clean glue up at the finish.
This is a very rough sketch showing the 3 pieces of stock used, the centre piece of course is a scraficial block, the glued edges must be true & dead flat or you will have gaps in the joint later.


this is the block set up & part turned ready to hollow out


I normall start the hollow with a forstner bit but you can get straight into it with a hollower


Hollowing out

this is the turn piece before splitting away the “carrier” block, split htis with a sharp knife & clean up the paper remnants from the edges ready to glue up the two halves

glueing up , take care to line up the edges
basically that is it,

This is the gear I used for the texturing on the one posted (not this one) but you can use whatever you have on hand, this pastes dries in about 15 mins and is easily reshaped & painted to your liking,
Any comments or question welcame, thanks for the look

-- Pete G: If you always do what you always did you'll always get what you always got



17 comments so far

View Bob Collins's profile

Bob Collins

1554 posts in 2349 days


#1 posted 10-23-2011 08:55 AM

Thanks for that lot Pete,I thought it was joined but your gluing was to good to see. Have never thought of using paste so I am in the “new to REAL turning” group. Between your’s and Sam’s work there is so little I know.
Haven’t got the rugby results but hope your guys do well, one day you will get the Betisloe Cup back.

-- Bob C, Australia. I love sharing as long as it is not my tools

View peteg's profile

peteg

2904 posts in 1488 days


#2 posted 10-23-2011 09:07 AM

Hey Bob, new to REAL turning, YER RIGHT, “B”... y Aussies…... do you think I haven’t seen your earlier work on AAW, pull the other one Bob, ::: )))
(You do have to get the initial join up spot on, or it will show)
BTW.. is there another cup as well we have to get LOL
good on ya Mate

Hows the post op ? hope alls doin OK cheers Pete

-- Pete G: If you always do what you always did you'll always get what you always got

View Bob Collins's profile

Bob Collins

1554 posts in 2349 days


#3 posted 10-23-2011 12:44 PM

Hard fought game, nice to see your team won. Did I spell that cup wrong?
Post op going well, got rid of the crutches, a couple more weeks therapy. Have a couple of projects underway and then must try the eclipse. Did you see Sam’s blog on doing his ringed vases? Another one to try.
Won an award at a craft show in Melbourne for one of my turned, carved and pierced projects, pick it up on 25th Nov. Enjoy the rugby celebrations Pete. Cheers Bob.

-- Bob C, Australia. I love sharing as long as it is not my tools

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4826 posts in 2547 days


#4 posted 10-23-2011 01:11 PM

Very nice Pete.

‘Dead flat’ and ‘Dead center’ – I guess those are some kind of metric measurements.

I knew about turning with paper glued between layers, but never thought about vertically in a vase. Neat. New to me.

Thanks for the info,
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View Loucarb's profile

Loucarb

2388 posts in 2111 days


#5 posted 10-23-2011 01:14 PM

Thanks for sharing Pete. I’m going to have to give this a try.

View vipond33's profile

vipond33

1405 posts in 1163 days


#6 posted 10-23-2011 02:12 PM

Of course, now I see. I’ve done split turnings before but only for shallow posts on a cabinet face in reproduction work.
I suppose, maybe? you could cut out most of the interior of the sacrificial piece with a jigsaw prior to glue up, saving a lot of the hollowing work. Making an oval ring or doughnut as it were.
If you make the centre block quite thick, split and paper glue the exterior pieces, turn only the exterior (no hollowing) and then split everything apart (rejoin) you could produce fancy high relief ellipses for applique. Got to try it.
Thanks for the paste info and the very helpful photo’s.

-- gene@toronto.ontario.canada : dovetail free since '53, critiques always welcome.

View olympicmaple's profile

olympicmaple

5 posts in 1073 days


#7 posted 10-23-2011 02:13 PM

is anyone interested in some figured maple turning squares? I have burl as well.360-464-0204

-- mike@olympicmaple.com

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11549 posts in 1771 days


#8 posted 10-23-2011 10:28 PM

Clever idea, Pete. Thanks for showing us. I’ll have to try that one day. That is pretty slick. I like the paper idea for a dividing surface!

.............Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Bearpie's profile

Bearpie

2587 posts in 1683 days


#9 posted 10-24-2011 12:11 AM

Nifty idea! Thanks for posting and showing us new tricks. I’m not exactly a novice but I still have a long way to go to be in the “expert” class.

-- Erwin, Jacksonville, FL

View peteg's profile

peteg

2904 posts in 1488 days


#10 posted 10-24-2011 12:50 AM

Thanks for the interest, hope I see some of your trial pieces. Steve, the “dead” is an alternative reference used down our way in place of “absolute” flat or centre or whatver. point being if you dont get your centre right then the halves when split will not line up (will be off centre)
The last photo with the gear sitting on a sketch pad, this is the paper I used 110 grm weight, splite easy & cleans up just as easy

-- Pete G: If you always do what you always did you'll always get what you always got

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2654 posts in 2192 days


#11 posted 10-24-2011 01:20 AM

G’day Pete, I have been trying to figure out how I would go about turning a round, flat flask/vase and I think you have given me the key on how to do it. Thanks! For the next few months it it just be scribbling notes but come February/March I will give this a try.
Have a great day!

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View ChuckV's profile (online now)

ChuckV

2427 posts in 2193 days


#12 posted 10-24-2011 01:24 AM

I am not a turner, but thought that this might be interesting to some people. I once visited the Old Schwamb Mill. It was fascinating.

They have several eccentric lathes that were, and still are, used to make oval picture frames. There is a description of how the lathes work here. One of the lathes is a massive device in the basement. It is a part of the structure of the building itself. When it gets running, the whole building seems to be shaking.

-- “That it will never come again / Is what makes life so sweet. ” ― Emily Dickinson

View peteg's profile

peteg

2904 posts in 1488 days


#13 posted 10-24-2011 08:56 AM

fasinating site ChuckV, thanks for the heads up :)

-- Pete G: If you always do what you always did you'll always get what you always got

View mafe's profile

mafe

9550 posts in 1755 days


#14 posted 10-24-2011 10:08 AM

You are amazing Pete.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View Roz's profile

Roz

1660 posts in 2452 days


#15 posted 10-25-2011 12:12 AM

Very informative Pete. thanks.

-- Terry Roswell, L.A. (Lower Alabama) "Life is what happens to you when you are making other plans."

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