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SHOP ALONG #7: hey kids - its howdedodit time

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Blog entry by patron posted 191 days ago 1064 reads 0 times favorited 32 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: just sheeting around the shop Part 7 of SHOP ALONG series Part 8: mas or menos (very high up) »

in our last episode
we left off here

the sunday turned windy and cold
so all i got done was some temp staging
to see about working up high
and a couple of evening home early got some panels up

the next weekend was a wash too
wind and no work on the walls
i don’t mind some wind
but when it is up to speed
the panels can fly quickly while i am raising them
so i wait

went to work that week
and took wed and thur off
to continue paneling
wed. was howling wind
thurs was one of the worst storms in some time here
rain galore

back to work fri and sat
got the lady more or less happy by then
when she hired me she asked when i would be done
and how much would it cost

“when you are as broke as i am
we are done”

guess we hit that sat no work for a bit yet
as she recoups

so today sunday got up early and went at it
raising the panels on the skids i made for them
me up on the scaffold with a rope tied to a clamp
on the middle of the panel and hauling it up

then placing it up under the top holder
and over and behind the two bottom ones
(think sliding cab doors where the top track is deeper
tan the bottom one)
they are left open plenty so i can jump the panel up
and slide it around easily where i could leave it be
even with the wind while i got my nail gun

then move the ‘helpers’ to the next place
and keep on going
adding a metal ‘z’ strip between courses
to keep out any rain running down the panels

the ‘mexican scaffolds’ are prety simple
a triangle of OSB (in this case)
and two 2×4’2 in a corner configuration
screwed to the wall top and bottom
with the planking screwed to the tops
to keep them from twisting and racking
they are very solid when placed this way
and can be moved rather easily

with a leg to the ground up in the inside corner
with a metal steak as a backup so they don’t slide on the ground

the top panel was about where i could reach it from the scaffold so i had to figure
how to hold it up there too as i could just reach the top plate to nail it
without re-setting the scaffolds higher
so i made some ‘helpers’ that came from the sides
(again these are not flat to the panels
but have a loose space behind them
so the panel can be placed easily
then dropped down on the tapered back lower ‘helpers’
that seats the panel where it belongs

as the top of the panels was a foot over the top plate
and pre-notched for the truss tails to drop into
and with a heel riser in them to nail to as the ceiling cord sits on the top plates
this ties all the floor support beams the wall studs and the joists together like hurricane clips
so the whole structure is connected from the base to the roof
without a seam at the roof line where the trusses are toenailed to the top plate
as in conventional framing
the sheets are run across the studs
and every course staggered (like bricks)
to keep all the wall in one solid unit

well i had to move the staging this afternoon
when i got half the wall done

and it is ready for tomorrow to finish that long wall

so for now this is it for today
tools are put away
the sky is darkening with rain clouds now
i might work on it or not tomorrow
we’ll just have to see how it goes

as always thank you for looking
be safe
and enjoy your holiday

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle



32 comments so far

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14416 posts in 2181 days


#1 posted 191 days ago

David, Why not get the guy that took the picture of you up on the scaffold to help?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View patron's profile

patron

12851 posts in 1846 days


#2 posted 191 days ago

that pic was over a few years old bob
when i was prepping the house for the new shop
notice the paneling is twisted and warped
from rain and sun for years
i had to strap a 2×4 lag bolted to the studs to flatten it
and then put 1 1/2” panel insulation on it
then the shop walls up against that
(will be lagged too back into the top plate of the house )
i just put that pic in
to show the ‘mexican scaffolds’

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14416 posts in 2181 days


#3 posted 191 days ago

I wondered why it was a bit odd. Thought it might be from the other side of the shop or something. You are using your head now!; getting all the sheathing up with out breaking your back. Nice job. Too bad I’m 2000 miles too far a way to give you a hand.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View patron's profile

patron

12851 posts in 1846 days


#4 posted 191 days ago

lucky for you
i could sit back
and drink coffee
while you work

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

11271 posts in 1180 days


#5 posted 191 days ago

I employ the concept of “work smart, not hard”, whenever possible….
You obviously, put that to practice also!!!
You are quite innovative in how you go about working alone, without breaking your back or neck!
I enjoy watching your progress. Thanks for taking the time to inform and educate!!!

I too, wish I were closer. That way I could be a “Patron Helper”!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View patron's profile

patron

12851 posts in 1846 days


#6 posted 191 days ago

with a cute little suit
like an elve huh

we could get some special kool-aid
(mixed with beer for you of course)

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

9578 posts in 1195 days


#7 posted 191 days ago

David, I learn something every time you post something! Those “Mexican scaffolds” would have been the ticket when I resheathed my hay barn with sheet metal. They look WAY more stable than the extension ladders I used. Being your helper would be an education in how to do “stuff”.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View patron's profile

patron

12851 posts in 1846 days


#8 posted 191 days ago

thanks andy

i read thru some of the last post comments
and just designed (in my head)
just about every way i could think of
from my car top with some sheeting on it
(in the roof rack i made)

parked next to the wall with different sized ladders
(for different height panels)

the problem was how to get the panel
out from under the ladder
when i got up high enough to place them

block and tackles were suggested too
but for my off and on time out there
way to much work to use
especially as you point out
working from a ladder
right tight to the wall

then a ‘teeter-totter’ idea was given too
but how to stand on one end of a plank
and raise it more than a few feet of the ground
and how to nail it
from 16’ away lol

then a set of stair stringers
so i could ‘walk’ up them with a full sheet to work
but with a sloping ground
i would have to cut them for every panel then start again for the next course
with another set of even longer ones
way to much work and lots of scrap lumber when i got done

these i used are all lumbers bought for the walls themselves
and outside of a few screw holes haven’t been cut yet
so will be used as intended when i get to that stage

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2785 posts in 2007 days


#9 posted 191 days ago

4 or 5 more sheets and that side is a wrap!
That’s a lot of work for one man
but you’re moving right along…
I still can’t get over that rain pic
I thought it was always Sunny and Clear in NM!

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View patron's profile

patron

12851 posts in 1846 days


#10 posted 191 days ago

well michael
you are right about the weather here

it is always sunny and clear
somewhere in the state

a number of years ago
i had started the back deck
and took a four day weekend
to work on it

woke the next morning
to two feet of snow

i barely got out of the drive
and didn’t get a thing done on the deck
just sat by the fire
reading

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View janice's profile

janice

1079 posts in 1930 days


#11 posted 191 days ago

It’s fascinating to watch this! Cant wait to see this finished! My husband bought scaffolding when we built our room addition. Three sections to reach the peak of the cabin, then he stood on a 5 gallon bucket on top of all that because it wasn’t tall enough. Since then he bought the pony section. I just know I was glad I wasn’t there to see him on that bucket on top of all that. Now we can probably sell it all, pretty sure we’re not gonna ever need it again. Keep the pictures coming on this project please!

-- Janice

View patron's profile

patron

12851 posts in 1846 days


#12 posted 191 days ago

hi janice

my buddy has scaffolds too
but he lent them out a while back
haven’t heard from him since
and renting them around here
is a long game
all the plasterers have them tied up for months in advance
(sometimes they have them all the way around a building)
from the ground to the top of the peaks

the actual triangle part of these
can just be stored flat for later use
all the rest is for the building itself
so isn’t an added expense

to move them up or down is easy
just change the angle of the leg
the more weight you put on the top
the tighter they get to the wall
(so long as the leg doesn’t slip out on the ground)
why i back them there
with a stake

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7454 posts in 2557 days


#13 posted 191 days ago

Hi David,

You’re making GREAT progress!

I remember that little triangle that you posted shortly after you left here… I figured you’d use that somehow…
The Clamp tied to a Pull rope also went through my mind…
You “Pulled” it off! Worked SUPER GOOD!

How are you going to protect it during the winter?
... that OSB is pretty rugged isn’t it? ... can withstand some rain & snow, etc.?

Thank you for the nice pictures!

That is going to be ONE SUPER COOL Workshop!!

Take care… Be Safe…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View patron's profile

patron

12851 posts in 1846 days


#14 posted 191 days ago

i don’t know why they don’t use waterproof glue
in the OSB joe

the stuff will swell and delaminate unprotected
i will have to paint it soon
(or spray tompsons water seal on it)
if i can’t get a roof on before winter

standing it will be better than the floor

all i can do is believe
that it will come together somehow
worrying about it
doesn’t help me much

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View degoose's profile

degoose

6883 posts in 1859 days


#15 posted 191 days ago

Slowly but surely… It will happen… and when you build it they will come…

-- Drink twice... and don't bother to cut... @ lazylarrywoodworks.com.au For lovers of all things timber...

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