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tutorial #5: easy utility doors - this one insulated

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Blog entry by patron posted 06-15-2013 12:51 AM 1794 reads 2 times favorited 32 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: framing tips for shop and house wall builds Part 5 of tutorial series no next part

thought some of you might like to know a simple way to make utility doors
for closets or sheds (or whatever)
like these i made for the new spray booth i am building
from straight 2×4’s and some 7/16” OSB (wafferwood)

as the booth is not enclosed by the ongoing shop build yet
i need it to be insulated too
from summer heat and winter cold
so i put 1 1/2” of sheet insulation
in between two OSB panels
(whatever you might have will work too
especially if they only have one panel)

the frames for any one is dado-ed (they could be rabbeted edges too)
the thickness of whatever material you are using

for single panel just one dado
and the 2×4’s can be on edge
making them thinner for say a standard lock and handle
for insulated two dado’s
(for this you might have to invent some handle and locking type
or do a cut-out in the thicker door
with a thinner block to attach to
for a standard handle

the tops of the stiles (sides up and down)
are notched over at least past the depth of the panels

and the rails (across top and bottom)
are just square cross-cut to the length needed
to make the door as wide as you want
(for a mid-rail dado the same
just do the panel dado on both sides)

and cut your panels the space there plus the dado depth by two
(i usually do a depth like 1/2” so just add 1”
to whatever the inner width and length is for the panels
in that inside frame size)

for the corner ‘joinery’ i just glue and screw them together
with long deck screws
setting the heads deep enough
to clear any trimming if needed on the edges when fitting
to the casing
(you could do any joinery if desired here
just account for any extra length in the rails)

to keep the wind and bugs out
and for winter sealing on old doors
(everyone needs them after those foam tape seals don’t work
or the aluminum finned ones with the little bead of rubber quit working)
i make re-trofit 1×2’s with a 1/8” grove (1/8” in from the edge)

and insert those folded foam and vinyl ones
you see in the box stores
they have a finned barb that holds in a 1/8” x 7/16” deep grove

just sand the edge of the saw kerf slightly
as the sharp corner can catch the vinyl and make it ‘pucker’ when inserted

cut them to fit the casing and with the door closed
they aren’t mitered
as they fold together with no gaps in the corners
i make a temp block to mark with
the width of the stock i use and add 5’16”
for the weatherstrip itself folded
running the block and marking the inside edge to the casing jamb
and placing the trim there to that line
i screw them in place as i have found nails just work loose
from time and tide over the years
and they too can be removed if the door opening calls for that extra width
for moving furniture or tools thru the opening

the advantage of these weatherstrips is they can be removed or replaced as needed
for any painting or re-finishing work needed without having them in the way
and getting paint or finish on them

this is a quick and cheap way to close that doorway
to traffic or just temporary
till you get the dream door installed

thanks for looking

have a safe build

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle



32 comments so far

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7150 posts in 2026 days


#1 posted 06-15-2013 01:20 AM

really nice build here david, all of its right on…and i like the the whole jam, with butter and …oooppss wrong jam, the door jamb and weather seals are spot on….now onto the pancakes, with jam….:)

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View patron's profile

patron

13145 posts in 2064 days


#2 posted 06-15-2013 01:25 AM

hmmm
pancakes
might need to make some for dinner tonight

great idea grizz

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14143 posts in 1398 days


#3 posted 06-15-2013 01:28 AM

Those look like a great “utilitarian” paneled door. I will remember these should the need arise.

It is great that you take the time to “pass on the knowledge”, by doing these tutorials. They are packed with great ideas and insights.

THANKS, for taking the time to educate a moron like me!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View patron's profile

patron

13145 posts in 2064 days


#4 posted 06-15-2013 01:36 AM

hey son
glad you remember where it comes from
i am the village idiot here
(it helps when i go to town
as i can communicate better
with the locals)

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View amagineer's profile

amagineer

1392 posts in 1320 days


#5 posted 06-15-2013 01:58 AM

Thanks David, your knowledge is of great use to me. I will keep this stored away for the future.
-don

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11369 posts in 1413 days


#6 posted 06-15-2013 02:05 AM

Thanks David, I need to build new doors for my dove house as my last one warped beyond all belief. This should be a much better design. Treated lumber/exterior ply with some good quality paint?

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7879 posts in 2775 days


#7 posted 06-15-2013 03:32 AM

Looks nice…

I don’t see any door knobs… just temporary Nails for now?

Looking GOOD!

Thank you.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2950 posts in 2225 days


#8 posted 06-15-2013 05:10 AM

Doors on… check…
How are the lights coming? Did you get the rest of the fixtures in? Switches? Wall plugs?
And what about the Exhaust Fan… and the Air Conditioner??
Has the painting begun on the interior??? :)

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View patron's profile

patron

13145 posts in 2064 days


#9 posted 06-15-2013 05:27 AM

glad to be able to help don
.

i’m good with everything but the PT frame andy
that stuff is still green (not just the color)
and unless it is held securely (like for framing for a deck)
it can dry and twist and change as it goes thru the weather
this is a border i did for the front of my deck ramp
this board was straight and true when placed
here it is after a couple of years

michael couldn’t believe it either
when he was here
i will replace it with redwood soon
go with that and you should be lovey – dovey lol
.
no knobs yet joe
just some twist wood holders so far
.
hold your horses there michael
doing the best i can there
almost ready for the next part of the build blog
got frustrated last night
and came in and watched ‘dumb and dumber’
to chill out

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View stefang's profile

stefang

13530 posts in 2057 days


#10 posted 06-15-2013 07:44 AM

Great tutorial David. Always something useful to learn from them.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View bluekingfisher's profile

bluekingfisher

1091 posts in 1702 days


#11 posted 06-15-2013 08:12 AM

As always, excellent tutorial David, simple enough in design, which can often be overlooked when trying to build something for yourself.

Thanks again for the advice.

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View ellen35's profile

ellen35

2589 posts in 2155 days


#12 posted 06-15-2013 10:21 AM

Neat… you always have the best tutorials. And… they are practical too!
Glad to see everything coming along.
Ellen

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View patron's profile

patron

13145 posts in 2064 days


#13 posted 06-15-2013 01:53 PM

thanks mike
as you well know
learning at our age
can sometimes take longer
than doing
.
you got that right blue
we can and do over think many things
making them hard to get done sometimes
.
thanks again ellen
when the chips are down
and money and time are short
got to use what we can find
to do the job

they can always be re-done later
in a better way

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View littlecope's profile

littlecope

2950 posts in 2225 days


#14 posted 06-15-2013 02:18 PM

Yeah, well… Okay…
Do what you want, you’re going to do it anyway…
Just do the best you can… BUT DON’T TAKE ALL DAY!! LOL

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

View patron's profile

patron

13145 posts in 2064 days


#15 posted 06-15-2013 06:00 PM

that’s good of you michael

ever since you left
i have had to do all my work
myself

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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