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Social Network Marketing - Facebook #1: Why you should market on Facebook.

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Blog entry by pashley posted 03-02-2010 03:46 PM 916 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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First of all, what is Facebook? Facebook is the most prolific social network out there. Essentially, it’s a place to keep in touch with your family and friends, sharing messages, photos, videos, links with them, and joining them in games. You can also find old friends – and lovers – like I have, and catch up. It’s pretty easy to use too.

It originally started out on the campus of Harvard by a few undergrads looking to make an online “facebook” – a term used for the printed listing of alumnus, where they live, email, and so on. Well, it went viral quickly, as more and more people used it. Just using it makes it viral. You invite your friends, who in turn invite their friends, and so on.

Here’s some recent stats, from Facebook:

• More than 400 million active users
• 50% of active users log on to Facebook in any given day
• More than 35 million users update their status each day
• More than 60 million status updates posted each day
• More than 3 billion photos uploaded to the site each month
• More than 5 billion pieces of content (web links, news stories, blog posts, notes, photo albums, etc.) shared each week
• More than 1.5 million local businesses have active Pages on Facebook
• Average user has 130 friends on the site
• Average user sends 8 friend requests per month

Crazy, isn’t it?

So, what’s the marketing angle on this?

Obviously, exposure for your business.

You start with a personal page, and find all the friends you can. After that, you can make a page for your business, and invite those friends you made on Facebook. Facebook also will let you import your email addresses from some popular email clients, like Yahoo, and send them an invitation to join your biz page. Jumping off of that, you can take out an ad on Facebook, to be display to a specific demographic, such as male, 25-50, living in the US, speaks English, and has woodworking in their profile. You can pay a certain fee per 1,000 impressions, or pay per click, and set a daily limit on spending. That will help bring anonymous people to you. It gets a bit expensive – I paid about 50 cents per person signing up in my last campaign.

So that gets you started; then it’s up to you to post interesting, relevant information on your business page. And, you have to do it often – at least every other day. People don’t want to see a dead site when they do find you.

You can also post on your friend’s “wall” – that is essentially just a page of items that friend has posted, and things that person’s friends has also shared with him/her directly. Do this with care – you don’t want to come across too strong here. Something like, “Hey Dave, I just make another one of those jewelry boxes you like” – and post a link to your business page’s album with it. A little picture from the album should pop up with the message. So why do this, when Dave is already your friend? Because HIS friends will also see this post, and hopefully become a “fan” – a follower – of your page. It’s reasonable to believe that at least some of his friends will share his interest in woodworking, and come follow you too.

And of course it all comes back to more people exposed to your product, more people likely to buy.

-- Have a blessed day! http://newmissionworkshop.com



9 comments so far

View JAGWAH's profile

JAGWAH

929 posts in 1738 days


#1 posted 03-02-2010 03:56 PM

It maybe because the work I solicite is for larger pieces and remodeling that I haven’t earned a dime. While just about anyone can go to FB and see my business page only fellow Facebookians see your personnel page. While I have a few fans I had hoped their placing me on their page would lead to more fans which hasn’t panned out.

At best it’s a place to send someone to see a collection of my past projects thereby qualifying my ability.

While I haven’t paid to advertise my page the only ads I see are dumb pervy types that scroll on the right of my page showing hot chicks that are trying to find me and selling access to see who.

FB serves me best staying up with my kids and knowing what former friends from highschool 38 years ago are growing in their virtual gardens and little else.

Oops gotta go now seems Joey found crabs on his atoll in Island Farming.

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

View JAGWAH's profile

JAGWAH

929 posts in 1738 days


#2 posted 03-02-2010 04:25 PM

To be fair here,the idea seemed very interesting at first to me. I assumed FB had a yellow page listing of sorts where a motivated buyer could go look for an item or service, they don’t.

To sell on FB is to sell by impulse, random and haphazard. I saw the stats when I made my page and thought it impressive. But I didn’t think it through.

Most of FB’s members are there for social networking not to be inundated with ads soliciting them. The average age I woulds assume is very young while, albeit, with a growing older bunch. Of those 130 ave friends I would honestly say half is for the playing of silly games.

Recently after reaching level 50 in Farmville and still having over 1.45 million FV coins even after buying my mansion for 1 mil, I decided it was eating to much of my time. I quit and went through my 140 plus group of friends removing those who were friends only for the game. I now have about 60.

If I agreed to 1penny per hit for my ad I don’t doubt I might get 1000 lookers daily if not more from all around the world. That would only cost $10 daily $3650 yrly. This might be an exageration but hey who knows.

Good luck to anyone who tries it I would be glad to be proven overly pessimistic.

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

View FunnelStudio's profile

FunnelStudio

30 posts in 1972 days


#3 posted 03-02-2010 05:20 PM

I’m not 100% on this either. Though I should say right off the bat that I do not have, nor want, a personal facebook, so maybe there is some bias here.

I feel that a majority of people, as Jagwah (totally rad beard, p.s.!) had stated, use the site for networking. And a large amount of that population isn’t looking to through out the proper costs of woodworking. In my opinion, the best marketing is a blog/website, and just putting it everywhere, shamelessly. I do it here.

In reality nothing happens easily, just because anything is on the internet does not mean anyone will look at it. Facebook helps with an immediate presence, but it’s all about how much effort you put into it. If you spend a few hours a week posting comments on interior design blogs or sites potential customers visit with a link to your site at the end, you get some publicity for free. Plus the people who run those sites end up looking at what you do, and might feature you on their blog. I’ve done this and seen my site hits increase. Which doesn’t mean I’m getting jobs, which might just be the same as a facebook account, but atleast people know I am here! I guess it is more a matter of national/local, and where your market is, and what you feel more comfortable doing.

-- -Shaun M. Baer, http://www.craftedphiladelphia.com

View JAGWAH's profile

JAGWAH

929 posts in 1738 days


#4 posted 03-02-2010 05:34 PM

FunnelStudio I like you new manly look.

I actually did ok when I started out years ago with simple door to door fliers advertising my remodeling business. I would pick a neighborhood that looked like they could afford me and walked about 250-300 fliers out. Back then I was getting typically 10-15 calls through the following week usually closing 2-3 jobs. That kept me busy enough.

Then a few years later I paid for a company to blanket aa area with my fliers, about 5000. My phone rang the next morning at 6am. by noon I had over 30 appointments. By the end of the day 86 people called, end of the week ober 600! To say the least I was overwhelmed and ticked off quite a few people by saying I was to busy to come out.

Sometimes being popular ain’t always a good thing. I only work word of mouth now, charge more and work less, just enough to be comfortible.

-- ~Just A Guy With A Hammer~

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2135 posts in 1763 days


#5 posted 03-02-2010 05:40 PM

Aside from the observations already noted, I think the internet/social networking/mass information craze is a result of and the perpetuation of the issue that is rampant of job and task consolidation. Computers are associated with multi-tasking but it is still a reality that one can only perform one quality task at a time. There are people that are extremely good at social networking, presentation, sales, marketing, etc. And there are people that are brilliant at making product, whether it be a novel, jewelry, woodworking, etc. I see problems when those that make the product are also required to be the one to market it, and those that market are required to build. The work suffers, the marketing becomes less effective, and what you end up with is mediocre product with mediocre advertising at best. At worst, you have great advertising for a crappy product and, sadly, you might end up with a fantastic product that sends one to bankruptcy because they can’t market it. Skillsets are skillsets and people do have natural talents that can be fostered. But the Jack of all trades, master of none philosophy still stands true to me.

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View FunnelStudio's profile

FunnelStudio

30 posts in 1972 days


#6 posted 03-02-2010 06:00 PM

Thanks Jag, unfortunately, shaving cream is the best beard I can grow.

And in regards to word of mouth, I feel that is the best way to get jobs. Not only in terms of knowing you make a quality product, but that, to a certain degree, you can get more time out of a project allowing you to manufacture the job the way it should be.

And David, I think you are totally right! Making things takes focus and dedication to craft. But also, there is down time from this practice. I think this is why having a blog works for me, it serves as a break from making but also a way to focus in on what I have done, and think about designs for the future.

But you are correct about mixing marketing and making, it is two different trains of thought, and two different ways to make those trains move, even though they are both abstract ideas in the beginning. It takes a lot of brain power and can lead to overload quickly.

It also helps to have a girlfriend who does design….!

-- -Shaun M. Baer, http://www.craftedphiladelphia.com

View Greg..the Cajun  Box Sculptor's profile

Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor

5090 posts in 1962 days


#7 posted 03-02-2010 06:05 PM

I have never seen or read a facebook before and have no interest in doing so. Besides, Life is Great without it. I have never been a peerson who does something just because everyone else is doing it.

-- If retiring is having the time to be able to do what you enjoy then I have always been retired.

View pashley's profile

pashley

1023 posts in 2371 days


#8 posted 03-02-2010 06:12 PM

My point is this: keeping your name – and product – in front of people is not a bad thing, if it’s done in an interesting fashion. If people that follow my FB page are interested in my style, or in woodworking in general, that can cause them to refer me to their friends that may also follow me – if not buy from me. The more people I get on board with my fan page – the more people I’ll get following my fan page.

It’s not so much an ad as a way to build relationships – what social marketing is really all about. People can’t buy what they don’t know about – so FB and Twitter are tools that help me get my product – and expertise – in front of other people’s eyes.

-- Have a blessed day! http://newmissionworkshop.com

View pashley's profile

pashley

1023 posts in 2371 days


#9 posted 03-02-2010 06:27 PM

A great article from the New York Times on marketing your small biz with FB.

-- Have a blessed day! http://newmissionworkshop.com

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