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Can Acetone or Mineral Spirits be used to wipe down a sanded project prior to finishing.

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Blog entry by Eddie Elizondo posted 01-27-2015 07:02 PM 2804 reads 2 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I just got thru making a Guitar stand and after sanding I would like to get all of the dust off of it. I don’t want all the fine dust to ruin the finish and I heard that either Acetone or Mineral Spirits can be used to wipe down the project with a rag. Has anyone used this method or know if this is a good process.

-- Eddie -



14 comments so far

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

5257 posts in 3345 days


#1 posted 01-27-2015 07:22 PM

I always do a wipe down with Mineral Spirits. It is great at getting the fine dust off and see if you still have any sanding issues you need to go back and deal with. I do it before shellac, oils, or poly with no ill effect.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View Eddie Elizondo's profile

Eddie Elizondo

68 posts in 3301 days


#2 posted 01-27-2015 07:25 PM

This is just what I wanted to hear. Thanks Steve.

-- Eddie -

View BTimmons's profile

BTimmons

2298 posts in 1948 days


#3 posted 01-27-2015 07:49 PM

Not only does it remove the finest dust, mineral spirits will also show you any glue spots that might not be otherwise visible. That way you can sand or plane them out before finishing.

-- Brian Timmons - http://www.BigTWoodworks.com

View Roger's profile

Roger

19867 posts in 2267 days


#4 posted 01-27-2015 08:57 PM

Yep, what Steve and Brian said. :)

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2633 posts in 2572 days


#5 posted 01-28-2015 01:11 AM

I use a water-dampened (not dripping wet) cloth, which also helps to raise any grain that may raise during application of a water-borne finish. I’ve done this on projects that I’ve sanded all the way to 400 grit. Smooth!

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View Bigrock's profile

Bigrock

290 posts in 2425 days


#6 posted 01-28-2015 01:22 AM

I use Lacquer thinner and it dries much faster unless you are using lacquer or shellac as a finish. There is something in mineral spirits that is oily that i don’t like.

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5177 posts in 2657 days


#7 posted 01-28-2015 05:41 AM

I’ve used m.s. and lacquer thinner for years on all my projects, too….I haven’t used a tack cloth in years….Never liked them from the start, cause I think they make the project feel well….tacky…..The tack cloth, in my opinion, can’t get down into the pores of the wood and get the dust like m.s., a damp wet cloth, or even lacquer can….I can’t attest to acetone, cause I’ve never used it on wood, so I reserve judgement on it…....

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1917 posts in 1778 days


#8 posted 01-28-2015 09:11 PM

A Tack Cloth is designed exactly for the use you describe. It is a bit sticky, for picking up all those fine particles, and a bit static to help pull fines out of the corners and they leave no residue.
They are not a use it once and throw it away, but they have a life and are expendable and do have a cost.
The second choice is Mineral Spirits, It will leave a light oily residue that some like as it will some what ‘seal’ some of the pores and trap fines from being lifted into the finish. (This has been debated for years)
So, which method is best? try both and use the one you like.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View ChuckC's profile

ChuckC

821 posts in 2398 days


#9 posted 01-28-2015 10:52 PM

+1 for mineral spirits for cleaning and to find hidden glue.

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

5177 posts in 2657 days


#10 posted 01-28-2015 11:15 PM

Another reason I like m.s. is because when you use it on hardwwods it will show you pretty much what the project is gonna look like with a finish on it…It will make the grain “pop”......A tack cloth won’t do that…..

-- At my age, an "all--nighter" is not having to get up and pee...!!!

View Frankengruvin's profile

Frankengruvin

7 posts in 667 days


#11 posted 02-08-2015 06:37 AM

Make sure you are using “old” mineral spirits and not the Klean Strip Grean kind that looks like white latex paint in the bottle, and it comes in a white plastic bottle with a graphic of a green tree on the label. From the research I’ve been doing tonight, look for one described as “water white and crystal clear.” I repeat, DO NOT use the “green” kind for thinning!

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

8247 posts in 2891 days


#12 posted 02-08-2015 11:43 AM

+1000
That odorless green crap will leave white deposits in the finish.
I use lacquer thinner because, like an earlier poster, I don’t care for the oiliness of the paint thinner.


Make sure you are using “old” mineral spirits and not the Klean Strip Grean kind that looks like white latex paint in the bottle, and it comes in a white plastic bottle with a graphic of a green tree on the label. From the research I ve been doing tonight, look for one described as “water white and crystal clear.” I repeat, DO NOT use the “green” kind for thinning!

- Frankengruvin


-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3392 posts in 1667 days


#13 posted 02-19-2015 09:35 AM

Dont forget you can also use clean dry comprressed air.

-- Regards Robert

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

2633 posts in 2572 days


#14 posted 02-20-2015 02:24 AM



Dont forget you can also use clean dry comprressed air.

- robscastle

..and a nice soft brush.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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