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3D Modeling #1: Starting solid modeling

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Blog entry by oldnovice posted 12-05-2012 12:13 AM 1907 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of 3D Modeling series Part 2: Quick introduction to make an object »

By popular demand this will be an interactive blog to show how 3D solid modeling can make the design and build process of woodworking, or almost any project, more fun and with better plans.

The 3D modeling program is Creo Elements/Direct Modeling Express which is a FREE program from PTC (Parametric Technology Corporation) that I have been using since 2000 (then know as Solid Designer).

If you want to join this adventure, go to the download site, check the PC requirements, download the application (either 32 bit or 64 bit depending on you PC setup), install the program for you current operating system, and get ready for some easy modeling!

Creo Elements/Direct Modeling download site:
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Opening Screen of Creo Elements/Direct Modeling Express

When you open the Creo application you should see something like the following screen. The dialog box in the center is one of several tutorials to help get started and you can try these tutorials at any time. You probably can’t really see the detail of the total screen but at this point it is not that important.

Interactivity can be done with PM or emails directly so please let me know how each of you want to proceed!

The next entry will start with a real simple model!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"



6 comments so far

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5186 posts in 2984 days


#1 posted 01-03-2013 04:15 PM

It is interesting to learn that there are other 3D packages than Sketchup out there.

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

557 posts in 631 days


#2 posted 05-18-2016 01:06 AM

I didn’t realize I had this installed in a Win XP VM. I remember now that I was going to test it out.

Are you planning on doing a multi-part post on how to use this for woodworking? Because I run only Linux workstations and servers, I would rather run a native application. If this is a better option than running SketchUp in a VM, I’m gaim to learn.

-- -- Paul Bucalo: The Original Technoslick - still fixing what ain't broke

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5225 posts in 2639 days


#3 posted 05-18-2016 06:00 AM

I had planned to do so but I did not get any interest before!
If you are ONE I can continue, or start at any point you may want?

I use Windows and run a 64 bit version of Creo, however, when it was first released I ran it on a DOS machine at HP.
As I have said so many time before, it has all of what I need because I do more than just woodworking; i.e. plastic, circuit boards, mechanical design, and it has covered everything I want/need to do from 3D CAD modeling to 2D PDF print of my assemblies/parts.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

557 posts in 631 days


#4 posted 05-18-2016 11:45 AM

I think for me it comes down to two criteria that I need to meet: 1) it has to be no more difficult to learn than the status quo (i.e. SketchUp), and 2) it has to be totally usable on my present hardware/operating systems, which in this case is either Windows XP or Windows 7 in a Virtualbox virtual machine. With SketchUp, I had to turn off hardware acceleration to be able to see the work surface. I have Creo 32-bit running in the WinXP VM, and it seems to be behaving, but I haven’t tried to create anything in it.

I define totally workable as meaning that the free version is fully functional in a VM, doesn’t lack any feature I would be expected to use in the normal course of going from design to printout and/or display use. Crippleware doesn’t sit well with me, and sometimes those who use a paid version aren’t aware of how crippled the free versions are.

If you wouldn’t mind, give me a little time to play with it on my own first. I have invested in a book on how to learn SketchUp and frankly I am willing to forgo the program and ignore the investment if I found something better for my needs. Thanks.

-- -- Paul Bucalo: The Original Technoslick - still fixing what ain't broke

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

5225 posts in 2639 days


#5 posted 05-18-2016 03:54 PM

Paul, there are some “built in” tutorials in Creo that might be helpful!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Paul Bucalo's profile

Paul Bucalo

557 posts in 631 days


#6 posted 05-18-2016 04:01 PM



Paul, there are some “built in” tutorials in Creo that might be helpful!

- oldnovice

That would be great. I’ll check them out. Thanks.

-- -- Paul Bucalo: The Original Technoslick - still fixing what ain't broke

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