LumberJocks

Learning the hard way!

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by nobuckle posted 11-05-2010 12:33 AM 749 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Today I started working on a router table idea that I came up with. I currently have a router table (more like a cabinet really) but it takes up to much room in my shop. If you’ve read my profile you know that I only have 99 sq. ft. of main shop space, so maximizing space is a constant challenge. I’ve decided to move the left-hand table saw extension of my table saw to the right side and replace it with some material that could be used for a router table. The material I selected was part of a commercially made cabinet from a doctors office or something. I should have known better. The material was commercial grade particle baord about 5/4 thick. I thought that if I used some threaded inserts that I could bolt it to my table saw. BIG mistake! As you have probably guessed the threaded insert did not hold. In the process I scrapped two inserts. To me that translates into $3.20 right in the trash. Needless to say I have to return to my mental drawing board and find a different way to accomplish the task. I realize that there are anumber of ways to solve the problem, but finding the right one for my application is becoming frustrating. Any and all hepl would be greatly appreciated.

-- Doug - Make an effort to live by the slogan "We try harder"



10 comments so far

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1580 days


#1 posted 11-05-2010 12:40 AM

You might try epoxying the inserts.

-- Life is good.

View cabs4less's profile

cabs4less

235 posts in 1419 days


#2 posted 11-05-2010 12:50 AM

what if you banded the top with hardwood then used the inserts in the hardwood when you band the top use plenty of glue and maybe bicuts or splines to help with alignment the glue bond will be plenty strong by itself partilce board is still wood technically

-- As Best I Can

View nobuckle's profile

nobuckle

1120 posts in 1418 days


#3 posted 11-05-2010 04:53 AM

Thanks for the feedback, I really appreciate it. I do have some 2 part epoxy, but i’m not sure about its tensil strength. A friend of mine builds rockets for a hobby and he has some epoxy that has a very high tensil strength. Any reccomendations on a certain brand of epoxy I might use? I also considered banding the material with hardwood and using the inserts in conjuction. That may be the way I go. What are your thoughts about incorporating a piece of t-track into the piece of hardwood banding? My thought was that the t-track would make the table top easy to remove if need be. Again, thanks for the input.

-- Doug - Make an effort to live by the slogan "We try harder"

View cabs4less's profile

cabs4less

235 posts in 1419 days


#4 posted 11-05-2010 06:03 AM

if its moveable then it might move when you don’t want it to but it wouldnt be to bad to realighn the tops every now and then so I’d say if your fine wit that go for it

-- As Best I Can

View joeE's profile

joeE

4 posts in 1801 days


#5 posted 11-05-2010 11:16 AM

Use 2” x 2” x 1/16” aluminum angle bolted to the saw and and the top flat of the angle flush to the saw top.
Drill and countersink bolts to hold the particle board, rebate the particle board top so it is flush with the angle.
I used 3/4” marine ply with very small cutouts to allow for the bolt heads (3) in the angle to saw connection.
15 years on the last saw. done the same for my new saw.

View cabs4less's profile

cabs4less

235 posts in 1419 days


#6 posted 11-05-2010 07:49 PM

now joeE thats a great idea i have never thought of that that solves his problems from flushing the tops to securing the table and adds a ton of strenght nobuckle i would go wit joeE idea

-- As Best I Can

View nobuckle's profile

nobuckle

1120 posts in 1418 days


#7 posted 11-05-2010 11:35 PM

I’ve created a sketchup model of what I think joeE is suggesting. Yes? No? The lettering is small. You can see that I have created the aluminum rail that attaches to the table saw. Also you can see the heads of the bolts that would be used to attach the router table to the rail. I’ve beefed up the aluminum angle to 1/8”. The material I have is a little thinner than what’s shown in the picture but I can make it work. This may be the best solution. Thanks for all the input.

-- Doug - Make an effort to live by the slogan "We try harder"

View cabs4less's profile

cabs4less

235 posts in 1419 days


#8 posted 11-06-2010 01:50 AM

nice cad drawing i still learning sketch up i was taught on A+ Cad just rember angle iron has a fillet in the inside coner so you might have to chamfer the bottom edge of the table to allow for it

-- As Best I Can

View joeE's profile

joeE

4 posts in 1801 days


#9 posted 11-06-2010 06:05 AM

Pretty good image, router plate and slot are more or less as I had them. Can’t have a slot in my latest saw as the fence rails go each side through to the end.

Turn the angle iron over so the flat is on top, this way you can’t pull the bolts into the top and end up with unevenness/dimples around the work surface. Use large washers underneath.

The top work surface/ particle board does not have to be too thick depending on the unsupported span.
It allows more access to the router. I used 1/4” aluminum for the plate and hung a 3hp Triton on it.

I have 2 legs and a cross angle at the other end. If you use particle board/mdf I would be inclined to have aluminum angle each side as well to keep it flat.

The saw to angle iron holes were drilled 1mm oversize to allow for fine adjustment of the top.

The cutouts were just wide enough for me to get an open ended spanner on the bolt heads and deep enough to allow the bolt head to turn they did not come through the top as they protruded below the ply.

Diagram is how I did my old saw. The new one does not have slots.
The extra slot allowed me together with the slot on the table saw to have 2 slides on my table saw cutoff sled even though it is on one side of the blade. Makes it more accurate especially for long items.

Hope this helps.

View nobuckle's profile

nobuckle

1120 posts in 1418 days


#10 posted 11-06-2010 01:44 PM

Yes, I can see how placing the aluminum angle on the top is a much better idea. The material that I’m using is 5/4 thick. If the router table extends to the end of my fence rail (about 15”) I’ll need to support the front of it some how. It’s been suggested that I create some simple legs or even a cabinet to support the front. If I go with the cabinet I’ll have to make sure to leave room for access to my tilting handle – my table saw tilts to the left. I may end up leaving the upper portion of the support open and create a small drawer in the bottom portion. That’s the joy of prototype design and sketchup makes that a breeze. Thanks for the clarification. Take care.

-- Doug - Make an effort to live by the slogan "We try harder"

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase