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Art Deco TV Table #5: Veneering, The Inside Story - Make a Saddle (Pommel)

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Blog entry by newTim posted 11-28-2015 04:01 AM 1053 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Put Your Best Front Forward Part 5 of Art Deco TV Table series Part 6: Drawers Are Everything! »

I called it a saddle, but it is more like a pommel as in gymnastics’ pommel horse. Whatever. In order to veneer the inside of the curved drawer fronts, and ensure adequate clamping pressure at all points, I had to make a perfectly matching curved form or block to press against. While I had never done this before, I relied on memory of several of David Marks’ Woodworks TV shows and videos where he described the process and key elements. The goal is to make the block undersized enough to allow for a layer of 1/4” thick cork, which I was able to find wider sheets at a hobby store, and cover that with a layer of packing tape so the glue doesn’t stick. And lastly, to use a glue that hardens upon curing. I think David mixes his own, but for this application I used the TightbondOne premixed and it worked great.

I made the pommel/saddle the same was as the drawer fronts shown in the previous chapters. I made a pattern, rough cut the shapes, and trimmed them to the pattern on the router table. I glued them together making sure they were perfectly aligned and glued a layer of cork sheet with the packing tape on last. You may be wondering why I didn’t use the vacuum press? Well I did, but I found using the screw press and side clamps worked best. Because of the steep angle of the sides the vacuum press didn’t quite supply the pressure needed for a real tight bond. I cut clamping wedges to the appropriate angle which allowed for a clamp to provide the 90 degree pressure and it worked great.

So after the drawer fronts set I did some light hand sanding and cut them to width on the bandsaw which I had set up using one of David Marks videos as a guide. The result speaks for itself. So without further explanation, justification, or defense (I have none), I hereby present The Inside Story, Veneering the Inside Curve. Enjoy.

Whew! Just four more drawers to go! So I’m guessing you may have questions? What is the pink blanket for? And the moving pad? And where did you get that real cool, innovative screw press? Well I’ve got answers. An electric blanket. An insulating pad to hold in the heat. I invented it. And it was a Daily Top 3 too!

Next time we’ll veneer the outside curve, or the drawer fronts. Maybe call it The Outside Story?

-- tim hill www.newcalshop.com



7 comments so far

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3564 days


#1 posted 11-28-2015 04:05 AM

I love veneer projects! I do the same thing, I use a heat blanket with a moving blanket on top to hold the heat in. It beats trying to raise the shop temperature in an attempt to warm the project.!

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7173 posts in 2263 days


#2 posted 11-28-2015 03:04 PM

I admire your ingenuity and your result is evidence that it works.
Not a criticism, just a question, did you consider hammer veneering these parts?
It would have made the process much easier and quicker.
I do like what you are doing and will be watching for the finished project.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View newTim's profile

newTim

597 posts in 3072 days


#3 posted 11-28-2015 05:50 PM

Hello Todd, great to hear from you again. Re the electric blanket, I’m sure you use that often being way way up north. :) And yes, you can see from the before and after readings on the thermometer just how effective it is. We all know how much glue loves heat, or warmth, whatever.

Hello Paul. I visited your website. Stunning work. Re hammer veneering, I didn’t know what it is until you mentioned it and I just watched a couple of videos. I’m sure you could adapt it to the curved surfaces, but in watching the videos it looks like it works best on flat surfaces. Again, I don’t really know as I’ve never done it. One of the problems with the curved surfaces, especially those curved as tight as these, is holding the veneer in place. I assume with the hammer veneering perhaps once you lay the veneer on the substrate it sticks enough to hold until you press it with the hammer?

I’ve been thinking that if I do another project like this I will try a bent lamination with finished veneer on the top and bottom of a substrate using bending plywood. I would build a large pommel form and probably a curved top pressing form. I would still use clamps on the sides for better direct pressure. I would then probably cut away the drawers using a track saw or table saw. Actually, I’ve been thinking about another jewelry armoire in this shape so it would be four to five feet tall or so. We’ll see.

-- tim hill www.newcalshop.com

View newTim's profile

newTim

597 posts in 3072 days


#4 posted 11-28-2015 06:18 PM

I found some more pictures. Call them outtakes. But they show a better view of the bending form and the initial approach using the vacuum press. A little Rube Goldberg looking, and not as effective as the simpler screw press.

-- tim hill www.newcalshop.com

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7173 posts in 2263 days


#5 posted 11-28-2015 09:44 PM

Hi Tim, hammer veneering relies on the high initial tack of hot hide glue and then uses the hammer to squeeze the air out from under the veneer. The glue gels as it squeezes out and seals the edges creating the same situation as a vacuum bag except without the vacuum and without the bag. It will certainly work on curved surfaces with the thin commercial veneers that we use these days.
Here’s a little video that I did on a hatch project a year or so back. Not a curved surface but it shows the technique.
http://lumberjocks.com/shipwright/blog/36014

If you like playing around with veneers, it is a very good one to have in your repertoire.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View newTim's profile

newTim

597 posts in 3072 days


#6 posted 11-29-2015 12:24 AM

Thanks again Paul. Yes, it sure looks like a great technique and skill to have. I’m looking forward to trying it out.

-- tim hill www.newcalshop.com

View Roger's profile

Roger

19878 posts in 2269 days


#7 posted 12-22-2015 11:48 AM

One hell-of-a blog going on

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

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