LumberJocks

Nicholson Bench #2: A ripping workout

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by mpmitche posted 09-14-2011 03:49 AM 1346 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Getting started Part 2 of Nicholson Bench series Part 3: Legs Ready »

I worked on the bench some more tonight by ripping the legs and stretchers to width. I doesn’t look like much but here is my pile of finished work.

It was quite a workout once you take into account that it was done like this.

I’m not sure if I need to sharpen my saw better, add some sloped gullets, or just start lifting weights but it seems like it should go faster. I think I’ll try another sharpening before the next go if nother else it will take out a little of the set which seems a bit much to me.

-- Mike, Western New York



9 comments so far

View mafe's profile

mafe

9547 posts in 1746 days


#1 posted 09-14-2011 12:02 PM

Yes the saw should run like in butter in that wood.
Go and sharpen sounds right.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View nobuckle's profile

nobuckle

1120 posts in 1418 days


#2 posted 09-14-2011 05:37 PM

You are the man! I applaud your use of traditional methods to rip the material. It’s gratifying to think back and know that you did the whole job with hand tools and muscle power. I find myself using hand tools whenever I can. Great job.

-- Doug - Make an effort to live by the slogan "We try harder"

View Bsmith's profile

Bsmith

305 posts in 1327 days


#3 posted 09-14-2011 07:20 PM

One thing you might and I couldn’t tell by the picture… did you have it plugged in? ;-) You are the man!

-- Bryan

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5113 posts in 2369 days


#4 posted 09-21-2011 03:59 AM

This may be a stupid question but are you using a rip saw? A crosscut saw will definitely make you work harder ripping then crosscutting. I know the difference on my old tablesaw was a night and day difference when I started using a purpose built ripsaw for ripping, I assume it is the same for handsaws.

I spent yesterday evening in my shop planing some boards down for a box I am making, I can really appreciate the amount of work you are doing to get your stretchers and legs to dimension!

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View mpmitche's profile

mpmitche

405 posts in 1633 days


#5 posted 09-22-2011 03:27 AM

It is a 5pp rip saw. I picked it up for about $5 it is an old Disston. I sharpened it up with 0 rake but didn’t have a proper file, only a Harbor Frieght job. I’m not sure if the quality of the file could be the issue but I plan to resharpen it with a good file and about 20degrees of slope to the gullets next time around and see what it does.

-- Mike, Western New York

View Mark Shymanski's profile

Mark Shymanski

5113 posts in 2369 days


#6 posted 09-22-2011 04:20 AM

Many years ago I was in charge of a work crew using two man crosscut saws and we’d oil or wax the blades to get them to slice through the wood faster…maybe you could wax the blade?

-- "Checking for square? What madness is this! The cabinet is square because I will it to be so!" Jeremy Greiner LJ Topic#20953 2011 Feb 2

View AgentTwitch's profile

AgentTwitch

126 posts in 2153 days


#7 posted 11-05-2011 02:46 AM

I know this comment is a bit delayed, but if you filed (cut) the teeth after jointing and didn’t go back with a finer file to remove the mill marks, you didn’t sharpen the saw, you just have even height dull saw teeth. Kind of like a steak knife instead of a razor blade. if the blade isn’t tracking or it’s binding on the cut, it’s time to add some set.

-- Regards, Norm

View mpmitche's profile

mpmitche

405 posts in 1633 days


#8 posted 11-05-2011 08:22 PM

Norm,

It’s never too late and thanks for the tip. I did use a cheap file to shape the teeth and I think touching it up with a higher quality saw file may make a big difference. I am planning to do that and if it still doesn’t cut like I want I will try adding some slope to the gullets to see if I can further improve the cut. The saw tracks well and doesn’t bind at all. I actually think some further sharpening to reduce the set may improve the saws function as well.

-- Mike, Western New York

View AgentTwitch's profile

AgentTwitch

126 posts in 2153 days


#9 posted 11-06-2011 03:06 AM

Get yourself a fine toothed file and follow up with a gentle stroke or two on each tooth. Just enough to remove the mill marks left after shaping the teeth. the saw should be sharp enough that if you gently rest your hand on the blade that it will grab instantly and feel like sharp knives. If your saw tracks straight (test a cut with your eyes closed by Drawing a straight line on a scrap board and cut without peaking so you don’t compensate for drift) and your kerf isn’t too wide, I wouldn’t change your set.

You are going to look like pop eye after this bench :)

-- Regards, Norm

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase