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Turning a Bowl #2: Hollowing

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Blog entry by mot posted 2541 days ago 1981 reads 1 time favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Turning the Bottom Part 2 of Turning a Bowl series Part 3: Finishing Cuts, Sanding, Oil »

Hi Folks,

Here’s Part II of my Turning a Bowl Series: Hollowing the Bowl.

Thanks for watching and I hope everyone had a great weekend!

Tom

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)



14 comments so far

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

3958 posts in 2651 days


#1 posted 2541 days ago

Mot-
Great job! Just noticed that when you say “friends” in the CyberSkillShare intro, you sound just the slightest bit like Fred (Mr.) Rogers.

You mentioned something about wall thickness being “too thick for solid wood” (not an exact quote). Is there a hazard to the bowl in some regard if walls are let too thick? Made me wonder if wood moving across the width of the grain would cause a split.

Second, nice teaching point to point out the changes in the sound of the scraper as the bowl wall thins.

You inspired me to hit the now dwindling boxelder stash over the weekend, so the video is having the desired effect. Thanks for the time and effort put into the series.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18614 posts in 2747 days


#2 posted 2541 days ago

well done – again.
It is fascinating to watch a bowl develop.
The video really helps with the tips – rather than the written word. We can “hear” the lessons as they happen

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View scottb's profile

scottb

3647 posts in 2914 days


#3 posted 2541 days ago

Funny Douglas, I heard the same thing!

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2623 days


#4 posted 2541 days ago

I’ll shoot a new intro with me changing into my inside shoes. LOL. Douglas, there isn’t really a problem with wall thickness in a dry bowl. My comment was more motivated by a wet wood bowl where it’s good to leave a fair amount of wall thickness in order to be able to turn the bowl round after your chosen drying method. As far as the dry bowls go, I could have tuend that one thinner, I just like some meat to my bowls.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Joel Tille's profile

Joel Tille

213 posts in 2831 days


#5 posted 2541 days ago

Thanks Mot – I have tried to turn a couple of bowls, it sure seems easy. They turned out ok, but i will continue to watch and pick up tips that will help me.

Thanks,

-- Joel Tille

View scottb's profile

scottb

3647 posts in 2914 days


#6 posted 2541 days ago

Hey Darth Tater… you needs ta change your signature line… or is Potato Parker dressed up for a Sci-Fi Con?

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12239 posts in 2684 days


#7 posted 2541 days ago

Great video Tom. Looking forward to your next one.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2584 days


#8 posted 2541 days ago

Alright! Thanks Tom – I’m all caught up and ready for number 3!

I’m with Douglas; I may have to set up the lathe this weekend and have a go (if I’m lucky)! Haven’t done that for awhile. No box elder for me though! Drats!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View PanamaJack's profile

PanamaJack

4469 posts in 2664 days


#9 posted 2540 days ago

Tom, Great Job! Thanks for sharing with us. Lots of good insite.

-- Carpe Lignum; Tornare Lignum (Seize the wood, to Turn the wood)

View Cathy Krumrei's profile

Cathy Krumrei

364 posts in 2773 days


#10 posted 2435 days ago

I enjoyed the video, these are great for a novice like me! ? what is the reason of having the hole in the middle first? (see a real novice ?) Is it the centering point? Do you drill this or use the tool? Where is the first video? I see I am going to have to sweeten up Santa for some tools. Thanks for any info.
Krum

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2623 days


#11 posted 2435 days ago

Hey Krum,

If you look at the top of the page, you’ll see the navigation to the first part of the series as well as the rest of the series. The hole is drilled to accept the screw from the chuck for turning the bottom of the bowl. I show why in the first video. The series is a chaptered blog with the first part here.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2608 days


#12 posted 2435 days ago

Another good “seggie” Mr. Mot.

Bob ( Still AKA ninefinger)

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5315 posts in 2664 days


#13 posted 2398 days ago

awesome…

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View PhilipR's profile

PhilipR

17 posts in 2373 days


#14 posted 2371 days ago

It was nice to see you using the scraper so extensively. I had been told by several turners prior to watching your video that the scraper is really only good for finishing cuts, but you obviously used it for more than that. When I tried using a scraper recently (first time actually) on the inside of a bowl, I found it difficult to control. The scraper seemed to want to cut in very easily, so I would react by pulling back. In the end, once the bowl stopped turning, it looks like the scraper bounced along the inside of the bowl leaving little divots all over the place. I guess practice makes perfect!

Thanks for a great video!

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