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Trestle dining table #7: all done! (Well, the top is probably only temporary)

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Blog entry by moshel posted 05-28-2013 11:32 PM 975 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: The finished and assembled base Part 7 of Trestle dining table series no next part

the top had to be done from two pieces that can be easily disassembled as it had to pass through narrow staircase and also probably be moved around quite a bit. the thought of waving around 60kg beech top was not really appealing, so i decided at least for now to use DF and have it in two pieces.
for finish i used an effect i found out while trying to bleach the base. I mixed tung oil with oxide powder, about 1:1 and rubbed it into the 80 grit sanded DF. the oxide settled into the scratches and the soft parts and created a very pretty effect. i thought i would continue and finish it with 4 more layers of tung oil but its getting cold here and each layer takes about a week to dry. so, i slapped two layers of blond shellac on top, and finished with 3 layers of waterborne poly. couldnt use oil based poly as too cold. while the waterborne was drying i had the heating going. very pleased with the result. it looks rough but actually very smooth.

thats how the finish look from about 1m:

the two parts of the top where joined with office furniture desktop connectors:

and here are some picture of the finished product:



-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...



5 comments so far

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 2660 days


#1 posted 05-29-2013 12:49 AM

Ok, the end result is very nice! And it actually does look very smooth. Not a gloss finish but matte – which is the way I prefer for a table. If it gets some use, any marks will not show too greatly and just add character!

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

View matai's profile

matai

32 posts in 1561 days


#2 posted 05-29-2013 12:59 AM

Fabulous table Moshe. You’re achieved great contrast with the Douglas Fir. Very handy to be able to break it down for moving.

-- Dave, Christchurch NZ

View moshel's profile

moshel

864 posts in 2429 days


#3 posted 05-29-2013 01:05 AM

here is a super closeup to help understand why it looks rough

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

View andyboy's profile

andyboy

501 posts in 2019 days


#4 posted 05-29-2013 01:11 AM

Orbital sanders with less than 180 grit can be a nightmare to get right. I only use 240 and up if I choose to use orbital. Love the finished product. Looks great!!

-- Andy Halewoodworker. You can't finish if you don't finish. So finish it, because finish is everything.

View moshel's profile

moshel

864 posts in 2429 days


#5 posted 05-29-2013 02:38 AM

i actually did this on purpose…. i know the effect of ROS, especially on soft resin timber but my tests showed that this gives the oxide/tung mixture place to sit and while very smooth (it fills all the scratches) it broadcast roughness. i really like this effect. gives a bit of tension to the piece.

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

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