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Bunk Bed Build #5: Panels, Long Rails, and Mounting Brackets

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Blog entry by Mauricio posted 372 days ago 1470 reads 0 times favorited 26 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Plowing Grooves in the Rails and Posts Part 5 of Bunk Bed Build series Part 6: Mortising Rail Brackets & Plowing Deco Grooves »

Hello again folks. Here is the update on my project. I’ll let the pictures do most of the talking.

I experiment with new circ saw method. I just scored the first line and then eyeballed the second utility knife cut to the thickness of the blade. Then followed the line free hand.

Works Great! Very little tear out.

Those of you who follow the Workbench thread already know that I cut into my bench doing this. :-( So, I won’t rehash that here. Fixing that will have to be a separate blog.

After some trimming with a block plane the panels fit great.

Next cleaned up and prepared the long stretchers.

Then I cut the stretchers to final length by hand. No pictures of this process, basically the same way I cut the other parts with a square, knife, and crosscut saw.

Next to prepare the stretchers for the metal mounting brackets I will be using. They will be screwed in so I drilled and inserted some cross grain oak dowels to give the screws some long grain to bite into. You’ll see what I mean in a minute.

First I had to make some dowels. Started off with a square piece of red oak.

Then I made a jig for planning it round.


Further refinement with the spoke shave.

Then cut to length

Then I drilled some holes on the underside of the stretcher ends. I clamped a piece of scrap on to help me eyeball plumb.

Please note, the crocs are in the pic because I’m NOT wearing them. lol.

Then I just glued in the dowels. Some fit a little lose so I sprinkled in some saw dust.

Next I routed out the space for the brackets. I tried using the #71 but that didnt work out so well on end grain. So I used the power router and cleaned up the rest with a chisel.

So that’s where I’m at so far. Next to rout out the mortise for the receiving end of the bracket.

Thanks for watching!

Mauricio

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch



26 comments so far

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

4410 posts in 1046 days


#1 posted 372 days ago

Looks great Mauricio! Your jig to make a dowel is fun stuff too.

Thanks man. :-)

-- ~Tony

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

4516 posts in 898 days


#2 posted 372 days ago

Nice work. How’d you use the router on the end of the stretcher? Sounds scary to me lol

I also like the sticking board too

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View Monte Pittman's profile (online now)

Monte Pittman

13387 posts in 943 days


#3 posted 372 days ago

As usual your work is flawless

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6753 posts in 1757 days


#4 posted 372 days ago

Thanks Tony & Mont!

Mos, it wasn’t the easiest thing. I did it with the router and an edge guide and I had to stand on a stool to get up there and do it. LOL.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9633 posts in 1224 days


#5 posted 372 days ago

Driving in hand-made oak dowels to get cross-grain anchorage is inspired work, Maur. Really. Very impressive, and built for the long haul. Way high on the Galoot index as well, ‘lectric routah work nothwithstanding. :-)

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Don W's profile

Don W

14676 posts in 1173 days


#6 posted 372 days ago

I like it, from a router to cut a groove to a hand plane to make a dowel. Woodworking at its best!!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6753 posts in 1757 days


#7 posted 372 days ago

Thanks Smitty! I just couldn’t figure out a good galoot way to do it. I did do a practice piece with the #71 but that sucked! Not the best tool for end grain and I didn’t look forward to the frequent sharpening of that blade. I guess the true galoot fashion wouldn’t involve these metal brackets.

Thanks Don, that’s what I love about having the hand tool skills, you have options. Do the fun stuff by hand the drudgery by machine.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5260 posts in 1204 days


#8 posted 372 days ago

Hand made dowels. That is taking it to the next level. I have used that type hardware a few times, the first tile I chiseled out the end grain. Kind of looked like a beaver chewed it out. The next time I turned to the router. Umm, way easier and faster, and I really dislike routers too.

View JayT's profile

JayT

2118 posts in 816 days


#9 posted 372 days ago

Creative solutions, high values of galoot-ness, and even a power tool admission thrown in. What a page-turning read! Or maybe that should be a page down button pressing read? (The project is looking pretty good, too, Mauricio)

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6753 posts in 1757 days


#10 posted 372 days ago

Thanks Shane, good to hear you had a similar experience.

So the brackets have held up? I’ve had my doubt but have read good reviews. I got them from Lee Valley and I’m also putting my faith on the fact that they seem to only sell good stuff.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

4516 posts in 898 days


#11 posted 372 days ago

Ok, I can’t help it anylonger, sorry but ”Works Great! Very little tear out”

Should have been great on the other side too, since you had a backer board on it :-P

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6753 posts in 1757 days


#12 posted 372 days ago

Glad you enjoyed the show Jay. Thanks for commenting.

Mos, LOL, true. That is the picture of the cut that scored my bench and I was all proud of it then the realization sank in. Oh Sh*t! I hate that sinking feeling.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5260 posts in 1204 days


#13 posted 372 days ago

Yeah, I was really concerned about the brackets too, but they are like door hinges in the way they are mortised it. Had some in use for a couple of years on a twin bed, and about a year on my king bed, no issues. They are easy to “knock down” and remove. They don’t “square” bed though. Since you will be using the beds in a stacked fashion, I would imagine once you have the lower unit square, the top will have no choice when installed but to be square also.

Really coming along nicely.

View rfusca's profile

rfusca

155 posts in 449 days


#14 posted 372 days ago

Very nicely done! Very awesome on the dowels.

-- Chris S., North Atlanta, GA - woodworker,DBA, cook, photographer

View Brit's profile

Brit

5109 posts in 1448 days


#15 posted 372 days ago

Great progress Mauricio. Sorry to hear about the scar on your bench. I’m sure you’ll fix it though.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

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