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Bunk Bed Build #4: Plowing Grooves in the Rails and Posts

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Blog entry by Mauricio posted 401 days ago 1078 reads 0 times favorited 48 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Hand Cut Tenons for the Head/Foot Boards Part 4 of Bunk Bed Build series Part 5: Panels, Long Rails, and Mounting Brackets »

Hello again folks, the next step was to plow some groves in the stretchers and posts of the head board.
The old Stanley #45 was the weapon of choice for this stage of the project which is a lot of fun to use.
Here I am with the tool in action! In my head I look much cooler doing this.

The first challenge I had to overcome was the lack of a plywood sized cutter. As you are all aware ¾” plywood is slightly undersized so I had to use the next size down and then pair away the rest of the waste by hand.

So first I plow most of the groove out.

Then use the sweet gauge I got from the swap as a cutting gauge to begin to cut out the rest of the waste. Here I used progressively deeper passes.

Next I undercut it with a utility knife.

Then with the same knife I score deeply down the gauge line. This almost cuts the whole piece free but it takes a couple more passes.

No project is complete with out an error to fix! I got a little to aggressive chopping through a knot that was inconveniently in the way of my groove. But a little glue and blue tape and its like nothing happened. :-)

So here we are with some groovy rails!

Next to grove the posts to accept the sides of the panels. This was a similar process but with a couple of minor difficulties. I set the rails in the posts and marked the exact location of the groove. The problem arises when you connect the dots and your line is not perfectly parallel to the sides.

The solution was to plow the grove down the middle and pair away the rest of the waste by hand as above but without the benefit of being able to use the marking gauge.



The plow plane gets most of the groove but can’t fully reach the back part so I clean up that part with the router plane.

On the couples that were not paralleled I had to use my chisel on its side like a side rabbet plane. I need me a side rabet plane! For next time of course.

So here we are with everything grooved up and in perfect alignment ready for the panels!


Thanks for watching! Questions and comments are welcome.

Mauricio

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch



48 comments so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9765 posts in 1245 days


#1 posted 401 days ago

Maur, that is good stuff Man!

I applaud the use of the #45 and #71 planes; the vintage tool force is Strong with you!

Might I suggest a #79 Side Rabbet for your till? It’s left and right, retractable, and uber-easy / comfortable to hold and use. Great blog post, love the progress.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

4548 posts in 1067 days


#2 posted 401 days ago

So fun to watch Mauricio. You look so serious in pic #1.

Really informative Mauricio. You are doing a great job.

Thanks for taking us along man.

-- ~Tony

View JayT's profile

JayT

2179 posts in 838 days


#3 posted 401 days ago

In my head I look much cooler doing this

Made me laugh with that one—I feel the same way. The good part is that using a #45 will always up the cool factor by a few points.

Nice job, Mauricio.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10653 posts in 1633 days


#4 posted 401 days ago

Awesome progress Mauricio. As Smitty said, the force is strong. Pumpin it so your little man can properly claim his top bunk. I dig it.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

4597 posts in 919 days


#5 posted 401 days ago

Very nice. You could have also used an even narrower cutter to do the groove on one side for all of them, and then reset to essentially do a rabbet to finish the other side of the groove. But it looks like it worked out well either way

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View terryR's profile

terryR

3039 posts in 935 days


#6 posted 401 days ago

Very nice, work, Maur! Your grooves and tenons, everything looks factory made. Super clean lines! Love your 71, the knobs look hand polished from hours of use…perfect.

Now I see why you’re so hot to get a side rebate plane…but I gotta remember the chisel on its edge trick. Thanks for sharing!

Ya know, it’s hard to look cool staring down at a hand tool. Luckily, all us hand tool geeks are busy looking at the 45 and the shavings. Sweet! :)

-- tr ...see one, do one, teach one...

View theoldfart's profile

theoldfart

4014 posts in 1078 days


#7 posted 401 days ago

Maur, gallootness personified! Wonder if the slitter on the 45 would have worked?
Outstanding work and your kids will have this blog to show their kids what grandpa did!

-- "Aged flatus, I heard that some one has already blown out your mortise." THE Surgeon ……………………………………. Kevin

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6799 posts in 1778 days


#8 posted 401 days ago

Thanks Smitty! Yes I really want a side rabbet plane but I’m going to try and make one first. There is a plane swap coming up after all!

Tony, I took a pic with me smiling to but that just looked even goofier. Thanks for commenting.

Thanks JayT & Stef. Your comments are much appreciated.

Mos, that’s a great idea! Two 3/8” grooves would have taken care of it. That’s what you get when you don’t go talk to the master first. :-) I did try that same idea but with the same wide cutter on the last 1/8” of material left but the skate wouldn’t ride right. It would fall into the big groove.

Thanks Terry, the chisel works in a pinch (with both hands on it) but it’s not easy. I’m a big fan of this 71 to, I’ve done no cleanup on it, that’s how it was when I got it and I like the patina. Same with the 45. I should give them at least a thorough degreasing one of these days at least.

Thanks Kevin, I thought about the slitter but its beveled on both sides so I think it would have bruised up the edges of the rabbet.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9765 posts in 1245 days


#9 posted 401 days ago

Re: the Slitter on the #45…

It’d have to be straight grained stuff to ensure a decent outcome, don’t you think?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

4597 posts in 919 days


#10 posted 401 days ago

yeah Smitty… and in my experience, the slitter isn’t as easy to use as a chisel lol

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6799 posts in 1778 days


#11 posted 401 days ago

I’ve never used the slitter but I think it would be more functional if it was only beveled on one side.

Lately I’m really likening the utility knife for a lot of things. I sharpen it on the diamond stones and strop first (Paul Sellers tip). It does great for scribing tenon shoulders and for “slitting” as I’ve done here. Also the thinness of the blade is a big plus because it can really score a deep line with less resistance from compression.

I might have to get me one of the Stanley utility knives that Paul Sellers uses.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

4597 posts in 919 days


#12 posted 401 days ago

I use a utility knife for a lot of stuff too. When I was making the second counter top try, I used nothing but the utility knife, a chisel, and the router plane when I made the stopped dado in the mahogany. Did the same in poplar and mahogany for the stopped dados for the clocks I made as well.

I would agree about the single sided bevel may be easier to use on the #45… I think I just have a hard time sharpening it

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View widdle's profile

widdle

1378 posts in 1626 days


#13 posted 401 days ago

Good stuff..Some serious production goin on there..Those moulding type planes look really usefull…Looking forward to trying one soon..Roy would be proud..

View BigRedKnothead's profile

BigRedKnothead

4700 posts in 609 days


#14 posted 401 days ago

Good stuff brother. +1 with JayT

In my head I look much cooler doing this

Story of my life;-)

-- Red -- "That the powerful play goes on, and you may contribute a verse." W. Whitman

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10653 posts in 1633 days


#15 posted 401 days ago

Take solace Maur, ya look cooler than this lol.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

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