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Workbench Build - Splayed leg French Bench #3: Tap for Wooden Nut

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Blog entry by Mauricio posted 03-14-2012 04:06 PM 6384 reads 8 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Guide Block for the Wooden Screw Tap Part 3 of Workbench Build - Splayed leg French Bench series Part 4: Wooden Screw »

Hello again,

On the last blog I made the guide block that guides the tap. Here I’ve made the tap and cut my first nut last night! I’m very excited about this accomplishment, this is really the most challenging part of the build and I think cutting the screw to fit will be pretty straight forward.

If you’re like me, you like looking at pictures more than reading so here are some pics showing the process I followed with a brief explanation.

Laid out thread pitch on paper (2tpi so on tick mark every 1/2” then connect the dots)

Taped the layout sheet onto the dowel.

Used double stick carpet tape to attached the depth stop onto my saw

Then simply cut down the line on my shooting board/Bench hook.

The kerf with this saw was actually to narrow so I had to go back over it with my panel saw to widen it out.

The next step is to find some steel to use as a cutter. My friend works at hospitals with a medical equipment company. He hooked me up with some surgical chisels that they were getting rid of. He said they were stainless steel so I was a little concerned that they wouldn’t be ideal for woodworking but the one I used worked out great. I plan to use the others to make Skew chisels and such.

This is the 1/2” chisel I used for my cutter.

I ground the 45 degree angles on both sides with the tool rest set on a slight angle to give the back edge of the blade good clearance.

I put a little hollow grind on the face of it to make it easier to flatten the face.

I laid out the mortise using the same pitch angle as the threads, drilled a couple of holes on the drill press and then chiseled out the waste.

The blade is wedge shaped so I used it in conjunction with a wooden wedge and it held in place pretty well.

Here is how I set up my Tap. The guide block is clamped to the nut, and the nut is clamped to the bench.

And here is the first pass through the nut.

It only takes 5 turns to get through this nut (about 2 1/2”). You have to make a lot of light passes to get to the full depth of the thread, I lost count but it was about 12ish.

And here is the final product!!!

And no project is complete without a drop of blood on it (top right of the whole). lol, I’m sure this happens to everyone.

I’ll be working on the screw next. I’ll be carving it by had, it seems pretty straight forward. Pray that it fits the nut! I don’t see any reason it shouldn’t.

Thanks for watching,

Mauricio

EDIT: I cant forget to again thank Carter for posting his blog on making wooden screws. He has some pretty good videos on the process here http://lumberjocks.com/CartersWhittling/blog/27648

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch



21 comments so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1360 days


#1 posted 03-14-2012 04:19 PM

Friggin awesome.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4871 posts in 1290 days


#2 posted 03-14-2012 04:51 PM

I was wondering where my damn chisels went!

Wonderful job Mauricio. Quite resourceful.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4138 posts in 1618 days


#3 posted 03-14-2012 05:04 PM

Great work, Mauricio! I see this coming in handy for all sorts of things!

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View Don W's profile

Don W

15060 posts in 1234 days


#4 posted 03-14-2012 06:13 PM

Thanks for the blog. I have added this to my favorites, to be frefered to when I get around to doing the same thing.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View AnthonyReed's profile

AnthonyReed

4717 posts in 1107 days


#5 posted 03-14-2012 07:32 PM

Outstanding Mauricio. Thanks.

-- ~Tony

View luv2learn's profile

luv2learn

1718 posts in 970 days


#6 posted 03-14-2012 07:47 PM

Mauricio, I am glad you decided to do a blog on this. I originally saw this done by Carter also, http://lumberjocks.com/CartersWhittling/blog/27648 but it is encouraging to see another woodworker repeat his method. I will be trying this method when I start my work bench project. Great job!!

-- Lee - Northern idaho~"If the women don't find you handsome, at least they ought to find you handy"~ Red Green

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6820 posts in 1818 days


#7 posted 03-14-2012 07:57 PM

Thanks for all the comments guys and thanks for watching.

Luv2Learn, Don – or anyone else thinking of doing this, I encourage you to try, it doesn’t take that long and is not hard. I would equate the difficulty level to making a wooden plane for the first time.

I ordered my dowels because I don’t have a lathe and besides the grinder I haven’t used a power tool yet. I won’t need it for the cutting the threads on the screw either.

However, I am contemplating making the router jig for cutting the threads on the screw, especially since I already have this practice nut made, I can easily turn it into the thread cutting jig. It would be handy if I plan to make more.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6820 posts in 1818 days


#8 posted 03-14-2012 07:58 PM

Scott, what do you know about these medical chisels? What do you use them for as a doctor?

I’m pretty sure they are stainless steel, especially after seeing the sparks the steel makes at the grinder.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4871 posts in 1290 days


#9 posted 03-14-2012 08:20 PM

Mauricio, we call them osteotomes. I use them quite often to chisel bone i.e. taking a bone graft. Most surgical steel is 316 stainless.

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1360 days


#10 posted 03-14-2012 08:32 PM

^No metallurgist here, give me the Cliffs on 316. Don’t mean to be gory, but surgeons leave good looking stuff in my patients. I autoclave it and put it in a box. No one’s asked for it back yet. Is it worth shaping into something? Mauricio, while your friend is at it, hit up the radiology dept. for spent lead. Reloaders love that premium stuff.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View lysdexic's profile

lysdexic

4871 posts in 1290 days


#11 posted 03-14-2012 08:44 PM

Maybe THAT is what happened to my osteotomes. I left them somewhere and I can’t find them. Just kidding (before the lawyer types can’t sense the humor)

-- It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe. - Muhammad Ali

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6820 posts in 1818 days


#12 posted 03-14-2012 08:59 PM

Ha Ha ha, Al, your patients are not usually living if I remember right?

It held up well in this application where it was scraping the wood out for the nut. Here is a little info I found on it. My guess is it is Medium Carbon Steel. I dont know if stainless steel has the edge retention of the high carbon steel we use for woodworking.

http://www.azom.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=863

“Grade 316 is the standard molybdenum-bearing grade, second in importance to 304 amongst the austenitic stainless steels. The molybdenum gives 316 better overall corrosion resistant properties than Grade 304, particularly higher resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion in chloride environments. It has excellent forming and welding characteristics. It is readily brake or roll formed into a variety of parts for applications in the industrial, architectural, and transportation fields. Grade 316 also has outstanding welding characteristics. Post-weld annealing is not required when welding thin sections.

Grade 316L, the low carbon version of 316 and is immune from sensitisation (grain boundary carbide precipitation). Thus it is extensively used in heavy gauge welded components (over about 6mm). Grade 316H, with its higher carbon content has application at elevated temperatures, as does stabilised grade 316Ti.

The austenitic structure also gives these grades excellent toughness, even down to cryogenic temperatures.

Key PropertiesThese properties are specified for flat rolled product (plate, sheet and coil) in ASTM A240/A240M. Similar but not necessarily identical properties are specified for other products such as pipe and bar in their respective specifications.”

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6820 posts in 1818 days


#13 posted 03-14-2012 09:00 PM

Al, I bet he can get the spent lead, I’ll ask. ;-)

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Brit's profile

Brit

5162 posts in 1509 days


#14 posted 03-14-2012 09:01 PM

Thanks for the close-ups and explanations Mauricio. Definitely one for the favourites. I must try this.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6820 posts in 1818 days


#15 posted 03-14-2012 09:07 PM

Thanks Brit! Hey I’m getting Favorite-ed by some woodworking studs. I’m honored.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

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