LumberJocks

New Handle for and Old Saw

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Mauricio posted 08-12-2011 06:43 PM 2850 reads 4 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here is my entry into the Western Hand Saw world. Until now I’ve used Japanese saws so I’m pretty excited to have this one.

I finally found an old saw at a thrift store. It was 50% off that day so it cost under $2bucks.
The blade is not taper ground. Does that date it to the early 1900’s? Also if anyone knows what Disston model number this is I would appreciate the info. I haven’t been able to figure it out.

It was in pretty rough shape.

The handle was cracked in two places and it was all full of worm holes so I decided to make a new one. I picked up some African Mahogany from the scrap bin at the lumber yard so I only have about a buck work of wood used in this handle. My only concern is that it is not the most durable wood but I figure if you can make ball and claw chair legs out of Mahogany then a saw handle should hold up.

Here, I design the new handle keeping within the old footprint of the old handle. I made some changes as I started shaping as I realized that some of the points were to fragile.

I roughed out the shape with a coping saw and drilled holes along some of the curves.

Ah but before I did that I needed to cut the kerf for the blade. I used a circular saw blade on my table saw. I also had to do some extra saw tune up to ensure a perfect cut. The blade wasn’t tall enough so I finished it off with a hand saw.

Here is the finished handle before applying the BLO and Wax finish.

First Coat of Oil (Tried and True Danish Oil)

De-rusting the saw plate with some Naval Jelly, wire brush and some 220grit sand paper. A little Beer to go with that. I share Brits habit of drinking while woodworking. I keep it down to one or two but only when doing not so dangerous activities.

I ordered some brass nuts on ebay. I had to counter bore them some to make them fit because my handle was thicker than the original. I did this with carving gouges since I didn’t have right sized forstner bits. I applied some dark wax and I’m done!


Now on to learning how to sharpen. I have my saw set and file ready to go for this. Hopefully I can get this thing cutting like a champ.

Thanks for looking. I appreciate any comments or feedback.

Thanks,

Mauricio

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch



13 comments so far

View DaddyZ's profile

DaddyZ

2432 posts in 1792 days


#1 posted 08-12-2011 06:57 PM

Nice Job !!!

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one

View steviep's profile

steviep

232 posts in 1398 days


#2 posted 08-12-2011 06:58 PM

Awesome job. I hope you share your tuning tricks with us. I stumbled onto some Disston D-12s last year but they dont cut very well. Maybe I can learn a thing or two.

-- StevieP ~ Micheal Tompkins - you were not here on earth long but left a giant mark on us. RIP Brother

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

15560 posts in 1319 days


#3 posted 08-12-2011 07:16 PM

Nice job. I’ve fixed a couple of handles, but I’ve not made the who handle yet. I’ll keep this blog around for when I do. Match it up at http://www.disstonianinstitute.com. The quick reference may help,” http://www.disstonianinstitute.com/quickglance.html":http://www.disstonianinstitute.com/quickglance.html or http://www.disstonianinstitute.com/d23page.html. The handles look like maybe a D-23? I just restored a D-23. Not as bad as yours, but I paid a whole dollar more.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View NH_Hermit's profile

NH_Hermit

391 posts in 1847 days


#4 posted 08-12-2011 07:17 PM

This makes me wonder where my father’s old hand saws went.

-- John from Horse Shoe

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6902 posts in 1903 days


#5 posted 08-12-2011 08:20 PM

Thanks everyone for the comments.

DonW: Thanks for the links. The only one I could find on your links that looked similar was the No. 5 Disston-Keystone Hand Saw. http://www.disstonianinstitute.com/key1.html

Its the only one with 4 nickle plated screws in a zig zag. But the one I have doesnt have the curved back, and no etching on the blade. I’ll keep looking….

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6902 posts in 1903 days


#6 posted 08-12-2011 08:56 PM

Stevip: I bought the Great Neck Saw Set and Extra Slim 6” taper file from Amazon. I’ll let you know how sharpening goes.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Brit's profile

Brit

5310 posts in 1594 days


#7 posted 08-12-2011 10:57 PM

Nice job Mauricio.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1866 days


#8 posted 08-14-2011 03:30 AM

looking realy good now
thank´s for sharing :-)

Dennis

View CalebMexquite's profile

CalebMexquite

9 posts in 1187 days


#9 posted 09-25-2011 08:21 PM

Check out Paul Sellers new book, he has a section in there on how to sharpen saws. paulsellers.com I took his 2 day restoration class in Wales and he taught us how to sharpen saws and restore Planes, etc.

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1287 posts in 1810 days


#10 posted 12-31-2013 04:04 AM

Mauricio,

The saw you have there, most likely is not older than aproximately 1950 or so. I definitely would date it as post WWII in age, if for no other reason than because you say it is NOT taper ground. Based on the shape of the handle and the straight back to the blade, my first guess would be that it is a D-23, but, to my knowledge, all of the D-23 saws were taper ground. From that, I would guess that this saw is probably one of the Disston Challenger or perhaps a late Keen Kutter. Not one of the most desirable or collectible saws, but still has very good steel in the blade and, once sharpened and tuned, should make a very good saw for you. Especially since you have made such a nice handle for it. If you have access to a belt sander, there is no reason that you cannot make this saw taper ground yourself. Simply sand away more at the back side of the saw starting about and inch or two above the teeth. You won’t hurt its value at all. You just want to try and sand the same amount on each side, but, if it isn’t perfect, it won’t matter much. All you need is for the back to be a few thousands of an inch thinner than along the tooth line.

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1287 posts in 1810 days


#11 posted 12-31-2013 04:05 AM

One other reference site to identify Disston saws is the www.vintagesaws.com website.

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1287 posts in 1810 days


#12 posted 12-31-2013 04:06 AM

My apologies, not Keen Kutter. It was the Keystone series of saws from Disston. Here is info:

http://www.vintagesaws.com/cgi-bin/frameset.cgi?left=main&right=/library/library.html

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

View docholladay's profile

docholladay

1287 posts in 1810 days


#13 posted 12-31-2013 04:07 AM

I believe that the one you have is the Disston Keystone K-6 Challenger.

Doc

-- Hey, woodworking ain't brain surgery. Just do something and keep trying till you get it. Doc

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase