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removing rust on machines

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Blog entry by mlbburg posted 10-06-2015 02:25 AM 889 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

He guys, I have a problem and I’m looking for some help. A bucket of chlorine sticks for our pool was left in my shop with the lid loose for several weeks. I don’t know all of the science, but the gas it put off rusted my table saw, jointer and drill press.

It’s pretty amazing really…the surfaces facing the bucket have MUCH more rust than the other surfaces. The proximity to the bucket also seems to have been a factor.

Can anyone advise me on how to remove the rust and restore the surfaces? Needless to say, I have made it very clear that the pool chemicals are not to be in the shop. Ever. Again.



6 comments so far

View JimDaddyO's profile

JimDaddyO

442 posts in 2543 days


#1 posted 10-06-2015 03:42 AM

I just did a video on it. Check it out.

-- my blog: http://watertoneworkshop.blogspot.ca/ my You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA?view_as=subscriber

View kepy's profile

kepy

292 posts in 1737 days


#2 posted 10-06-2015 01:07 PM

Some naval jelly applied with steel wool should solve your problem.

-- Kepy

View dschlic1's profile

dschlic1

330 posts in 1434 days


#3 posted 10-06-2015 08:02 PM

Evaporust works great. Wet a paper towel.

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 550 days


#4 posted 10-08-2015 02:46 AM

Ixnay on the Naval Jelly, +1 on the EvapoRust. It’s not as easy when you can’t submerge the part, but wet cloth or paper towels covered with plastic will work with some time. If you’ve not used EvapoRust, shoot me a message and I’ll send you info—I”ve used it to restore a number of tools over the years. Non-caustic, and will not scar the metal.

My shop rusted badly during the 5 years I wasn’t using it. I feel your pain!

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

View mlbburg's profile

mlbburg

2 posts in 434 days


#5 posted 10-08-2015 03:09 AM

Hey Forestgrl, thanks for the info. I’m apparently too new to the site to be able to send you a direct message. I’m really worried about flushing/rinsing any solvent but the Evaporust looks to be the less messy option. Any advice on methods would be greatly appreciated.

I saw a video on YouTube where a guy uses scotchbrite pads on a random orbital sander using WD40 as a lubricant. He got great results, but it looks really messy.

I don’t think my tools a too far gone anyway. It’s about enough rust to look bad and cause just enough drag on the work to be annoying.

View ForestGrl's profile

ForestGrl

445 posts in 550 days


#6 posted 10-08-2015 04:35 AM



Hey Forestgrl, thanks for the info. I m apparently too new to the site to be able to send you a direct message. I m really worried about flushing/rinsing any solvent but the Evaporust looks to be the less messy option. Any advice on methods would be greatly appreciated.

I saw a video on YouTube where a guy uses scotchbrite pads on a random orbital sander using WD40 as a lubricant. He got great results, but it looks really messy.

I don t think my tools a too far gone anyway. It s about enough rust to look bad and cause just enough drag on the work to be annoying.

- mlbburg

Actually, for really light rust, you could try the Scotchbrite without WD40—just test a small spot and see what happens. Or spray just a dab of WD40 on the pad before you mount it (he may have been using more than he needed, or more than you would need. Scrub, wipe, scrub. The EvapoRust is going to drip, so there is some mess. The trick is keeping it from dripping to bad places. It has to sit in contact with the rust for a period of time to convert the rusty iron to iron oxide. When you’re working with big flat tables, you need to put paper towels down that are wet-wet with EvR and let them lay there for an hour or two at least. Then pull them up and wipe the surface, if you need to use a damp cloth, rinse and repeat, then wipe dry and use steel or brass wool to take off anything that sticks.

How bad is your jointer? I till need to do mine, and it’s pretty bad. Definitely don’t soak the cutterhead! You don’t want to mess up the bearings, but if the knives are rusted you can soak them and the jack screws, they’ll come out pretty! Hopefully, it’s just the tables.

If you haven’t seen my recent blog entry, take a look—that restoration was done with EvR.

-- My mother said that anyone learning to cook needed a large dog to eat the mistakes. As a sculptor of wood I have always tried to keep a fireplace. (Norman Ridenour)

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